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BRITISH MUSEUM. 



KETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 28 February 1906 ;-/or, 

COPY " of Account of the Income and Expenditure of 
the British Museum (Special Trust Funds) for 
the Year ending the 31st day of March 1906 ; and, 
Return of the Number of Persons admitted to visit 
the Museum and the British Museum (Natural 
History) in each Year from 1900 to 1905, both Years 
inclusive ; together with a Statement of the Progress 
made in the Arrangement and Description of the 
Collections, and an Account of Objects added to 
them in the Year 1905." 



^''2TIpiS\%6''''| KEGINALD McKENNA. 



{Mr. Bothschild.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to he Printed, 
24 April 1906. 



LONDON: 

PRINTED FOR HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE, 

BY EYRE AND SPOTTISWOODE, 

PBINTERS TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY. 

And to be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from 
WYMAN AND SONS, Ltd., Fetter Lane, E.G. ; or 



124. 



OLIVER and BOYD, Edinburgh ; or 
E. PONSONBY, IIG, Graftox Street, Dublin. 




,;;. 



fvV 



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[ 3 ] 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
I.— ACCOUNT OF THE EECEIPTS AND EXPBNDITUEE OP 
THE BRIDGE WATEK FUND, for the Year ended 31st 
March 1906 - 4 

II.— ACCOUNT OF THE FAENBOROUGH FUND, for the same 

period _.,__. 4 

III,— ACCOUNT OF THE SWINEY FUND, for the same period - 6 

IV. -ACCOUNT OF TPIE BIRCH FUND, for the same perlo I - - 

v.— ACCOUNT OF THE BEQUEST OF THE LATE MR. VINCENT 

STUCKEY LEiN for the same period 8 

VI.— ACCOUNT OF THE BEQUEST OF THE LATE MR. CHARLES 

DRUEY EDWARD FORTNUM for the same period - - 8 

VII— RETURN of the Number of Peesons admitted to visit the 
British Museum and the British Museum (Natural 
History) in each Year from 1900 to 1905, both Years 
inclusive -------.---ii> 

VIII.— STATEMENT of General Progress at the Museum (Blocms- 

bury) 16. 

IX. — STATEMENT of Proukess made in the Arrangement and 

Description of the Collections, and Account of Objecis 20 
added to them, in the Year 1905 (Bloomsbury) ... 

X.— Ditto . - - ditto - - - (Natural History) - - - lOa 



A 2 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



I.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 





Cash. 


Stock, 
2| ^/o Consols. 






£. s. d. 


£. s. d. 




To Balances on the 1st April 1905 - 


277 12 1 


13,150 13 10 




- Dividends received on 13,150Z. 135. lO.'Z. 
Stock in 2i per Cent. Consols, 
bequeathed by the Earl of Bridge- 
water, viz. ; 








On the 5th April 1905 £. 82 3 10 








„ 5:;h July 1905 - 82 3 10 








„ 5th October 1905 - 82 3 10 








5th January 1906 - 82 3 10 


323 15 4 

28 6 - 






- Eent of a Real Estate, bequeathed by 
the Earl of Bridgewater (less cliarges of 
collection, repairs, ^c.) . - - - 






£. 


634 13 5 


13,150 13 10 





II. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 





Cash. 


Stock, 
2i% Consols. 






£. s. d. 


£. s. (1. 




To Balances ou ths 1st April 1905 - - - 


261 9 7 


2,879 10 7 




- Dividends received on ;',.879/. 10.?. Id. Stock 
in 2-|- per Cent. Consols, be- 
queathed by Lord Farnborough, 








VIZ.: 








On the 5th April 1905 £.17 19 11 








.5LhJuly 1805 - 17 19 11 








5th October n!05 • 17 19 11 








Bth January 1906 • 17 19 11 


71 19 8 






£. 


333 9 3 


2,879 10 7 





ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



BKIDGEWATER FUND, from the 1st April 1905 to the 31st March lt^06. 



By One Year's Salary of the Egerton Librarian - 
- Amount expended on purchase of Mannscr'pts 



Balances on the 31st March 1900, 
carried to Account for 1906-1907 



Cash, 


Stock, 

2\ °/o Consuls 


£. s. (1. 
175 - - 


£. s. <). 



21 18 6 



437 14 11 



634 13 5 



13,150 13 10 



13,150 13 10 



FARNBOROUGH FUND, from the 1st April 1905 to the 31st March 190r. 



By Balances on the 31st March 1900, 
carried to Account for 1906-1907 




£. I 333 9 3 



Stock, 
2i7„ Consols. 



£. i. d. 
2,870 10 7 



2,879 10 7 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BEITISH MUSEUM. 



Ill, — AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditure of the 





Cash. 


Stock, 
21 °/o Consols. 






£. s. d. 


&. s. d. 




To Balances on the 1st April! 905 - 


53 13 7 


5,683 1 6 




"- Dividends received on 5,683/. Is. &d. Stock 
in 2i per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by Dr. George Swiney for Lectures 
on Geology, viz.: 








On the 5th April 1905 - £. 35 10 4 








„ 5th July 1905 - 35 10 4 


' 






5th October 1905 - 35 10 4 








„ 5th January 1906 - 35 10 4 


142 1 4 










£. 


195 14 11 


5,683 1 6 





IV.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of 





Cash. 


Stock, 
2i°/o Consols. 






&.S. d. 






To Balance on the 1st April 1905 


- 


565 3 9 




- Dividends received on 565/. 35. 9^. Stock in 
24 per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by Dr. Birch in 1766, for the three 
Under Librarians of the British 
Museum, viz. : 








On the 5th April 1905 - £3 10 8 








5th July 1905 - 3 lo' 8 








„ 5th October 1905 - 3 10 8 








., 5th January 1906 - 3 10 8 


14 2 8 










£. 


14 2 8 


565 3 9 





ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



SWTNEY FUND, from the 1st April 1905 to the 31st March 1906. 



Cash. 



By Amount paid to Dr. J. S. Flett, for Lectures 
on Geology in 1905 . - . - - 



Advertisements — Vacancj^ in Swiney Lecture- 
ship _..■■.-. 



Balances on the 31st March 1906, 
carried to Account for 1900-1907 



£. s. d. 
140 - - 



5 8 10 



50 6 1 



Stock. 

2i^/<, Consols. 



£. s. cL 



5,6S3 I G 



195 14 11 5,683 1 6 



the BIKCH FUND, from the 1st April 1905 to the 31st March 1906. 



By Legacy paid to the three Under Librarians 
of the British Museum, whose offices 
existed in 1766, viz., the Keepers of the 
Departments of Printed Books, Manu- 
scripts and Natural History . . - 



Balance on the SIst Maech 1906, 
carried to Account for 1906-1907 



Cash. 



& s. 



14 2 



Stock, 
21% Consols. 



14 2 8 



565 3 9 



565 3 9 



ACCOUNTS, JiTC, OF THE BRITISH MUSEUiAI. 



v.— AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditure of the bequest 
and Extension of the Library and ileading-room of the British 





Cash. 


Local Loans 
Stock. 






£. s. d. 


£. s. d. 




To Amount of Local Loans Stock on 1st April 
1905 .... 





50,107 19 * 




- Dividends recei^ ed during the year 


1,520 5 - 






- AMOU^fT of Local Loans Stock purchased with 
the Dividends 


- 


1,524 7 7 




£. 


1,520 5 - 


51,632 6 11 





YI. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest 

1st April 1005 to 





Cash. 


Metropolitan 
H °/„ Stock. 






£. s. d. 


£. s. d. 




To Amount of Metrrpolitan 3.i per cent. Stock on 
lfctAprilJ9U5 - . . . 


- 


7,070 6 -i 




- Dividends received during ihe year 


250 10 6 






- Amount of Metropolitan 3| per cent. Stock 
purchased with the Dividends - 


- 


237 9 ^ 




£. 


250 10 6 


7,307 15 6 





ACCOU:v"TS, ETC.. Ub THE BiUTISH MUfSEUM. 



of the late MR. VINCEXT STUCKEY LEAN (for the Improvement 
Museum) from the 1st April 1905 to the 31st March 1906. 



By Amount expended in the purchase of 
1,524Z. 7.V. Id. Lccal Loans Sfock, Com- 
mission, &c. . . . 



Balance of Stock on the 31st March 1906 
carried to account for 1906-1907 




Local Loanr 
Stock. 



£. s. (I. 



51,632 6 11 
5L632 6 11 



of the late MR. CHARLES DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM from the 
the olst March 1906. 



By Amount expended in the purchase of 
2:;7?. 9>-. 'Sd. Metropolitan 3i ptr cent. 
Sloclc, Comnuission, &c. - - - 



Balance of Stock on the 31st March 1900 
carried to account for 1906-1907 



Cash. 



250 10 



250 10 6 



Metropolitan 

3i °/o Stock. 



£. .y. d. 



7,307 15 6 



7,307 15 6 



E. Mau7ide Tkompsfyn, 

Director and IVncipal Librarian. 



10 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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12 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The British Museum, Bloomsbury (including the Depart- 
ments of Printed Books and Maps, Manuscripts, Oriental 
Printed Books and Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, 
Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities, Greek and Roman 
Antiquities, British and Mediaeval Antiquities and Ethno- 
graphy, and Coins and Medals) is open to the public free 
daily (except on Good Friday and Christmas Day and days 
of Public Fast or Thanksgiving), as follows : — 



On Week-Days from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

After 4 p.m. in January, February, November, Decem- 
ber, and after 5 p.m. in March, September, October, only 
certain of the galleries remain open, viz. : — 



On Mondays ( Exhibitions of Manuscripts, Printed 
■\ti7t^t^xtt7cit^ A A-J I Books, Prints and Drawings, Porcelain, 

WEDNESDAYS, ^, o i\r • t -r. i • r^ • t^ -i.- i 

^ Glass & Majolica ; Prehistoric, British, 
j Anglo-Saxon, Mediseval and Ethnogra- 



and 



Fridays (^phical Collections. 



On Tifesdays f Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek and Roman 
Thursdays ' Galleries (exclusive of the Vase Rooms 
and Bronze Room); Gold Ornament 
Room, American Collections, and the 



and 



Saturdays Waddesdon Room. 



On Sunday Apternoons : — 

From 2 to 4 p.m. in January, February, November, 
December. 
„ 2 „ 5 „ „ October. 

„ 2 „ 5.30 „ „ March, September. 

6 ,, „ April, May, June, July, August. 



2 



Persons applying for the purposes of research and reference 
are admitted to the Reading Room under certain regulations 
every weekday, except the days specified below, from 9 a.m. 
until 7 p.m. The Newspaper Room is open, under similar 
regulations, from 10 a.m. until 4, .5, or 6 p.m., according to 
the season of the year. 



ACCOUNTS; ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 13 

The Reading Room, Newspaper Room, and Students' Rooms 
in the Library and Department of Manuscripts, are closed 
on Sundays, Good Friday, Christmas Day, and the first four 
weekdays in March and September. 

Other Students' Rooms are closed on Sundays, Good Friday, 
and Christmas Day, and occasionally for cleaning. 

Students are admitted generally to the several Departments, 
on weekdays, from 10 till 4 or 5 o'clock ; and to the Sculpture 
Galleries from 9 o'clock till the hour of closing, 

British Museum,) E. Maunde Thomi^son, 

31 March 1906./ Director and Principal Librarian. 



14 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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S-l ■'S 



S <u J5 P^^ 3 r- - 5' u o a; 














1ft 

i 


11,811 

4.968 

994 

1,939 




i 


11,824 

4,854 

909 

2,358 


lO 


05 


11,627 
4,601 
1,541 
2,108 


1^ 


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1 


12,813 
4,573 
1,295 
2,392 


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11,923 
4,447 
1,314 
2,380 


(M 






Zoology- 
Geology - 

Mineralogv - - - 
Botany -' 

Total - 











ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 15 

The Exhibition Galleries of the British Museum (Natural 
History), Cromwell-road, South Kensington, including the 
Departments of Zoology, Geology and Palaeontology, Mine- 
ralogy, and Botany, are open to the public, free, daily, 
except Good Friday and Christmas Day, and days of Public 
Fast 01' Thanksgiving. 



The hours of Admission are as under : — 

On Week-Days, throughout the year from 10 a.uK, in 

- to 



January - - - . 

February 

March _ _ . . 

April to August 

September 

October - - - ■ 

November and December 



4 p.m. 

4.30 

5.30 

6 

5.30 

5 



also, on Mondays and Saturdays only, from the 
beginning of May to the middle of July, to 8 p.m., and from 
the middle of Jul}^ to the end of August, to 7 p.m. 



On Sundays, in 

January - - _ . from 2 to 4 p.m. 

February - ^ - - „ 2 ,,4.30 

March - - - - „ 2 „ 5.30 

April - - - - „ 2 „ 6 

May to August - - - „ 2.30 „ 7 

September - - - „ 2 „ 5.30 

October ---.,, 2 „ 5 

November and December - ,,2 „ 4 



Persons are admitted to study in these Departments every 
weekday from 10 till 4 o'clock. 



British Museum (Nat'iiral Histor}^), 1 E. Ray Lankester, 

24 February 1906. / Director. 



IG ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

VIII.— General Progress at the Museum, Bloomsbury. 

A serious fall in the number of visits to the Museum 
during the year 1905 has to be recorded. In recent years 
the numbers have been steadily increasing, and in 1904 they 
reached the large total of 954,4-H. There has now been a 
reaction, with a loss of upwards of 140,000 ; the number for 
the year being 813,659. It is impossible to account for such 
fluctuations ; but it is to be observed that the reduction took 
place in the latter half of the year and on weekdays, the 
attendance on Sundays being larger than that in 1904. 

The number of visits of students to the Reading Room 
has also diminished slightly, the number for 1905 being 
214,940, as against 226,323 in 1904; a daily average of 711. 

The average numbers of persons in the room, counted at 
the later hours of the afternoon, were : — 




The number of visHs of students to particular Depart- 
ments in 1905 was 57,557, as against 58,109 in 1904 ; a 
reduction of 552, due chiefly to the smaller number of visits 
to the Department of British and Mediaeval Antiquities. 

The excavations which have been in progress since 1903 
on the site of ancient Nineveh were brought to a close in 
February 1905. The mound of Kouyuujik has now been 
fully explored, testing trenches having been cut in all 
directions in order to be sure that no remains have been 
overlooked. The principal recent discovery is the site of 
the Temple of Nabu, the War God. The ruins were cleared, 
but the building had been so utterly destroyed and burnt, 
presumably by the Elamites at the capture of the city, that 
it was not possible even to make a complete plan of it. The 
library of tablets, which it probably contained, must have 
been entirely destroyed. So thorough, indeed, was the 
destruction of the city by the conquerors, to judge from the 
condition of the remains, that the preservation of the collec- 
tion of tablets now in the Museum, and forming only a part 
of the great library of Sennacherib and Ashur-bani-pal, must 
be attributed to some accidental falling in of debris, which 
thus covered them and saved them from the enemy. 

The excavations on the site of the Temple of Artemis at 
Ephesus were brought to a close on the l7th of June. The 
result of the two seasons' excavations is as follows : —The 
remains of four temples superimposed one on another have 
been examined. Taking these temples in order, from the 
latest to the earliest, they are : 1. The temple of the middle 
of the 4th century B.C., which was the main object of Mr. 
J. T. Wood's exploration. Mr. Wood removed almost every 
relic of it, and his work proves to have been very thorough. 
The remains which he discovered are those now' in the 
British Museum. 2. The temple builr in the middle of 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. l7 

the Gth century B.C., usually associated with the name of 
Croesus, was the original object of the recent exploration. 
This temple was only touched by Wood. The whole area of 
the surviving platform has now been cleared, and, from the 
numerous fragments recovered, an architectural restoration 
of all except the architraves will be possible. 3. The third 
temple, the existence of which has been hitherto unsuspected, 
was very little below the level of the one above and was of 
smaller area. Only small traces of it remain, and its period 
of existence was probably short. 4. Of the lowest and 
earliest temple, the structure of what may have been the 
naos or statue-base alone remains. The lowest blocks of 
this structure are laid on the virgin sand. It was here that 
numerous objects of gold, ivory, &c. were found. From 
the style of these objects it is inferred that the period of 
this earliest temple was probably not earlier than the 
7th century B.C. The work was much impeded by abnor- 
mally heavy rains. 

The repository built at Hendon for the storage of ^"news- 
papers and other printed matter having been completely 
fitted with book-presses, the collections of English provincial 
newspapers and of Scottish and Irish newspapers, consisting 
of 48,000 volumes, have been removed thither. By special 
arrangement, the papers are made available to Readers on 
notice being given. 

The Exhibition Gallery of the Prints and Drawings and 
the Glass and Ceramic Gallery and English Ceramic Ante- 
Room have been re-painted. 

The planing and polishing of the wooden flooring of the 
Upper Floor of the Museum has been further extended to 
various rooms ; the floor of the Ethnographical Gallery alone 
remaining to be dealt with. 

An improvement has been effected in the service of the 
Reading Room by widening the gangway used for the 
delivery of books from the Library. 

An exhibition of Mezzotint Portraits, selected chiefly 
from the collection bequeathed to the Trustees by the late 
Lord Cheylesmore, has been arranged in the Department of 
Prints and Drawings. 

In the King's Library a temporary exhibition, illustrating 
the history of the British Navy and commemorating the 
Nelson Centenary, is displayed, consisting of manuscripts, 
autographs, books, prints, and medals selected from the 
collections. 

Among the more important additions to the several 
Departments the following may be specially noticed : — 

The Department of Printed Books has acquired a series 
of rare English and Scottish books printed before the year 
1640. Among other rare books, the most notable is a copy 
of the second edition of the Latin-German Dictionary known 
as the '•' Vocabularius ex quo," printed at Eltville near Mainz, 
in 1469, with type which owed its origin to the famous 
printer Gutenberg, 

124. « 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BIIITISH MUSEUM. 

The Department of Manuscripts has received, by bequest 
from the late Mr. Charles Alban Buckler, a valuable series 
of architectural drawings of English Cathedrals and other 
buildings ; and, by gift from Major-General H. P. Babbage, 
correspondence and papers of Charles Babbage, f.r.s., the 
mathematician. Among the principal purchases are several 
collections of historical and diplomatic papers of the 17th, 
18th, and early 19th centuries. 

The Department of Oriental Printed Books and Manu- 
scripts has secured several rare Arabic MSS. of the 12th, loth, 
and 14th centuries. 

The Department of Prints and Drawings has benefited 
by many donations of drawings of the Old Masters and 
engravings, presented by Mr. Max Rosenheim, Mr. H. J. 
Pfungst, Mr. E. E. Leggat, and others. 

The most conspicuous addition to the Department of 
Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities is the sculptured wall 
from the chapel of the pyramid, in the island of Meroe, of a 
Queen Candace of the 1st or 2nd century, presented by the 
Government of the Sudan. Among the purchases are a series 
of rare Egyptian scarabs, dating from about 3500 to 650 B.C. ; 
a collection of upwards of six hundred Babylonian inscribed 
tablets of about 2400 B.C. ; and a valuable series of Babylonian 
cylinder seals. 

By gift from the Marquess of Sligo, the Department of 
Greek and Roman Antiquities has received the greater part of 
the two flanking columns of the doorway of the Treasury of 
Atreus at Mycense. These have been supplemented by casts 
of other fragments, presented chiefly by the Greek Govern- 
ment ; and a restoration of the structure has been built up in 
the room of Archaic Greek sculpture. 

Among the varied acquisitions of the Department of 
British and Mediaeval Antiquities and Ethnography the most 
notable are : a collection of jewellery and other objects from 
Anglo-Saxon graves in Kent, presented through the National 
Art Collections Fund ; a series of Merovingian remains from 
Herpes, near Angouleme ; Tibetan collections from Lhasa 
and other places in Tibet (pp. 85, 86) ; and an important 
ethnographical series from Sarawak in Borneo. 

To the Department of Coins and Medals have been added 
an interesting series of rare Greek Coins of Olbia and Tyra 
in Sarmatia ; a series of rare English and other historical 
medals of the 17th and 18th centuries ; and three pattern 
crown-pieces of Cromwell and Charles XL, in perfect condi- 
tion, bequeathed by the late Mr. C. E. G. Mackerel!. 

In this year also the Government of India presented to 
the Trustees a very important series of Tibetan manuscripts, 
books, and objects of antiquity and curiosity, chosen from 
the collections formed during the recent expedition to Lhasa. 
Owing to delay connected with identification, the several 
objects were not incorporated at once among the Museum 
collections. A description of the series is therefore postponed 
until the Return for 1906. 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 19' 

Gifts of Museum publications, including reproductions of 
prints and drawings by Old Masters and sets of electrotypes 
of British Historical Medals, have been made to Free 
Libraries, Local Museums, and Art Schools throughout the 
United Kingdom, and to institutions in various Colonies. 

The following are the publications issued by the Depart- 
ments at Bloomsbury during the year : — 

Supplement to the General Catalogue of the Library, 
quarto, 4 parts, viz.: "V — Uzul " ; " Whitechapel — Wzl " ; 
" X — Zyromski" ; and " Newspapers." 

Catalogue of Accessions to the Library, quarto, 26 parts. 

Catalogue of Music Accessions. Part XIV. 

Cuneiform Texts from Babylonian Tablets, fee, in the 
British Museum, Part XXL, 50 photo-lithographic plates 
1905. Foolscap, boards, 7s. 6d. 

The Treasure of the Oxus, with other objects from Ancient 
Persia and India. (Franks Bequest.) By O. M. Dalton. 
With 29 plates, map and 81 illustrations. 1905. Quarto, 
cloth, 21s. ; half-vellum, 25s. 

Catalogue of the Hebrew and Samaritan MSS. in the 
British Museum. By G. Margoliouth. Part IL, with 10 plates. 
1905. Quarto, 3^. 15s. 

Catalogue of the Coptic MSS. in the British Museum. 
By W. E. Crum. With 15 plates. 1905. Quarto, 4>l. 10s. 

Catalogue of Japanese Printed Books and MSS. in the 
British Museum, acquired during the years 1899-1903. By 
Sir Kobert K. Douglas. 1905. Quarto, 10s. 

Medallic Illustrations of the History of Great Britain 
and Ireland. Parts III. and IV. Plates XXL-XXX. and 
XXXI.-XL. 1905. Folio, Gs. each part. 

Catalogue of the Collection of English Porcelain in the 
British Museum. By R. L. Hobson. With 39 plates and 
104 illustrations. 1905. Quarto, 21s. 

Reproductions of Piints. New Series. Part XIV. 
(Specimens of line-engraving by English Masters of the 
eighteenth century.) 11 plates. 1905. 21. 

A Guide to the Exhibition Galleries of the British Museum 
(Bloomsbury). Sixth edition, revised. With plans. 1905. 
Octavo, 2d. 

A Guide to the Antiquities of "the Early Iron Age in the 
Department of British and MedijBval Antiquities. With 
7 plates and 147 illustrations. 1905. Octavo, Is. 

A Guide to an Exhibition of Mezzotint Engravings, chiefly 
from the Cheylesmore Collection. 1905. Octavo, od. 

A. Guide to the Naval Exhibition — Nelson Centenary. 
With 8 plates. 1905. Octavo, 6d. 

British Museum,] E. Maunde Thompson, 

31 March, 1906. / Director and Principal Librarian » 



124. 



20*' ACCOUNTS, ETC., OP THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

IX.— PROGRESS made in the Arrangement and 
Description of the Collections, and Account 
OF Objects added to them in the Year 1905 
(Bloomsbury). 



Department of Printed Books. 

I. Arrangevient. — The works added to the collection during 
the past year have, as far as possible, been placed on the 
shelves of the Library according to the system of classifica- 
tion adopted in the Museum. 

The press-marks, indicating their respective localities, have 
been marked on the inside and affixed to the back of each 
volume. 

The total number of these press-marks amounts to 
78,589 ; in addition to which 41,476 press-marks have been 
altered in consequence of changes and re-arrangements 
carried out in the Library ; 39,794 labels have been affixed 
to books and volumes of newspapers, and 109,893 obliterated 
labels have been renewed. 

The process of attaching third-marks to the books in the 
New Library, with the view of accelerating their delivery 
to readers, has been continued; 15,657 books have been 
thus marked during the year, and the corresponding altera- 
tions, amounting to 91,471, have been carried out in the 
General and Hand Catalogues ; and 1,199 index-slips have 
been written for London Newspapers. 

The work of collecting together and re- arranging the 
Incunabula in glazed cases has been completed. Future 
acquisitions will be arranged on the same system. 

The number of stamps impressed upon the articles received 
has been 405,154. 

2,819 presses of books and newspapers have been dusted in 
the course of the year. 

II. Catalogues. — (a) Cataloguing.— '^d, Sol titles have 
been written (the term "title" applying equally to a main- 
title and to a cross-reference). Of these, 35,576 were written 
for the General Catalogue, 2,684 for the Map Catalogue, and 
11,591 for the Music Catalogue. 

(6) PHw^iw^r.— 34,693 titles and 988 index-slips for the 
General Catalogue, and 4,802 for the Map Catalogue have 
been prepared for printing during the year; 34,992 titles 
and 990 index-slips for the General Catalogue, 7,825 titles 
for a Catalogue of British Newspapers, 8,489 titles for 
a Catalogue of the " Thomason Tracts," and 15,245 titles for 
the Music Catalogue have been printed. 



DEPARTMENT OP PRINTED BOOKS. 21 

The printing of the Supplement to the General Catalogue 
has been completed. This Supplement contains the titles of 
all such b(ioks as were added to the Library during the years 
1882-1899, but were not incorporated in the Catalogue during 
the process of printing. Three printed parts, containing the 
headings under W, Pt. 2, X, Y, and Z, have been delivered by 
the printer in the course of the year. 

(c) Incorporation. — General Catalogue. — ^5,148 title- 
slips and 986 index-slips have been incorporated into each 
of the three copies of this Catalogue. This incorporation has 
rendered it necessary, in order to maintain as far as possible 
the alphabetical arrangement, to remove and re-insert 44,65.3 
title-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 1,039 new 
leaves. 

The system of fortnightly incorporation of accessions 
to the Library has been carried out with perfect regularity 
during the past year. 

Hand Catalogues. — The number of new entries made 
in the Hand Catalogue of " Academies " was 393 ; in that 
of " Periodical Publications," 528 ; in that of " Maps and 
Charts," 626 ; in that of Music, 884 ; and in that of London 
Newspapers, 1,199. 

(d) Map Catalogue. — 2,684 titles have been written for the 
Map Catalogue, and 171 title-slips have been incorporated 
into the Reading Room copy. This incorporation has rendered 
it necessary to remove and re-insert 3,404 title-slips in the 
same copy and to add 170 new leaves. 

(e) Music Catalogue. — 11,591 titles have been written for 
the Music Catalogue, and 15,239 title-slips have been incorpo- 
rated into each of the two copies of it. This incorporation 
has rendered it necessary to remove and j-e-insert 28,577 title- 
slips in each copy and to add to each copy 502 new leaves. 

(/) Shelf Catalogue. — For this Catalogue, in which the 
title-slips, mounted on cards, are arranged in order of press- 
marks, about 34,000 have been so mounted and about 126,300 
have been incorporated in their proper order. 

{g) Catalogues of Books of Reference in the Reading Room. 
— The additions and alterations in each of the four inter- 
leaved copies of the Catalogue of Books of Reference in the 
Reading Room, which are requisite in order to record the 
changes in this collection by the addition of new works and 
the substitution of new for earlier editions, have been made : 
the number of such additions amounts to 200. Two copies of 
the two volumes of this Catalogue have been laid down on 
420 new leaves and bound in four new volumes, the necessary 
manuscript alterations in the Catalogue (about 5,000) having 
previously been made. 

c 2 



22: ACCOUNTS, ETC., OJ?' THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Additions have also been made to the collection of books 
in the Galleries of the Reading Room by the incorporation of 
new works of interest and importance, and by the substitution 
of new for earlier editions. The number of such additions 
amounts to 86. 

III. Binding. — The number of volumes and sets of 
pamphlets sent to be bound in the course of the year was 
11,715, including 4,210 volumes of newspapers. In conse- 
quence of the frequent adoption of the plan of binding two 
or more volumes in one, the number of volumes returned 
was 9,631 ; in addition to which 29 volumes have been 
repaired in the binders' shops. 

Besides this, the following binding work has been done 
in the Library itself : — 6,871 volumes have been repaired ; 
155 broadsides, &c., have been inserted in guard-books, and 
4,448 volumes of reports, parts of periodicals, &c., have been 
bound in a light style of binding. 

The following maps, charts, &c., have also been bound or 
mounted during the year : — 59 atlases and 40 volumes of the 
25-inch Ordnance Survey have been bound ; 107 maps have 
been mounted on linen, and 18 on cards ; and one portfolio, 
6 cases and 79 boxes have been made to contain maps. 

29,787 numbers of Colonial Newspapers have been folded 
into 521 parcels, and 516 such parcels have been tied up and 
labelled preparatory to being bound. 

35 volumes of the Blue Copy of the General Catalogue, 
2 volumes of the Red Copy and 11 of the Green Copy have 
been broken up and rebound in 90 new volumes. Also, 309 
columns and 1,703 titles have been re-laid in each of the 
three interleaved copies of the General Catalogue : a process 
rendered necessary by the accumulation of titles under 
certain headings. 

Four copies of the Newspaper Catalogue, containing 538 
columns, have been laid down and bound in 6 volumes each ; 
while one copy has been interleaved with cartridge paper and 
bound in 11 volumes for the Hendon Repository. 

ly. Reading Room Service. — The number of volumes 
replaced in the General Library after use in the Reading 
Room was .872,274; in the King's Library, 25,387; in the 
Grenville Library, 1,627 ; in the Map Room, 5,685 ; in the 
presses in which books are kept from day to day for the use 
of readers, 694,197; and in the Oriental Department, 393; 
making a total amount of 1,599,562 volumes supplied to 
readers during the year, exclusive of those to which the 
readers have personal access on the shelves of the Reading 
Room. 

The number of readers during the year was 214,940, giving 
an average of over 711 daily, the room having been open on 
302 days ; with an average of over seven volumes daily 
for each reader. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 23 

Newspaper Room. — The number of readers during the 
year has been 21,857, giving a daily average of over 72, the 
room having been open on 302 days. The number of volumes 
replaced after use was 59,851, giving a daily average of 19S 
and of over two volumes to each reader, not reckoning 
volumes, chiefly Parliamentary Papers, taken from the shelves 
of the Newspaper Room by the readers themselves. 

Map Room. — 286 visitors have been admitted to the Map 
Room for the purpose of special geographical research. 

Photography. — There have been 337 applications for leave 
to photograph from books in the Library ; 734 volumes have 
been thus used, three negatives per volume being the average 
number of negatives made ; and 872 hours have been spent 
by members of the staff in attendance on photographers. 

V. Accessions. — (a) 31,752 volumes and pamphlets (includ- 
ing 129 atlases, &c., and 1,939 books of music) have been added 
to the Library in the course of the year. Of these, 5,949 
were presented ; 16,329 received under the provisions of 
the Copyright Act ; 485 by Colonial Copyright ; 684 by 
International Exchange ; and 8,805 by purchase. 

(6) 64,069 parts of volumes (or separate numbers of 
periodical publications and of works in progress) have also 
been added to the Library. Of these, 2,258 were presented, 
39,653 received under the provisions of the Copyright Act ; 
1,045 by Colonial Copyright ; 265 by International Exchange ; 
and 20,848 by purchase. 

(c) 1,275 maps in 8,508 sheets have been added to the 
collection in the course of the year. Of these, 450 maps in 
1,328 sheets were presented ; 641 maps in 6,594 sheets were 
received under the provisions of the Copyright Act ; 86 maps 
in 88 sheets, by Colonial Copyright ; and 98 maps in 498 
sheets were acquired by purchase. 

(d) 8,222 Musical Publications have been added to the 
collection. Of these, 7,305 were received under the provisions 
of the Copyright Act ; 580 by Colonial Copyright ; and 337 
acquired by purchase. 

(e) The number of newspapers published in the United 
Kingdom, received under the provisions of the Copy- 
right Act during the year, has been 3,331, comprising 228,638 
single numbers. 1,199 of these newspapers were published 
in London and its suburbs ; 1,602 in other parts of England 
and Wales and in the Channel Islands ; 293 in Scotland ; 
and 237 in Ireland. 255 sets, containing 35,525 numbers of 
colonial and foreign newspapers, have been presented ; and 
84 sets, containing 12 volumes and 15,263 numbers of current 
colonial and foreign newspapers, have been purchased. 

(/) 3,965 articles not included in the foregoing paragraphs 
have been received in the Department. These consist of 
Broadsides, Parliamentary Papers, and other miscellaneous 
items. 



24 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The total number of articles enumerated above, as having 
been received in the- Department during the past year, 
exclusive of newspapers, is 109,283. 

Acquisitions of Special Interest. — Ninety English and 
Scotch books printed before the year 1640, and forty-two 
foreign Incunabula, have been acquired during the year 1905. 

Among the English books the most interesting are : — 

Basille, Theodore, i.e., Thomas Becon : "A Christmas 
Banket garnished with many pleasant and dainty dishes. By 
Theodore Basille." Printed by John Mayler for John Gough, 
London, 1542. 

" The Order of the Greate Turckes Court." R. Grafton, 
London, 1542. This book is mentioned by Dibdin, but no 
other copy has been discovered. 

" An Almanacke and Pronostication of Jaspar Laet, anno 
1546." Printed by John Herford, 1545. Hitherto unknown. 
Taken from a binding. 

Bale, John, Bishop of Ossory : " The seconde parte of 
the Image of both Churches." Printed in 1549 or 1550. No 
copy of the first part of this book is recorded. The present 
is the only copy of the second part known. 

" Disputatio inter clericum et militem super potestate 
Prelatis Ecclesiae atque Principibus terrarum commissa." 
Thomas Berthelet, London, about 1550. 

Virgilius : "Opera." H. Bynneman, London, 1570. 
Believed to be the first edition of Yirgil's works printed 
in England. 

Vegetius, Flavins: "The foure Bookes of Martiall 
Policye." Thomas Marshe, London, 1572. With several 
woodcuts. 

Yates, James : " The Castle of Courtesie " and " The 
Hould of Humilitie." Two books printed by John Wolfe, 
London, 1582. 

Valdes, Francisco de : "A Dialogue of the Office of a 
Sergeant Major." J. Wolfe, London, 1590. 

Sidney, Sir Philip : " The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia. 
The Second Edition." W. Ponsonbie, London, 1593. The 
first edition, printed in 1590, and the third in 1598, are 
already in the Library. For this second edition the emble- 
matical title-page used in later editions and in other books 
was designed. 

" Regimen Sanitatis Salerni. The School e of Salerne." 
Benj. Alsop, London, 1617. This appears to be the only 
printed English translation of the Regimen of the School of 
Salerno. 

" The Laws or Standing Orders of the East India Com- 
pany, 1621." The earliest edition of the Regulations of the 
East India Company at present in the Library was published 
in 1700 or 1701. 

" Ecclesiae Gemitus sub Anabaptistica Tyrannide." Printed 
in 1649 and bearing the imprint " ^rae Martyrii Caroli anno 
primo." 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 25 

" Prayers of Intercession for their Use who mourn in 
secret for the publique Calamities of this Nation." Printed 
in 1659, containing Prayers for Charles II. and Queen 
Henrietta Maria and an " Anniversary Prayer " for the 
30th January. 

A considerable number of books printed in Scotland or 
bearing upon Scotch history have been added to the Library 
during the year. Among these the following are of special 
interest : — 

" Elegie nuptiale presentee a Princesse Magdaleine le 
lendemain de ses nopces avec le Roy d'Escoce." Printed in 
1536. Madeleine, eldest daughter of Francis I. of France, 
married James V. of Scotland on the 1st January 1537, and 
died shortly after landing in Scotland, in July of the same 
year. 

Knox, John : " Epistle anto the inhabitants of Newcastle 
and Barwicke." Geneva, 1559. 

Barnestaple, 0. : L'histoire et vie de Marie Stuart. Com- 
posee en Latin et faicte fran^oise." Paris, 1589. 

" Actes of Parliament past seen the Coronation of the 
King, 1567-1592 in furtherance of the progress of the true 
Religion." R. Waldegrave, Edinburgh, 1593. 

Two editions of the " Book of Common Order of the 
Church of Scotland," the first printed by Richard Schilders, 
Middelburg, 1594, the second by Andrew Hart, Edinburgh, 
1611. 

" Articles concerning the Authoritie of Justices within 
the Kingdome of Scotland." Edinburgh, 1612. 

"A Forme of Prayer" (Set forth to be used on the 
5th August as a Thanksgiving for the escape of James VI. 
from the Gowrie Conspiracy in the year 1600). B. Norton 
and J. Bill, London, 1618. 

" Protestation of the General Assemblie and of the 
Subscribers of the Covenant lately renewed in the High 
Kirk and Mercate Cross of Glasgow, November, 1638." 
George Anderson, Gla.sgow, 1638. The first book known to 
have been printed at Glasgow. The printer, George 
Anderson, before this date had a press in Edinburgh. 

"Poems." J. Ballantyne, Edinburgh, 1803. In this volume 
appeared anonymously the first issue of Thomas Campbell's 
" Lochiel " and " Hohenlinden." 

The following are the most interesting among the 
Incunabula and other foreign books acquired during the 
year : — 

A copy of the second edition of the Latin-German 
Dictionary commonly known as the " Vocabularius ex quo." 
Printed by Nicolaus Bechtermiinze at Eltville near Mainz, 
1469. This book is specially interesting on account of its 
connection with Johann Gutenberg, who after his severance 



26 A.CCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

from Johann Fust is believed to have cut for himself a small 
type, with which he printed in 1460 an edition of the 
" Catholicon," of Balbus Januensis. Shortly after printing 
this book, Gutenberg sold bis press and types ; the type 
which he used in printing the " Catholicon " passing into the 
hands of Heinrich Bechtermiinze, who set up a press at 
Eltville in 1467. Here, he printed two books " De Articulis 
Fidei " of Thomas Aquinas and the " Vocabularius ex quo." 
In the course of printing the lattei- Heinrich died, and the 
work was completed by his brother Nicolaus Bechtermiinze, 
who eighteen months later produced a second edition, still 
using Gutenberg's types. The work now acquired is a copy 
of this second edition. 

Aeneas Sylvius (Pope Pius II.) : "De Duobus Amantibus." 
Printed by Adam Rot at Rome, about 1472. 

Schick, M. : A Treatise on medicated waters, perfumes, 
&c. Printed by Johann Bamler at Augsburg, 1477. 

Quintus Curtius : " Historia Alexandri Magni." Printed 
by Pedro Posa at Barcelona, 1481. The first production of 
this printer at Barcelona. 

Pico della Mirandola, Giovanni : " Apologia." Printed 
by E. Silber at Rome, 1487. 

" Sermones Thesauri novi de Sanctis." Printed by Martin 
Flach, at Cologne, 1488. 

Matthaeus Bendinellus : " Tractatus de balneis lucen- 
sibus." Printed by Sigismund Rodt at Pescia, 1489. A press 
hitherto unrepresented in the Library. 

An Itinerary from Paris to Rome. Printed at Paris, 
about 1490. One of a set of three Itineraries, of which two 
are already in the Library. 

Niger, Franciscus : " Ars Epistolandi." Printed by Pedro 
Posa at Barcelona, 1494. 

Bradwardine, Thomas, Archbishop of Canterbury : 
" Arithmetica." Printed by Gui Marchand at Paris, 1495. 

Pico della Mirandola, Giovanni Francesco, the Younger : 
" Liber de veris calamitatum causis nostrorum temporum." 
Printed by Joannes Mazochius at Mirandola, 1519. The first 
book printed at Mirandola. 

Hurtado de Mendoza, Diego : " Tragedia llamada la 
Madre Claudina." Printed at Toledo, L548. The only 
known copy of this edition. 

Roederer, P. L. : " (Euvres du Comte P. L. Roederer, 
publiees par son fils le baron A. M. Roederer," 8 vols. Paris, 
1854. A small number of copies of this book were 
privately issued. The value of the work consists in the 
notes taken by Count Roederer of words uttered in con- 
versation and on public occasions by Napoleon I., during the 
Consulate and Empire. These notes, which are of great 
interest and importance, are to be found only in Vol. III. of 
the book. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 27 

A few books in bindings of special interest and value 
have been added to the Library during the year. 

Among these are : — 

"The Works of King Charles the Martyr," London, 
1G52. In a finely tooled contemporary English binding. 

" The Art of Tonnage and Poundage," London, 1702. 
With the Arms of Queen Anne on the binding. No example 
of a binding bearing the Arms of; Queen Anne has hitherto 
been in the British Museum. The acquisition of this book 
completes the collection of English Royal Armorial bindings 
from Henry VIII. to the present time. 

Donations. — Among the many Donations with which 
the Library has been enriched during the year 1905 are 
the following : — 

Rossetti, Gabriele : " II Mistero dell' Amor platonico del 
medio evo," 5 vol. London, 1840. 

A presentation copy to the Right Hon. John Hookham 
Frere, containing many MS. notes by him. Presented by 
Paget Toynhee, Esq. 

"Wintertage auf Ithaka," by H.I. and R.H. the Archduke 
Ludwig Salvator, Prague, 1904. Presented by the Archduke. 

"Zante," by H.I. and R.H. the Archduke Ludwig 
Salvator, Prague, 1904. Presented by the Archduke. 

" Le Galerie de Tableaux de Monsieur Rodolphe Kann a 
Paris." Paris, 1905. Presented by Monsieur Rodolphe Kann. 

" Une Croisiere au Spitzberg. Yacht Maroussia," 1904. 
Presented by H.R.H. the Duke d' Orleans. 

''Chantilly. Le Cabinet des Livres," Paris, 1905, and 
" Le Triomphe et les Gestes de Monseigneur Anne de Mont- 
morency. Poeme de Jean de Luxembourg." Paris, 1904. 

Presented by Monsieur L''opold Delisle. 

" Armorial des Princes du Sang royal de Hainaut et de 
Brabant." Paris, 1905. Presented hy Prince Edouard de 
Block. 

" Lavori in ferro battuto di pubblici e privati Edifici in 
Vicenza, 1905." Presented by the Munici'pality of Vicenza. 

"Richard Wagner. Engraved throughout by Mr. Allan 
Wyon for the Honourable Mrs. Burrell on specially manu- 
factured paper, with watermark facsimile of Richard 
Wagner's autograph signature." One hundred copies only 
printed. Presented by Mrs. J. Henniker-Heaton. 

A collection of Newspapers published in the British 
Colonies during the year 1904, in continuation of the series 
previously presented. Presented by the Royal Colonial 
Institute. 



28 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Maps. — The most important additions to the collection of 
Maps have been : — 

Three Maps by G. Tatton, engraved by Benjamin Wright. 
The first, of the Pacific, dated 1600, showing the recent 
discoveries of Sir Francis Drake ; the second of California 
and Mexico, 1616 ; the third of Canada, about the same date. 

" Atlas Terrestris. A collection of choice Mapps of all 
the world, by John Seller," about 1680. 

A large plan of London by John Rocque, 1746, in four 
parts, the whole measuring 12 ft. 8 in. by 6 ft. 8 in. 

Sixteen of the " Maps of the Counties of England by 
C. and H. Greenwood," scale 1 in. to the mile. These complete 
'the Museum set of these Maps, which were published between 
1815 and 18.30. 

Music. — The most interesting additions to the collections 
of Music have been : — 

Monte, Filippo di : " Secondo Libro di Madrigali spirituali 
a sei Voci." Venice, 1589. 

Dering, Richard, Organist to Queen Henrietta Maria : 
" Cantiones Sacrae quinque Vocum." Antwerp, 1634. 

Abell, John : " A Choice Collection of Italian Ayres." 
London, 1703. 

Richardson, William : " Lessons for the Harpsichord." 
London, 1708. 

Meyerbeer, Giacomo : A copy of the full score of 
*' L'Africaine," 1865. 

0. K. Fortescue. 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 29 



Department of Manuscripts. 

1. Catalogue of Additions. — All the MSS. acquired in 
1905, viz., Additional 37022-372.32, and Egerton 285.3-2861, 
have been described and indexed. The descriptions have also 
been revised. 

The descriptions of Charters and Seals for the Sexennial 
Catalogue have been completed and indexed. 

2. Catalogue of Papyri. — The preparation of descriptions, 
transcripts, annotations, &c., has been continued for Vol. III., 
the printing of which has advanced to sheet K. 

3. Catalogue of the Royal MSS. — One hundred and thirty- 
six MSS. in the Royal collection have been described for the 
new Catalogue in progress. 

4. Catalogue of Music. — Sheets 2D-2H (end of text) of 
Vol. I. (Sacred Vocal Music) have been printed off, and the 
volume has been indexed. Index I. (Initial Words and Titles) 
has been printed, and the slips of Index II. (Names and 
Subjects) have gone to press. Sheets B-X of Vol. II. (Secular 
Vocal Music) have been printed off. 

5. Catalogue of Romances. — Progress has been made in 
the preparation of Vol. III. 

6. Catalogue of Charters. — The descriptions of Additional 
Charters 29526-30000, 34313-36000, 40961-45797, and 
Egerton Charters 586-621, acquired in 1887-1900, have been 
revised, and the Charters have been indexed. 

Additional Charters 47708-47733 (acquired in 1903), and 
53116-53120 (acquired in 1904), have been described and 
indexed. 

The revision of the Index-slips of Religious Houses and 
other Corporate Bodies of all the old Collections of Charters 
and of the later acquisitions down to 1881 inclusive has 
been completed. The slips of topographical entries from 
Additional and Egerton Charters acquired in 1882-1900 have 
been partially revised for incorporation with the above, to 
form Vol. II. of the General Index of Charters. Letter A is 
ready for press. 

7. Class Catalogue of MSS. — The printed descriptions of 
MSS. acquired in 1904 have been incorporated. 

8. Binding. — Two hundred and seventy-four Additional 
MSS. newly acquired and one hundred and eighteen MSS. 
of the old Collections have been bound or repaired. 

Eight hundred and eleven Additional Charters and Rolls 
have been repaired. 

Forty-one Books of Reference and Catalogues have been 
bound or repaired. 

Twenty-six Papyri have been bound and glazed. 



30 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

9. Verification. — The entire collection of MSS. has been 
verified by comparison with the Shelf-Lists. 

10. Exhibitions. — A special exhibition of MSS. illustrating 
the history of the British Navy has been arranged in con- 
nection with the Nelson Centenary, and a Guide to it has 
been printed. 

The General Collection of MSS. exhibited to the public 
has been re-arranged, and the new Guide is being prepared. 

11. Stamping, folioing, and placing. — Four hundred 
and fifty-four Additional MSS., six hundred and ninety-four 
Charters and Rolls, and one hundred and forty-four Books 
of Reference have been stamped, with a total of 20785 
impressions. 

One hundred and seventy-nine MSS. have been f olio'd, with 
a total of 39934 folios. Index-slips to the number of 25050 
have also been folio'd. 

One hundred and sixty-nine MSS. have been placed, press- 
marked, and entered in the Hand- and Shelf-Lists ; and 
two hundred and ninety-eight Charters and Rolls have 
been placed and entered in the Inventory. Numbers have 
been written on one thousand eight hundred and fourteen 
Charters and Rolls. 

Two hundred and eight Seals and Casts have been pro- 
vided with boxes, placed and entered in the Inventory. 

12. Books of Reference. — One hundred and eighty-four 
volumes and parts have been received, catalogued and 
placed. 

13. Consultation of MSS. — The number of MSS. consulted 
in the Students' Room attached to the Department was 31103, 
and of those delivered in the Reading Room 408. 

The number of Charters, Rolls and Seals consulted was 
3582. 

The number of Students working in the Department was 
10623. 

Magna Charta was exhibited to 6958 visitors. 

14. MSS. photograjyhed, — Five hundred and fifty MSS. 
(including Charters and Seals) were allowed to be photo- 
graphed, with a total of 1527 photographs taken. Approxi- 
mately 358 hours were spent by members of the stafif in 
attendance on photographers. 

15. Acquisitions. — The number of Manuscripts and Docu- 
ments, &c., acquired during the year has been : — 

General Collection of MSS. - - - - 211 

Egerton MSS. ------ 9 

Charters and Rolls - 300 

Detached Seals and Casts _ - _ _ 2O8 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 31 

The most important public sales of MSS. during the year 
were mainly confined to autograph letters and historical 
documents, including the correspondence of Robert Long, 
Secretary of State to Charles II. during his exile, the Cork 
and Orrery collection, the Fox-Bunbury collection relating to 
the Napoleonic Wars, and the Holding collection of Nelson 
letters, &c. The several purchases made on these occasions 
are noted below. Among other MSS. of special interest 
purchased privately was the original proclamation, signed by 
the Lords Justices of England, offering 30,000L for the person 
of Prince Charles Edward Stuart, 1st August, 1745. 

By bequest of Charles Aiban Buckler, Esq., who died 
14th June, 1905, at the age of eighty, the Department acquired 
a valuable series of eighty-eight highly finished water-colour 
views of English Cathedrals, Churches, Castles and other 
architectural subjects, by his grandfather John Bickler, his 
father John Chessell Buckler, and himself. They supplement 
the very large collection of architectural drawings by the same 
three talented artists which were purchased from him in 1898- 
1900. The bequest also included twenty -four volumes of 
genealogical and heraldic collections. The only other bequest 
received within the year was from John A. C. Vincent, 
Esq. It consists of extensive genealogical and antiquarian 
collections made by him at the Public Record Ofiice and 
elsewhere, and is now arranged in thirty-three volumes. 

The most important donations were three volumes of 
transcripts from the Portuguese archives made for the purpose 
of the arbitration with Brazil as to the boundaries of British 
Guiana, presented by the Secretary of State for Foreign 
Affairs ; twenty-four volumes of correspondence and papers 
of Charles Babbage, F.R.S., the eminent mathematician and 
inventor of calculating machines, presented by his son, 
Major-Gen. H. P. Babbage ; and the MS. collections and corre- 
spondence of Charles Godfrey Leland relating to the 
Romany language and people, presented by his niece Mrs. 
Joseph Pennell. The last donation also included a number of 
printed books ; the MSS. by the condition of gift are reserved 
from public use for 25 years. 

Among other additions, by purchase, donation, or bequest, 
are the following : — 

Bible, of the Latin vulgate version, with a peculiar order 
of books ; late 13th cent. 

" The Desert of Religion," and numerous other poems and 
prose pieces, in northern English, with roughly drawn 
illustrations ; 15th cent. 

Latin Grammar, with Latin-English vocabularies, a hymn- 
book, &c., apparently the property of a boy at the grammar- 
school of St. Anthony, Threadneedle Street, London ; 15th 
cent. 



S2- ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Treatises on physiognomy and on poisons, in Latin, by 
Petrus de Abano, of Padua ; written in Italy, 15th cent. 
Presented by Francis W. Dymond, Esq. 

Treatise, in Italian, on Italian and Spanish currency and 
the means to restore that of Naples, by Thomas Oliver ; 1508. 

Five general Portolani, 1473-1623, and two detached maps 
of the coasts of Europe, 1520 and 1570 ; executed in Italy by 
Grazioso Benincasa, Georgio Sideri, Vesconte de Maiollo, 
Diego Homem, and others. 

" The Booke of the sea carte, called the Butter," &c. : 
sailing directions between the British Islands and the Con- 
tinent from Ushant to the Elbe, with other nautical matter 
and four coloured maps ; late 16th cent. 

Chronicle of Scotland to 1385, in Latin, by John Fordun ; 
IStli cent. Apparently the archetype of the MS. used by 
Skene as the basis of the printed text. 

Register, in Latin, of proceedings at Rome in the suit of 
Henry VIII. for divorce from Catherine of Aragon, 1529-1533. 
A transcript from the original in the papal archives, 1778. 

Register of certificates in causes before the Star-Chamber ; 
1593-1595. 

Documents connected with projects for the marriage of 
Charles, Prince of Wales, with the Infanta of Spain, and 
subsequently with Henrietta Maria of France ; 1602-1625. 

OfRcial correspondence and papers of Robert Long as 
Secretary of State to Charles II., chiefly letters of Residents 
and other royalist agents abroad; 1649-1654. Included is an 
account of the sale of the jewels of Charles at Amsterdam, 23 
August, 1650. 

Correspondence of Roger Boyle, Earl of Orrery, President 
of Munster, chiefly with the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Lieu- 
tenant of Ireland ; 1660-1674. Three volumes. 

Correspondence and papers of George Stepney, Envoy to 
Berlin in 1698 and to Vienna in 1702-1704 ; 1677-1707. Two 
volumes. 

Correspondence of Charles Boyle, Earl of Orrery, Envoy 
in Flanders, chiefly relating to the Treaty of Utrecht and 
including letters of Lord Bolingbroke, Secretary of State ; 
1711-1714. 

Roll of accompt of T. Spence, paymaster of the Royal 
Bounty to widows of military ofiicers ; 1733-1735. Presented 
by Charles Dalton, Esq. 

Letters of W. Pitt, Earl of Chatham, on the character of 
Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick, the battle of ZorndorflP, &c., 
and of H. Fox, Lord Holland (5), and W. Windham (2) : 1755- 
1791. 

Letter-book of Henry Shirley, Charge d'Aff*aires at Moscow 
and St. Petersburg ; 1767-1768. 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. • 33 

Correspondence and papers of John Stuart, 1st Marquis of 
Bute, during his embassies at Turin, 1779-1782, and at Madrid, 
1795-1796, Six volumes. 

Correspondence of Sir William Hamilton, Envoy to 
Naples, chiefly with Lord Grenville, Secretary of State ; 
1798-1800. 

Papers concerning the French occupation of Malta and the 
battle of the Nile, 1798 ; with three letters of Lord Nelson, 
1798-1805, and a letter to him from General Dumouriez after 
the battle of Copenhagen, 1801. 

Letters of Admirals Lord Nelson, Sir, W. Sidney Smith, 
Sir R. Bickerton, and Sir R. Calder ; 1800-1813. 

Letters to General H. E. Fox from his brother C. J. Fox 
(on the state of Ireland), Gen. Hutchinson, Lord Holland (on 
the death of C, J. Fox), and Lord CoUingwood ; 1802-1807. 

Correspondence of Gen, H. E. Fox, as Commander-in-Chief 
of the English forces in Sicily and Ambassador to the Court 
at Palermo, with other papers relating to military affairs in 
the Mediterranean ; 1805-1814, 

Correspondence of Col. H. E. Bunbury, as Under Secretary 
of State for War, relating to the campaigns in Germany, 
France and Belgium, the restoration of the Bourbons, the 
return of Napoleon from Elba, &c. ; 1813-1816. Two 
volumes. 

Letters on the death of W. Huskisson, M,P., from a 
railway accident, chiefly addressed to his widow; 1880-1831. 
Presented by Col. J. H. Rivett-Carnac, G.I.E. 

Journal-letters of Capt. A. Conolly and Col, C. Stoddart 
during their imprisonment at Bokhara, 2nd Jan. — 22nd May, 
1842 ; with letters of the same and of Dr. Joseph Wolff, 
1834-1846. 

Letters of Sir R. Peel on the repeal of the Corn-laws, 
1846 ; and of R. Cobden on the limits to the offensive power 
of Russia, 1849. 



" The Fall of Angels," a contemporary copy, with varia- 
tions, of Dryden's play, " The State of Innocence," 1674 ; and 
" Try before you Trust," an anonymous comedy, late 17th 
cent. 

Autograph minor poems, «fec., of William Cowper ; 1770- 
1798. 

" When the Lamp is shattered," autograph stanzas by 
P. B. Shelley. 

" The Story of Rimini " and other autograph poems by 
J. H. Leigh Hunt; with letters to him from Thomas Moore, 
1811-1814. 



34 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

" The North and the South," the last poem of E. B. 
Browning, 1861, in the hand of Robert Browning, her 
husband. 

" Svinedrengen," or " The Swineherd," an autograph 
fairy tale by Hans Andersen. 

Miniature of the landing of Hernando Cortes in Mexico in 
1519; painted on vellum by a nearly contemporary Spanish 
artist, and apparently cut out of a MS. 

Notes on painting, by Sir Joshua Reynolds ; an autograph 
draft, apparently for a lecture. 

Correspondence of the family of Cotman and of other 
artists of the Norwich school ; 1817-1864. Five volumes. 

Minute-book of the " Artists' Conversazione " at Norwich ; 
1829-1839. 

Letters of Bernard Barton, the Quaker, relating to pictures 
by J. Crome, J. S. Cotman, and others ; 1843-1847. 

Autobiography of John Wood (1801-1870), artist, illus- 
trated with numerous sketches, copies of his pictures, &c. 
Nine volumes. Presented by Thomas Gray, Esq. 

Correspondence and papers of the family of Herbert of 
Cherbury, including twenty-two poems of Edward, 1st Lord 
Herbert, corrected by himself; 1630-1735. 

Correspondence of the Rev. Philip Morant, chiefly on 
subjects connected with his History of Essex; 1728-1770. 
Seven volumes. 

Letter of Edmund Burke to Sir C. Bunbury, on George 
Crabbe the poet and on the character of C. J. Fox ; 1781. 

Letter of Sir William Jones, the Orientalist, on Halhed's 
Gentoo Laws, the future of the United States, &c. ; 1788. 

Letters to J. F. Newton from George Canning (3), William 
Godwin, Harriet Shelley, and T. Jefferson Hogg; 1788-1838. 

Letters of Isaac D'Israeli, Benjamin Disraeli (2), and 
Count D'Orsay ; 1795-1839. Presented by Walter S. Sichel, 
Esq. 

Letters and papers relating to Mungo Park's last expedi- 
tion to explore the Niger, including a letter from him to Sir 
Joseph Banks, dated Sansanding, 16th Nov. 1805, three days 
before he disappeared ; 1804-1811. 

Two letters of S. T. Coleridge on the evidence for the 
truth of Christianity ; 1816. 

Letters (24) of Thomas De Quincey to the proprietors of 
the London Magazine ; 1821-1824. 

Letter of Sir W^alter Scott to John Cundall, on the game of 
golf and the origin of its name ; 1824. 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 35 

Letter of B. Disraeli to his sister, on his speech on 
Chartism and on the reception of Count Alar cos -, 1839. 

Letter of Charles Dickens, criticising and declining a 
story ] 1870. 

Topographical and antiquarian collections of Sir Henry 
Ellis, K.H. ; 1796-1860. Eight volumes. Presented hv Henry 
J. Ellis, Esq. 

Heraldic collections, with classified indices to grants of 
arms, by Joseph Foster ; late 19th. cent. Four volumes. 

Church notes, monumental inscriptions, &c., in Eno-land 
-and Wales by the Rev. Walter D. Sweeting; circ. 1870- 
1900. 

Chartulary, in Latin, of Snelleshall Priory, in Whaddon, 
CO. Bucks ; 13th. cent. 

Charters (272) relating to Snelleshall Priory, the manors 
■of Whaddon and Winslow, fee, co. Bucks ; 13th-18th centt. 
With court-books of Whaddon manor, &c., 1684-1713. 

Draft answer by Ralph and Laurence Holynshed to a bill 
of complaint by Sir John Savage for a trespass near Maccles- 
field, CO. Chester ; circ. 1485-1490. Presented by Robert 
Steele. Esq. 

Subsidy-roll for Hinkford Hundred, co. Essex, signed by 
the commissioners ; 1664. 

Two rentals of Ramham, co, Kent ; 14th cent, and 1486. 

Five quires of a Chartulary, in Latin, of Pipewell Abbey, 
CO. Northampton (the bulk cf the MS. being already in 
the Museum) ; 13th cent. Presented by the Society of 
Antiquaries. 

Transcripts of parish-registers at Ipswich, co. Suff'olk, 
1539-1812, by the Rev. Edward Cookson. Eio-ht volumes'. 
Presented by the Rev. E. Cookson. 

Charters (19) relating to Easebourne Priory, &c., co. 
Sussex; 1361-1456. Presented by F. Quekett Zouch, Esq, 

History of Protestantism in Dieppe, 1557-1685, by 
Ouillaume and Jean Daval, in French ; with an account by 
Jean Perigal of the dragonnades in Nov. 1685 and his im- 
prisonment and sufferings until he was set on shore, with his 
parents and others, at Dover, 28th April, 1688. Copy by 
Jacques Perigal, 1723. ^^ ^ 

Letters testimonial of John Zapolya, King of Hungary 
with signature and seal ; 1559. Presented by Louis Clarke 
Esq. 

Diary by the Rev. John Moore, Chaplain at Cawnpore, 
during the Indian Mutiny, Oct. 1857-Apri], 1858 ; wich plans 
and painted views, on calico, of Cawnpore, Lucknow, Delhi 
&c. 

124. n 



36 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Index of testators whose wills are preserved in Barbados ; 
1776-1800. 

Autograph account of British Guiana, by William 
Hilhouse, Quartermaster General of Indians ; circ. 1830- 
1835. Presented by the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 

Vocal and instrumental compositions, in score, by the 
Eev. R. Creyghton, D.D. ; 1727. 

"Recueil de Vaudevilles," &c., in score ; 1728. Included 
in a bequest of printed books by H. S. Ashbee, Esq. 

Music in " The Tempest," fee, by H. Purcell, with 
compositions by Tallis, Blow, Pelham Humfrey, and others ;, 
18th cent. 

" Come let us agree," treble part, by H, Purcell ; 18th 
cent. Presented by W. Barclay Squire, Esq. 

Peal-book of the London Society of bell-ringers known a& 
the " Junior Cumberland Youths " ; 1784-182-i. Presented 
by the Society of Cumberland Youths. 

Autograph MS. of Robert Schumann's Sonata in F. minor 
(op. 14) ; 1836. 

" Love's Triumph," autograph opera by W. Vincent 
Wallace, in full score ; 186 2. 

Autograph drafts of compositions, vocal and instrumental;, 
by John Liptrot Hatton ; 1869-1870. 

George F. Warner. 



DEPARTMENT OF OEIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 37 



Department of Oriental Printed Books and 
Manuscripts. 

Cataloguing and Arrangement. — The numbers of the 
sheets of the various Oriental Catalogues sent to press in 
1905 are :— Coptic MSS., 17^ sheets ; Gujarati Accessions, 
13 sheets; Hebrew MSS., 1^ sheets; Sanskrit Accessions, 
17 sheets ; Sindhi MSS., 3 sheets. 

The numbers of the Titles written for the Catalogues 
are : — Amharic,3 ; Arabic, 866 ; Armenian, 141 ; Assamese, 13 
Baluchi, 5 ; Bengali, 219; Bugis, 2 ; Burmese, 58; Canarese 
19 ; Chinese, 265 ; Coptic, 5 ; Ethiopic, 23 ; Georgian, 21 
Gujarati, 104 ; Hebrew, 183 ; Hindi, 276 ; Hindustani, 367 : 
Japanese, 234 ; Javanese, 26 ; Kashmiri, 2 ; Kurdish 7 : 
Kurku, 1 ; Kurukh, 2 ; Korean, 95 ; Malay, 4] ; Malayalam 
180 ; Maltese, 5 ; Mandaitic, 7 ; Marathi, 134 ; Oriya, 24 
Panjabi, 70; Persian, 968; Pushtu, 13; Sanskrit, 648 
Santali, 3 ; Sindhi, 57 ; Syriac, 22 ; Tamil, 319 ; Telugu, 361 ; 
Turki, 4 ; Turkish. 134 ; Zend, 19. 

Sixty-seven Hebrew MSS., 1 Hindustani MS., and 1 
Persian MS. have been fully catalogued. 

Short descriptions of 59 MSS. acquired have been entered 
in the Descriptive List, the Register, and the Classed 
Inventory. 

Thirteen Printed Books (ff. 2,496) and 60 MSS. (fF. 9,88) 
have been folio'd. 

Binding. — The numbers of Printed Books and MSS. sent 
to the Binders are : — Arabic Books, 46 ; Chinese Books, 67 ; 
Hebrew Books, 31; Sanskrit Books, 212; MSS., 130; 
Pamphlets, 51. 

Students. — The number of Students working in the 
Students' Room attached to the Department during the year 
is 3,552. The number of Oriental Printed Books consulted 
in the Department is 6,330, and of those used in the Reading 
Room 407. The number of Oriental MSS. consulted in the 
Students' Room is 7,414. 

Photography. — Thirty-one applications have been made 
to photograph from books and MSS., and 87 negatives have 
been taken. 

Additions. — The number of works added to the Depart- 
ment during the year is 1,481, of which 1,379 are Printed 
Books and 102 are MSS. 

Of the Printed Books, 241 were bought ; 873 were received 
under the India Copyright Act ; 93 were received under the 
Colonial Copyright Act ; and 172 were presented. 

D 2 



38 ACCOUKTS, ETC., OF THE BEITISH MUSEUM. 



The MSS. are :— 










Arabic _ - - 


- 


- 


- 


23 


Arabic and Persian - 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Arabic and Spanish - 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Bengali - - - 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Chinese - - - 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Chinese and Tibetan 


- 


- 


- 


1 


_ Hebrew - 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Hindustani 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Japanese - - - 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Pali - - - - 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Pali and Siamese 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Pali and Sinhalese - 


- 


- 


- 


5 


Persian _ - - 


- 


- 


- 


8 


Sanskrit - - - 




- 


- 


8 


Sanskrit and Sinhalese 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Sinhalese - - - 


- 


- 


- 


21 


Sunda 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Syriac - - - 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Tamil 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Tibetan - 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Turkish - 


_ 


_ 


- 


5 



103 



The most important acquisitions are : — 

Arabic 3ISS. — 1. The Arabic version of three of the 
works of Galen, namely (a) Kitab al-buhran, " De Crisibus," 
(h) Kitab aiyam al-buhran, " De Diebus Decretoribus," and 
(c) Kitab fi asnaf al-hummayat, '' De DifFerentiis Febrium." 
A.H. 580 (a.d. 1184). 8°. None of these treatises has hitherto 
been known to exist in Arabic. 

2. Nazm al-tafsTr, the Mu'allakah poem of Imru' al-Kais, 
accompanied by a commentary by Abu Usamah Junadah 
b. Muhammad al-Azdi al-HarawT (died A.H. 899). Xllth cent. 
4°. No other copy of this commentary is known to exist. 

3. Al-Jami' al-kablr, a treatise on Hanafi law, by Muham- 
mad b. al-Hasan al-Shaibanl (died A.H. 132). Vol. 1. AH. 601 
(A.D. 1204). 4°. Part of a rare work; two detached 

volumes only are recorded, at Cairo and at Constantinople. 

4. Al-ZTj al-mu'tabir al-Sanjarl, astronomical tables by 
Abu Mansur 'Abd al-Rahman al-Khazinl, including also tables 
of conjunctions and eclipses, of dynasties, of latitudes and 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 39 

longitudes, for co-ordination of different eras, for determining 
feasts and fasts, &c., with explanatory chapters. Composed 
about A.H. 532 for Sultan Sanjar b. Malikshah (died A.H. 552). 
A.H. 620 (A.D. 1223). ' 4". The only other MS. at present 
known is the author's autograph in the Vatican. 

5. Sharh al-isharat, a commentary by Fakhr al-Din al- 
RazI (died a.h. 606) upon the Kitab al-isharat wa'1-tanbihat, 
a systematic treatise on speculative philosophy by Ibn STna. 
A.H. 634 (A.D. 1236). 4°. 

6. Kitab ghana wa-mana, a manual of medicine b}' Abu 
Mansur al-Hasan b. Nuh al-Kumri (flourished about A.H. 350, 
A.D. 961). A.H. 678 (A.D. 1279); written by a Persian scribe 
in the island of Uwal, near Bahrain. 8°. 

7. I'tab al-kuttab, biographical notices of state secretaries, 
by Muhammad b. 'Abd Allah al-Kuda'T, called Ibn al-'Abbai' 
(died A.H. 658). Xlll-XIVth cent. "12". 

8. Majma' al-bahrain, a treatise on Hanafi law by Ahmad 
b. 'AIT ibn al-Sa'ati ^^died A.H. 696), with a commentary by 
the author. Vol. 2. Xlll-XIVth cent. 4°. 

9. Al-Mukhtar min madlh al-mukhtar, a collection of 
poems in praise of Muhammad by Yahya b. Yusuf al-Sarsarl 
(died A.H. 656). Xlll-XIVth cent. 4°. 

10. An anonymous commentary upon al-Hawi fi al-fatawi, 
a treatise on law by Najm al-DTn al-Kazwini (died a.h. 665). 
Vol. 2-4. A.H. 745-749 (a.d. 1345-1349). 4°. 

11. Mughni al-labib, a treatise on Arabic syntax by 'Abd 
Allah ibn Yilsuf ibn Hisham (died a.h. 761). A.H. 760 
(a.d. 1359). Transcribed in Damascus, and collated with a 
MS. copied from and collated with the author's original. 4°. 

12. Al-Muhakamat 'ala Sharh al-isharat, glosses and 
criticisms by Kutb al-Din al-RazT (died A.H. 766) upon the 
two commentaries on Ibn Sina's Kitab al-isharat, viz., those 
of Fakhr al-DTn al-RazT and Nasir al-DTn al-TusT. a.h. 761 
(A.D. 1360). 4". 

13. Al-Jami' li-ahkam al-kur'an, an extensive commentary 
on the Koran, by Muhammad b. Ahmad al-Kurtubi (died 
A.H. 671). Vol. 13 (Surah xxxvii. 147-xlvi. 33). " a.h. 762 
(A.D. 1360). 4°. 

14. Sharh al-Sunnah, an extensive collection of Traditions, 
by al-Husain b. Mas'ud al-Farra al-Baghawi (died a.h. 516). 
Vol. 6. XlVth cent. 4°. No copy of this volume has 
hitherto been recorded as extant. 

15. Al-Ta'rikh al-salihi, a compendium of Moslem history, 
by Muhammad b. Salim ibn Wasil al-Hamawi (died A.H. 697). 
Vol. 1, from the Creation to the death of Hasan, a.h. 41. 
XlVth cent. 8°. 



40 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

16. Al-Wafi bi'1-wafayat, a biographical dictionary by 
Salah al-Din al-Safadl (died A.H. 764) ; a detached volume, 
containing part of the lives of persons named Muhammad. 
XlVth cent. 4°. 

17. Risalat fi 'ilm al-firasah, a treatise on the art of 
physiognomy, by Muhammad ibn Abi Talib al-Dimashki 
(died A.H. 727). XVth cent, (lacunae supplied XVIIIth 
cent.) 8°. The only other MS. recorded is in the Khedivial 
Library in Cairo. 

18. A Muhammadan prayer-book, partly in Arabic, partly 
in " Aljamia," i.e., Spanish in the Arabic character. XYIIth 
cent. 12°. 

19. Al-FathTyah fi 'ilm al-musTkl, a treatise on music, by 
Muhammad b. 'Abd al-Hamid al-LadikT, composed under 
Sultan BayazTd ii. (a.h. 886-918, a.d. 1481-1512). A.H. 1161 
(a.d. 1748). 8°. 

Chinese and Tibetan MS. — 1. A volume of mystic dia- 
grams and svmbols of the Northern Buddhist School, painted 
in colours. XVIIIth or XlXth cent. Fol. 

Hebrew MSS. — 1. Sefer Ha-zikkuk, an Index Expurga- 
tovius of Hebrew books compiled by the censor Domenico 
Irosolomitano in 1-596, and later enlarged. XVIIth cent. 8°. 

2. A Hebrew translation of the Koran, from the Latin or 
from the Italian version, printed at Venice in 1547. XVIth 
or XVIIth cent. 4°. 

Hindustani MSS. — 1. Three poems, in the Dakhani 
dialect, on the praises and liiiracles of Muhammad, viz., 
(a) Rabat i jan, by Tufail Mustafa, dated A.H. 1278 (a.d. 1861), 
(6) Man darpan, dated a.h. 1274, and (c) Man jivan, by 
Rauzi, dated a.h. 1274. 8°. Apparently unknown. 

2. Char gulshan, a versified recension, in the Dakhani 
dialect, by Mir Sharshar, of the "Tales of the Four 
Dervishes." Composed A.D. 1772 for Muhammad Najib al- 
Din Khan I'jaz, grandson of Muhammad 'All Khan, the 
last ruling Nawab of Arcot. A.H. 1252 (a.d. 1837). 8°. 
Apparently unknown. 

Pali MSS. — 1. Ekakkhara-kosa, a vocabulary of mono- 
syllabic Pali words, by Saddhammakitti. Palm-leaf, in 
Burmese script. XVIIIth or XlXth cent. 

2. Panchika-pradlpa, a commentary by itahula (XVth 
cent.) upon Moggallana's Pali grammar. Palm-leaf, in 
Sinhalese script. A fine MS., not much later than the 
composition of this important work. 

3. Kanda-kumara-ashtaka, a series of Pali verses on the 
legend and cult of the god Skanda, with Sinhalese trans- 
lation, written in the centre of a square formed of 9 palm- 
leaves, the rest of the space being filled with pictures 
illustrative of the legends in the poem, and with ornamental 
designs, skilfully cut with the stylus, and coloured. XVIIIth 
cent. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 41 

Persian MSS. — 1. Hallaj-namah, a mystical poem by 
i^arld al-DTn 'Attar (died A.H. 627) upon the absorption of 
the soul in the divine essence, a.h. 861 (a.d. 1457). 8°. 

2. Zikr al-sair, a history of Benares from the rise of Raja 
Mansaram tO the accession of Raja MahTpat Narayan, 
a.d. 1737-1781, by Ghulam Husain Khan b. Himmat Khan. 
XVIIIth cent. 8°. 

3. Zubdat al-kawa'if, a history of the Nawabs of Oude to 
A.H. 1287, A.D. 1870, by Jaigopal, called Sakib. a.d. 1870 ; 
autograph. 8°. 

4. Halat i Jang i Malakah wa-Sithanah, a metrical account 
of an insurrection in the districts of Malakah and Sithanah 
in the North-West Provinces after the Great Mutiny. 
XVIIth cent. 8°. 

5. Divan, or poetical works of Mir Kamar al-DTn Minnat 
(died A.H. 1208, A.D. 1794). Containing 12 miniatures, in- 
•cluding portraits of Muhammad, the Nawab A.saf al-Daulah of 
Oude, Warren Hastings, Richard Johnson, the Nawab Nizam 
^AIT Khan of the Dekkhan, &c. XVIIIth cent. 8°. 

6. Khutbahs and correspondence of the Wahhabi religious 
leader Saiyid Ahmad of Bareli. XlXth cent. 4°. 

7. Makhzan i Ahmadi, a religious treatise by Saiyid Ahmad 
of Bareli. XlXth cent. 8°. 

Syriac MSS. — 1. A volume containing (a) prognostics 
for the year, based on the appearance of the moon, &c., (6) 
Pesse da-Shelihe, a work on divination from lots. A.D. 1814. 

12°. 

2. Magic prayers, with illustrations. A.D. 1818. 12°. 

Tibetan MSS. — 1. Prajna-paramita-sanchaya-gatha, reli- 
gious-philosophic verses of the Northern Buddhist school, 
forming part of the Kanjur or scriptural Canon of Tibet. 
XVIIIth cent. (?). Obi. 4°. 

2. Thar-pa chhen-poi phyogs-su rgyas-pa 'gyod-tshangs- 
kyis sdig sbyangs-te sangs-rgyas-su grub-par rnam-par 
bkod-pa mdo, a sutra of the Kanjur. With 6 miniatures. 
Obi. Fol. 

3. A commentary on the Jtrii-chapter of the Katantra, a 
standard Sanskrit grammar. Obi. Fol. 

Turkish MSS. — 1. Annals of the Turkish Empire, 
A.H. 1000-1070, by Na'Traa Efendl (died A.H. 1128). XVIIIth 
cent. 4°. 

2. Annals of the Ottoman Empire, A.H. 1182-1188, by 
Anvarl EfendT (died A.H. 1209). a.h. 1214 (a.d. 1800). 4\ 



42 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITTSH MUSEUM. 

3. Fathnamah, a narrative of the siege and capture of 
the fortress of Szigeth by Sultan Sulaiman, by 'AH Mustafa 
b. Ahmad (died a.h. 1008). a"h. 1018 (a.d. 1G09). 8°. 

4. (a) Ottoman official correspondence with the Safavi 
Shahs of Persia (XVIth-XVIIth centuries) ; (6) Vaka'i 'i Bech^ 
a detailed diary of the siege of Vienna by the Turks under 
Sultan Muhammad IV. in a.d. 1683, probably part of the 
contemporary chronicle of Nishanji 'Abdi Pasha. XVlIIth 
cent. 8^. 

5. Bahr al-ma'arif, lives of Turkish poets, by LatifT (died 
A.H. 990)', composed A.H. 953. a.h. 964 (A.D. 1557). '8°. ^ 

Robert K. Douglas, 



department of prints and drawings. 4-3 

Department of Prints and Drawings. 
1. — Arrangement and Cataloguing. 

The exhibition of drawings in the public gallery has been 
withdrawn and replaced by an historical series of choice 
mezzotints, chiefly from the Cheylesmore collection. A 
guide to this exhibition, which was opened in June, has been 
issued. 

A series of seventy-eight portraits and historical prints 
and drawings has been brought together and contributed 
to the Nelson Centenary Naval Exhibition in the King'& 
Library. 

The mezzotints by anonymous and foreign engravers 
belonging to the Cheylesmore collection have been sorted,- 
identified as far as possible, and arranged in wrappers. 

The work of sorting and arranging in wrappers the 
collection of portraits of English royal personages bequeathed 
by Lord Cheylesmore has been commenced, and completed 
so far as concerns the predecessors of Queen Victoria. 

The prints of ornament by Michael Le Blond have been 
re-arranged, with the addition of heraldic plates from 
the Franks collection, and references to Van der Kellen's 
catalogue added throughout. 

The collection of XVth and XVIth century printed 
books, illustrated with woodcuts, presented by Mr. William 
Mitchell, has been provisionally arranged. 

The collection of etchings by Eembrandt has been defini- 
tively arranged in accordance with the chronological sequence 
recently adopted, and a catalogue and key to it have been 
prepared for departmental use. 

The collection of etchings and aquatints by Paul and 
Thomas Sandby has been re-arranged, the recent bequest 
of Mr. William Sandby being incorporated. 

The collection of etchings and lithographs by J. McNeill 
Whistler has been arranged for mounting, with references to 
the catalogues of Wedmore and Way, 

The Franks collection of shop-bills, &c., has been sorted 
and arranged, all duplicates being eliminated. 

The volumes of drawings in cases 131 and 131*, in the 
Keeper's study, have been re- arranged and numbered. 

One thousand nine hundred and ninety-six prints, one 
hundred and forty-eight drawings, and thirty-one packs of 
playing-cards hove been incorporated with the collections 
to which they severally belong. 

All books of prints and books of reference recently 
acquired have been indexed, labelled and placed. 



44 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A series of duplicate engravings, in seventy-three 
frames, has been lent to the committee of the exhibition at 
Workington. 

A series of duplicate etchings, in fifty-nine frames, has 
been lent to the Corporation of Kingston-on-Thames. 

The Keeper's work on " Early Engraving and Engravers 
in England " has been completed and published. 

The preparation of a descriptive catalogue of the collection 
of Early German and Flemish Woodcuts has been continued. 

The preparation of a descriptive catalogue of the collection 
of English Drawings has been continued and carried down to 
the end of the alphabet, and a portion of it has been sent 
to the printer. 

The work of inserting references to the Cheylesmore 
collection in the index to the collection of English Portraits 
has been continued and completed. 

References to the collection of portraits of foreigners 
resident in England have been written for the index to the 
collection of English Portraits. 

All English portraits recently acquired have been indexed 
and catalogued. 

The preparation of a catalogue of the collection of 
drawings by Rembrandt, for departmental use, has been 
commenced. 

The transcription for press of the catalogues of English 
Portraits and English Drawings has been continued. 

The preparation of an index to the Banks collection of 
shop bills, &c., has been commenced. 

One hundred and seven duplicates belonging to the 
Franks collection of Book plates have been stamped as such 
preparatory to their being returned to the executors. 

Three thousand six hundred and nineteen items have 
^Deen entered in the Register of acquisitions. 

Nine thousand one hundred and six prints, drawings, »Sz;c., 
recently acquired, have been impressed with the departmental 
stamp and references to the Register, and nine hundred and 
seventy have received the special Reeve and Cheylesmore 
stamps. 

The work of preparing, specially repairing, and mounting 
a selection from the Cheylesmore collection of mezzotint 
portraits, additional to that shown in the exhibition gallery 
lias been continued. 

Seven hundred and twenty-three drawings and prints have 
been prepared and mounted on sunk mounts, and three 
hundred and seventy-two others have been mounted in the 
ordinary manner. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 45 

The total number of students admitted to t]ie Print Room 
during the year ending 31st December 1905 was 8,614. 

411 applications were made for leave to photograph 
objects in the collection, and 2,509 photographs were taken. 

JI.^-Additions. 

The total number of prints, drawings, &;c., acquired 
during the year was 3,984, of which the following are the 
most important : — 

Italian School. 
Drawings. 

Aspertini Amico. A sacrificial procession ; pen and 
bistre ; in four portions. 

Canale, Antonio (Canaletto). Westminster Bridge ; pen 
and bistre, with Indian ink wash. Presented hy H. J. 
Ffungst, esq., through the National Art Collections Fund. 

Carracci, Annibale. St. Francis receiving the stigmata ; 
red chalk, pen and bistre. 

Cornacchini, Agostino. Sculptured ornament, 1723 ; pen 
and ink over pencil. Presented by W. B. Squire, esq. F.S.A. 

Francia, Jacopo. A female saint resembling the St. 
Margaret in a picture attributed to this artist in the Prado 
Gallery ; red chalk washed with red. On the back St. 
Apollonia. From the Bernard! collection, Lucca. Presented 
by Max Rosenheitn, esq., F.8.A., through the National Art 
Collections Fund. 

Mazzuoli, Francesco (Parmegiano). Nymph and horse ; 
pen, bistre and wash ; from the Lawrence collection. A man 
standing, seen from the back ; black chalk retouched with pen 
and ink; from the Barnard collection. Four heads; red 
chalk ; from the Thane and Esdaile collections. An album 
containing a collection of fifty-two sketches and studies, 
chiefly from the Lely collection, afterwards in those of 
E. Cheney and Capel-Cure. 

Pinelli, Bartolommeo. A scene in Rome, 1812 ; pen and 
ink and sepia. 

Piranesi, Giovanni Battista. View of the Temple of Isis, 
Pompeii ; pen and brush in sepia. View of a street in Pom- 
peii ; pen and brush in sepia. View of an ancient arch ; 
black chalk. 

Viti, Timoteo. The legend of the Jew who stole and 
fried the consecrated Host ; black chalk. Presented by 
Max Rosenheim, esq., F.S.A., through the National Art 
Collections Fund. 

Zampieri, Domenico (Domenichino). Study of a young 
^man kneeling with his hands on the ground ; red chalk ; from 
the Houlditch, Reynolds and Thane collections. Presented 
by Hon. Mrs. Oldfield. 



46 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Engravings. 

Carracci, Annibale. " La Soucoupe " (Silenus) ; B. 18. 
Presented hy Max Rosenheim, esq., F.S.A. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the ivorks of Masters. 

Botticelli, Alessandro. "Primavera" ; photogravure. 

Melozzo da Forli. Angel playing the mandola; photo- 
gravure. Angel playing the viola ; photogravure. 

Raphael. Nine plates from frescoes in the Vatican ; 
engraved by 0. TJfer, G. Buonafede, A Poretti, G. Marcucci, 
G. Carocci, M. Martini and T. di Lorenzo. Adoration of the 
Magi, by N. Sangiorgi. 

Sarto, Andrea del. St. John the Baptist ; photogravure. 

Titian. Sacred and Profane Love ; photogravure. The 
Assumption ; photogravure. 

Geeman Schools. 

Drawings. 

Schenau, Johann Eleazar. A family group ; watercolours. 
A mother and four children ; watercolours. 



Woodcuts. 

Anonymous. A judge. St. James the Greater. Military 
subject, c. 1600, with arms of Bavaria and Lorraine. Pre- 
sented by Max Rosenheim, esq., F.S.A. 

Beham, Hans Sebald. Christ's entry into Jerusalem 
(Pauli, 707). Presented hy Max Rosenheim, esq., F.S.A. 

Flbtner, Peter (attributed to). Triumphal arch erected 
for the visit of Charles V. to Nuremburg in 1541 ; v^^ith Latin 
and German text, printed by C. Egenolph, Frankfort a. M. 
Presented by Max Rosenheim, esq., F.S.A. Woman and 
jester, (Pass 27). 

Ilamer, Steffan. Puzzle cut containing a portrait of 
Ferdinand I. Presented hy Robert Renshaw, esq. 

Springinklee, Hans. St. James, St. John, St. Peter, 
and St. Paul, four of a set of the Apostles ; late impressions, 
from " Das Newe Testament," 1524. Presented hy Max 
Rosenheim, esq., F.S.A. 

Stimmer, Tobias. Title border with the four Evangelists, 

four Doctors of the Church, and the device of Froben of 

Basel; undescribed. Presented hy Max Rosenheim, esq., 
F.S.A. 

"Worms, Anton von. Page border, with device of 
Eucharius Cervicornus. Presented by Max Rosenheim^ 
esq.,FS.A. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 47 

Engravings. 

Jenichen, Balthasav. Four plates of the History of 
Hercules and seven plates of the Months ; all after Beham. 
Presented by Max Rosenheim, esq., F.S.A. 

Soils, Virgilius. Lucretia (b. 64) ; Jahel (b. 66) ; and 
Hester (b. 67). Presented by Max Rosenheim, esq., F.S.A. 

Schools of the Netherlands. 

Di^awings. 

Anonymous, early XVIth cent. The Tale of Troy ; 
design for tapestry ; pen and ink. 

Cuyp, Aelbert. Dutch landscape ; charcoal, pencil and 
Indian ink ; signed. A specially fine example. 

Moucheron, Isaak de. Landscape ; pen and watercolours. 

Poelemburg, Cornelius van. Sketch of bathing nymphs 
in a landscape ; Indian Ink. 

Rembrandt. Sketch of a composition of God renewing 
the covenant with Abraham; red chalk; from the Cosway 
collection. 

Eembrandt (School of). Biblical subject ; pen and sepia. 
Woodcut. 

Leyden, Lucas van. The Crucifixion ; on vellum ; from a 
missal. 

Engravings. 

De Bry, Theodor. Joseph and Potiphar's Wife. Eight 
plates from armorial shields. Presented by Max Rosen- 
heim, esq., F.S.A. 

French School. 
Drawings. 

Gavarni. A man in a red shirt raising his hands above his 
head ; watercolour on brown paper. 

Rodin, Auguste. A woman and child, pen and ink and 
watercolour wash, heightened with white, A man and woman 
standing together ; pen and ink. Presented by Claude 
Phillips, esq., through the National Art Collections Fund. 

Troyon, Constant. Cattle moving along a road ; pencil, 
charcoal and pastel. 

Etchings. 

Lalanne, Maxime. Thirty-eight examples. Presented by 
R. Gutekunst, esq. 



^8 ACCOUNTS, ETC.j OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM, 

Lithographs. 

Redon, Odillon. Nine examples. Presented by Archibald 
Russell, esq. 

Engravings. 

Grateloup, Jean Baptiste. Portrait of Bossuet ; after 
Rigaud ; undescribed state. Portrait of Fenelon ; second 
state. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of blasters. 

Clouet, Portrait of Charles IX. ; photogravure. 

Collin, Raphael. La Poesie ; etching by Gabrielle 
Poynot from a picture in the Hotel de Ville, Paris. Pre- 
sented by the Prefect of the Seine. 

Greuze, Jean Baptiste. La Priere ; by T. L. Atkinson, 
mezzotint. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Harpignies, Henri. Le Jardin du Luxembourg ; etching 
by H. Toussaint from a picture in the Hotel de Ville, Paris. 
presented by the Prefect of the Seine. 

Picard, Georges. La Lutte and Le Re veil ; etchings 
by E. Buland from jjictures in the Hotel de Ville, Paris. 
Presented by the Prefect of the Seine. 

Vigee-Lebrun, Marie. Portrait of herself; photogravure. 
Lady Hamilton as the Persian Sybil ; by D. H. Pratt; pre- 
sented by the Engraver. 



Russian School. 

Etchings. 

EgorofF, Evdokine. A collection of sixty-eight proofs of 
etchings and drypoints of Russian subjects. 



Artists of Foreign Schools working in England. 
Drawings. 

Mercier, Philippe, Music and dancing in a park ; Indian 
ink. 

Ramberg, Johann Heinrich. A lad}^ walking ; water- 
colours. 

Etchings. 

Ramberg, Johann Heinrich. A Dominican monk watching 
a country dance ; tinted. An Abbot watching a country 
dance; coloured. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 49 



Engraving. 

Bartolozzi, Francesco, R.A. Portrait of Mrs. Udney 
after E.. Cosway ; stipple ; first state. 



English School. 
Drawings. 

Aide, Hamilton, VieAV of the Propyleea from the 
Parthenon, Athens ; watercolours, 1899. Presented by the. 
Artist. 

Burton, Sir Frederic William, R.H.A. Life-sized study 
of a head strongly resembling Mary Ann Evans ("George 
Eliot ") ; watercolours. 

Butler, Samuel. Three sketchbooks and three drawings 
in watercolours and pencil. Presented by H. Festing 
Jones, esq. 

Cook, Edward William, R.A. Holby shore, near Fever- 
sham ; pencil. Cart shed, Hanworth, near Norwich ; pencil. 
Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Cotman, John Sell. Fire at the vinegar works on the 
Wensum at Norwich ; pencil and body colour. Presented by 
H. J. Pfungst, esq, through the National Art Collections 
Fund. 

Cruickshank, Isaac Robert. Portrait of himself ; highly 
finished in Indian ink. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Dance-Holland, Sir Nathaniel, R.A. Study of head of 
Lord Camden, for the engraved portrait. 

Glover, John, Sketchbook with Indian ink views of the 
scenery of the English Lake district, done in 1821 ; purchased 
by Mr. Cooper from the executors of the artist in Tasmania 
a few months after his death in 1850. Presented by 
D. Elphinstone Cooper, esq. 

Lane, William. Portrait of Alicia Otway, afterwards 
Mrs. Bale ; crayons. 

Lawrence, Sir Thomas, P.R.A. A woman's head ; pencil, 
black chalk and Indian ink. Bust of a girl ; pencil, black 
chalk and Indian ink. 

Lover, Samuel. Portrait of W. M. Thackeray ; pencil 
and watercolours ; said to have been retouched by Maclise ; 
from the collections of Maclise and Lord J. Butler. 

Pinwell, George John. Evening ; haymakers returning 
from the fields ; watercolours. Head of a girl ; pencil. 
Figures seated on a bank ; pencil and charcoal sketch. 

Reynolds, Samuel William. Portrait of Mrs. Lloyd after 
Sir Joshua Reynolds ; watercolours. 



50 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Smith, John Raphael. Portrait of a youii;^ lady in a mob- 
cap ; pencil touched with watercolours. A lady seated ; 
black chalk heightened with white ; from the Warwick 
collection, 

Stevens, Alfred. Thirty-eight studies, chiefly from 
groups in early Italian frescoes ; pencil and watercolours. 

Etchings. 

Bone, Muirhead. Somerset House ; drypoint ; trial proof. 
Portrait of Mrs. Gutbier; drj'-point ; fourth state. Presented 
by the Artist. Bookplate of Lincoln College, Oxford ; dry- 
point ; two impressions. Presented by the Rector of Lincoln 
College. 

Br^^den, Robert. Collection of one hundred and twenty- 
one plates. Presented by the Artist. 

Robinson, Sir John Charles. Twenty-one plates ; views 
in Dorsetshire, Spain, and Portugal. Presented by the 
Artist. 

Whistler James McNeill. Fitzroy Square ; impression 
from a plate drawn on by Whistler but injured before etching 
and laid aside ; the damage was repaired and the plate etched 
and printed by Frank Short after Whistler's death. Pre- 
sented by T. R. Way, esq. 

Lithogra2)hs. 

Shannon, Charles Hazelwood. The Sower and the Reaper. 
The Wayfarers. The Bathers. Presented by the Artist. 

Whistler, James McNeill. The Doctor. Portrait ojf 
Dr. Whistler, No. 2. Presented by Mrs. W. McNeill 
Whistler. One hundred and seventeen examples, a valuable 
and almost unique series ; presented by Thomas Way, esq. 

Woodcuts. 

Shannon, Charles Hazelwood. Twelve subjects ; executed 
in chiaroscuro. Presented by the Artist. 

Engravings. 

Bryden, Robert. Portrait of himself ; original mezzotint. 
The Entombment ; original mezzotint. Presented by the 
Artist. 

Green, Valentine. The Satyr and the Traveller, after 
Jordaens ; mezzotint. Presented by J. S. Earle, esq. 

Smith, John Raphael. The Sword, Rennes : mezzotint. 

Ward, William. Portrait of Monsieur de St. George ; after 
M. Brown ; mezzotint ; printed in colour and touched by 
hand. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 51 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 

Caldecott, Randolph. The Gardener's Little Daughter ; 
etching by E. Gaujcan. 

Constable, John, R.A. The Vale of Dedham, by J. B. 
Pratt ; mezzotint. Stormy Noon, Hampstead Heath, by 
Norman Hirst ; mezzotint. The Hay Wain, bj? J. B. Pratt ; 
mezzotint. Salisbury Cathedral, by Norman Hirst ; mezzo- 
tint. Presented hy E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Crofts, Ernest, P. A. King Edward VIT. distributing 
South African War Medals ; photogravure. 

Goodwin, Albert. Arundle Church, Sussex, by H. Mac- 
beth Raeburn ; etching. Presented hy E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Gow, Andrew C, R.A. A Musical Story by Chopin, 
by P. Le Rat ; etching. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Hook, James Clarke, R.A. Catching a Mermaid ; photo- 
gravure. Presented hy E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Johnston, Andrew. The Land o' the Leal, by J. Dobie ; 
etching. Presented hy E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Leighton, Frederick, Lord, P.R.A. Nerissa; photo- 
gravure. Presented hy E. E. I^eggatt, esq. 

Mason, George, A. R.A. When the shadows of evening 
fall, by L. Daultrey ; etching. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, 
esq. 

Moore, Albert. Reading Aloud ; photogravure. 

Reynolds, Sir Joshua, P.R.A. Euphrosyne ; three-colour 
process. Presented hy E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Romney, George. Lady Hamilton as Joan of Arc, by 
Norman Hirst ; mezzotint. Lady Hamilton in Prayer, by 
Norman Hirst ; mezzotint. Lady Hamilton; by E. Stamp; 
mezzotint. Presented hy E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Rossetti, Dante Gabriel. Joli Coeur ; photogravure. 

Whistler, James McNeill. The Artist's Mother; photo- 
gravure. 

Oriental. 

Peacock with tail displayed ; a woodcut in colour, from a 
painting by the Chinese artist Kujaku-Myowo : executed by 
six engravers under the direction of S. Tajima in the course 
of five months for an exhibition held at Osaka in 1903. 
Ten impressions only were produced by 318 printings from 
100 blocks. 

A ferry-boat ; Indian ink drawing by the Japanese artist 
Hokusai. 

Ten Buddist painted rolls from Thibet. 
124. E 



52 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Portraits. 
Foreign. 

Hedouin, Edmond ; etching by E. Boilvin, from a picture 
by A. Leleux at Versailles. Presented by M. Brajeux. 

Louise, Queen of Prussia ; after G. Richter ; photogravure. 

English. 

Elizabeth, Queen ; the rare contemporary engraving by 
J. Rutlinger. 

Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia, on horseback, Heidelberg 
in the background ; anonymous. 

Jackson, William, of Exeter, after J. Downman ; mezzo- 
tint. 

Jebb. Sir Richard Claverhouse, D.C.L., M.P , after Sir 
G. Reid ; photogravure. Presented by Professor G. H. 
Darwin, F.R.S. 

Linley, Eliza and Mary, after Gainsborough ; by E. 
Gulland ; mezzotint. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Peareth, William Jennens, after Hoppner ; by S. W. 
Reynolds ; mezzotint. 

St. Albans, Francis Bacon, Viscount ; proof of the en- 
graving by Jeens published in Spedding's edition of Bacon's 
Works, 1868. Presented by Hon. Mrs. Oldfield. 

Turner, Joseph Mallord Willliam, R.A. ; after J. Gilbert. 

Ward, Mrs. Townley after Romney ; by H. S. Bridge- 
water; mezzotint. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Warwick, Henrietta, Countess of, after Romney ; by 
H. S. Bridgewater ; mezzotint. Presented by E. E. Leggatt 
esq. 



Sets and Collections. 

Five hundred and forty-eight photographs of portrait 
drawings by Clouet and other sixteenth century artists in 
the Bibliotheque Nationale, the Louvre, and the Musee Conde, 
Chantilly. 

One hundred and thirty-two photogravures from pictures 
in the Imperial Gallery at Vienna. 

Five hundred and thirteen proofs of woodcuts after Sir 
John Gilbert, J. D. Watson, Sir John Tenniel, and J. G. 
Pinwell, executed for yarious pubUpatipjls by the brothers 
Dalziel. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 53 

Fifty-nine original lithographs by G. Clausen, A.R.A., 
H. Moore, R.A., G. F. Watts, R.A., R.W. ; Macbeth, R.A., and 
other modern English artists, most of which were included 
in Messrs. Dunthorne's exhibition in 1895. Presented by 
Frederick Goulding, esq. 

Twenty-three plates from A. F. Ammann's " Geschichte 
der Familie von Zurich," 1904. Presented hy Herr A. F. 
Ammann. 

Three hundred and ninety-five platinotype photographs of 
ancient or interesting buildings and monuments in various 
parts of the United Kingdom ; in continuation of the National 
Survey and Record. Presented hy the Secretary on behalf of 
the Contributors to the Survey and Record. 



Books of Prints. 

Baudelaire, Charles. Les Fleurs du Mai, 1891 ; with nine 
photogravures from drawings by Odillon Redon. Presented 
by Archibald Russell, esq. 

Bock, T. de. Jacob Maris ; with ninety photogravures, 
1904 

Brunfels, Otho. Biblich Bettbbiichlein ; Strassburg, 
1531 ; with title-page and twelve borders by Hans Weiditz. 

Cust, Lionel, M.V.O. The Bridgewater Gallery ; one 
hundred and twenty photogravures from paintings at Bridge- 
water House ; with descriptive and historical text ; 1903. 

Eybe, Albrecht von. Spiegel der Sitten ; Augsburg, 1511 ; 
with woodcut portrait of the author by Hans Schaufelein. 

Hutten, Ulrich von. Super interfectione propinqui sui 
Joannis Hutteni Equ. Deploratio ; Mainz, 1519 ; with a 
woodcut by Kans Weiditz. 

Josz, Virgile. Antoine Watteau, 1905. 

Manet, Edouard. Trente Eaux-fortes Originales, with 
a portrait of Manet ; Paris, 1905. Presented by W. B. 
Paterson, esq. 

Nolhac, Pierre de. J. M. Nettier, Peintre de la Cour de 
Louis XV., 1905. 

Robaut, A. L'CEuvre de Corot, vols. i. and ii. ; 1905. 

Tissot, Jacques Joseph. La Sainte Bible (ancient Testa- 
ment) ; 1904. 

Ward, Humphrey, and W. Roberts. George Romney ; a 
biographical and critical Essay, with a catalogue Raisonne 
of his Works, 2 vols. 1904. 

Williamson, J. C. History of Portrait Miniatures, 2 vols. 
1904. 

E 2 



54 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Zoller, Haug. Spyegel der Blinden, Augsburg, 1522 ; 
with frontispiece by H. Burgkmair. 

Canon Sacratissime Misse, Landshut, 1520; with wood- 
cut title-border, dated 1519. 

Das aunder teyl des alten Testaments, Strassburg, 1524 ; 
with twenty-three woodcuts hy Hans Weiditz. 

Das alte Testament deutsch, Basel, 1523 ; with four 
woodcuts by Hans Holbein, many others by inferior artists, 
and title-page by Urse Graf. 

Zeichnungen Albrecht Diirers in der Albertina zu Wien, 
1905. 

Pictures by Sir Joshua Reynolds at Althorpe House ; 
eleven reproductions in colours, with preface by Sir Walter 
Armstrong ; in a portfolio. 

The Birth and Triumph of Cupid ; twenty-four plates 
engraved by P. W. Tomkins from papers cut by Lady 
Dashwood, 1795. 

Five proofs on vellum of woodcuts published by the Kelm- 
scott press. Presented hy Mrs. Procter. 

Die Kunsthistorische Ausstellung zu Diisseldorf, 1904 ; 
with ninety plates. 

A Selection from the Collection of Drawings by the Old 
Masters, formed by C. Fairfax Murray ; privately printed, 
1904. 

Books of Reference. 

Berenson, B. The Drawings of Florentine Painters, 
2 vols., fol. 1903. 

Leslie. C. R. Memoirs of the Life of John Constable, 
2nd ed. 1845. 

Rooses, Max. Rubens, sa Vie et ses (Euvres. 

Sidney Colvin. 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 55 



Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities. 

I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, 8fC. 

Egyptian Antiquities : — 

The general re-arrangement of the Egyptian Collection 
has been continued, and the greater number of the important 
objects acquired during the year have been incorporated and 
exhibited. 

The remainder of the sepulchral stelae of the Xllth 
dynasty, which were formerly exhibited in the Egyptian 
Vestibule, have been built into bays in the Northern Egyptian 
Gallery, and labelled. 

The collections in two standard-cases in the Third and 
Fourth Egyptian Rooms have been re-labelled and re- 
arranged. 

The re-arrangement of the Egyptian Galleries has been 
continued, and the casing, repairing, labelling, and re-labelling 
of the stelae have been practically completed. Stone plinths 
have been built into several bays for stelae and other objects, 
and a number of slate shelves have been fitted. 

The south wall from the chapel of the pyramid of one of 
the great Queens of the Island of Meroe, which was presented 
by the Sudan Government in 1905, has been rebuilt on a 
stone plinth, in a bay on the west side of the Southern 
Egyptian Gallery. 

Ten granite plinths and pedestals have been made, and 
statues have been fitted and mounted into them ; one hundred 
and forty-five alabaster plinths have been worked and 
polished, and bronze figures of gods and sacred animals have 
been mounted upon them ; fourteen oak pedestals and sixty 
satin-wood pedestals have been made, and figures and other 
objects have been mounted upon them. 

Seven hundred and eighty-five scarabs have been mounted 
on cloth-covered plinths, and numbers have been attached 
to them. Two hundred and sixty-eight ostraka have been 
boxed. 

Five large statues have been repaired ; sixty-six ushabtiu 
figures have been cleaned and repaired ; one coffin has been 
repaired and put together; seventeen stelae have been re- 
paired, and fifty-five stelae have been provided with new 
frames. 

The wall paintings from the tombs of Thebes, which were 
formerly exhibited in the Egyptian Gallery, have been mounted 
in two new standard cases in the Third Egyptian Room. An 
additional shelf has been inserted in the wall-cases of the 
Third Egyptian Room, and the gods and sacred animals have 
been grouped upon it. 



56 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Eleven hundred and thirteen descriptive labels have 
been written and painted ; four thousand and seventy 
numbers have been painted on objects. 

One hundred and forty objects have been registered. The 
transcribing of hieratic papyri has been continued, and eight 
sheets have been printed^off. Descriptions of forty-six plates 
of Coptic ostraka and stelae have been written, and read in 
proof. 

Three thousand six hundred and thirty-six index slips, 
and five hundred and ninety-seven identification slips, have 
been written. A list of objects presented has been made. 

Assyrian Antiquities : — 

The general re-arrangement of the Babylonian and 
Assyrian collections (the unexhibited section) has been con- 
tinued. Two thousand six hundred and twenty-five tablets 
have been re-numbered, and the necessary alterations have 
been made in the registers and case-books. The 1905 collec- 
tions have been numbered and arranged ; one thousand five 
hundred and fifty-four tablets have been boxed ; five thousand 
seven hundred and seventy-three tablets have been num- 
bered. 

Twenty-four descriptive labels have been written and 
painted ; one limestone slab has been repaired and mounted ; 
twenty-three case-tablets have been opened ; seven hundred 
and ninety-three tablets have been repaired and cleaned ; 
one hundred and thirty-one fragments have been rejoined. 

About three thousand tablets have been registered. 
Copies of forty-six inscribed cones, bricks, fee, have been 
written. 

Fifty plates of text have been copied for publication. 

The preparation of a complete edition of the great 
trilingual inscription of Darius at Behistun is in progress ; 
and ten sheets have been printed off". 

The entries in the case-books have been kept up to date. 



Publications. — Part XXI. of " Cuneiform Texts from 
Babylonian Tablets, &c., in the British Museum" has been 
compiled and issued. " Greek and Coptic Texts of the 
Christian Period in the British Museum," dealing with the 
Christian inscriptions of Ancient Egypt, with one hundred 
plates, has been printed and issued. 

Students. — About 2,750 visits have been made to the 
Department by students and others ; and 2,987 objects have 
been issued for their use. 

Sixty-five parties, comprising about eight hundred and 
seventy persons, have been personally conducted through the 
Department by members of the staff". The parties came from 



BQYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 57 

institutions, educational and social clubs, schools, &;c., at 
South Kensington, Islington, Hornsey, Kensal Green, Plum- 
stead, Paddington, Chelsea, Bow, Woolwich, Teddington, 
Wandsworth, Walthamstow, Westbourne Park, Bays water, 
Stoke Newington, &ic. Parties from the Polytechnic, Regent 
Street, the Church Army Training Home, and the University 
Extension Association, also visited the Department. 



II. — A cquisitions. 
Egyptian : — 

i. A collection of miscellaneous antiquities from Beni- 
Hasan : — 

1. A massive, painted wooden coffin, made for 

one Sebek-hetep, who probably flourished 
about B.C. 2600. 

On the inside are inscribed several ex- 
tracts from a very ancient Recension of the 
Book of the Dead, and above these are 
pictures of funeral offerings. 

2. An inner coffin, made for the same Sebek- 

hetep. 

3. A wooden head-rest, or pillow. 

4. A basket and a piece of rope. 

5. Wooden bowl. 

0. Model of a large rowing boat, with figures of 
the crew, which consisted of ten men. 

7. Model of a sailing boat, with a canopy, on 

which is painted the cognizance of the 
owner, whose figure is placed beneath. 

8. Model of a granary, with divisions for holding 

samples of different kinds of grain, and 
figures of the men in charge. 

9. Models of figures engaged in performing sacri- 

ficial ceremonies, and preparing offerings for 
sacrifice. 

10. Bow, with seven arrows, some of which are 

tipped with flint. 

11. A pair of sandals. 

12. Two terra-cotta figures, 

13. Eight red-ware vases and one stand. 

14. A large shell. 

15. Mummy of a child in a cartonnage case. 

16. A gilded cartonnage mask. 

All the above objects were found at 
Beni-Hasan in Upper Egypt, and belong 
to the period of the XEIth dynasty, about 
B.C. 2400. 



58 ACeoUNtS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

ii. 1. Bronze pendant from a menat, or object which 

was carried by priestesses into the temples, 
and used by them in the performance of 
certain ceremonies connected with the 
worship of Osiris. This example is orna- 
mented with an jBgis of Hathor, a naos 
containing two figures, &c. XXth dynasty. 

2. Wooden stele inscribed for Ptah ari-tas, the 

son of Sa-Bastet-ari-tas. XXth dynasty. 

3. Black basalt statue of Uah-ab-Ra-mer-Net, a 

priest of Neith, holding before him a shrine 
containing a figure of the goddess ; the 
statue was made at the expense of the son 
of the deceased, who wished to " make his 
father's name to fiourish." XXVIth dynasty. 

4. Fine, large, limestone sepulchral ste]e of an 

official called Paai. Late XXVIth dynasty. 

iii. 1. Five large steatite scarabs, belonging to the 

period which lies between B.C. 3300 and 
B.C. 2400. 
2. Bronze statuesque figure of a man, wearing a 
heavy wig. From Kurna. Vlth dynasty. 
r 3. Chisel, in fine bronze. Early period. 

4. Axe-head, in fine bronze. Early period, 

5. Two bronze objects which were probably used 

in the construction of a temple. 

6. Blue porcelain cylinder, inscribed with the 

name of Thothmes IV., B.C. 1500. 

7. Blue porcelain plaque, for inlaying in the 

cover of a toilet box. XVIIIth dynasty. 

8. Three calcareous stone slabs inscribed in 

hieratic, with drafts of extracts from 
literary compositions. XVIIIth or XlXth 
dynasty. 

9. Bronze heel of a stafl' or sceptre. 

10. Bronze case for the mummy of an ichneumen. 

11. A set of four ushabtiu boxes, which were 

made for a priestess of Amen called Hent- 
meht, about B.C. 1000. Each box contains 
ten figures, painted in bright colours, and 
inscribed. These boxes were placed in the 
tomb of the deceased, one in the middle of 
each wall. This is the only complete set 
of such boxes in the Museum. 

12. A unique set of four inscribed bricks, of crude 

mud, on which are mounted figures and 
amulets, intended to protect the deceased 
in the tomb from the enemies who might 
threaten him (or her) from the north, south, 
east, or west. The manner in which these 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 59 

bricks were used is described in the Papyrus 
of Nu, in the British Museum, Chapter 
OXXXVII. Each brick is inscribed with a 
magical text in heiratic. About B.C. 1000. 

13. Painted hawk-headed coffin, containing the 

mummy of a hawk. Late Period. 

14. Similar coffin, inscribed. 

15. Basalt figure of the priest Mekau. B.C. 650. 

16. Basalt figure of a priest of Amen. B.C. 660. 

17. Basalt figure of a priest holding a figure of 

Osiris. Late Period. 

18. Five ushahtiu figures of Tchanahabu, and one 

of a priestess of Amen. B.C. 550. 

19. Wooden wool-dresser, with iron teeth. 

20. An important collection of seventeen stelae, 

inscribed in Greek or Coptic, from Esna 
in Upper Egypt. They illustrate Coptic 
funerary art between A.D. 500 and 900. 

IV. 1. An alabaster sub-plinth of a statue inscribed 

with the prenomen and nomen of Rameses 
II. ; the statue belonging to this plinth was 
purchased in 1903. 

2. Bronze figure of Harpocrates wearing the 

crown and plumes of Amen ; the disk is 
inlaid with silver, and the feather work 
with red composition. The ej'es, urseus, 
and nails of the fingers and toes are inlaid 
with gold. On the plinth is an inscription 
stating that this figure was dedicated to 
Queen Ankhnesnef erab - Ra, daughter of 
Psammetichus XL, and wife of Amasis II., 
by Pef-aa-Bast, an official in the temple of 
Amen-Ra, about B.C. 600. The fine basalt 
sarcophagus of this Queen was acquired by 
the Trustees of the British Museum early 
in the last century. 

3. Bronze censer, in the form of a lotus column. 

On the handle is a figure of the king, or 
priest, who dedicated the object to the 
temple. A fine specimen. About B.C. 660. 
4 Bronze figure of the goddess Sekhet, on a 
plinth ; behind her is the model of a sepul- 
chral coff'er, also in bronze. A very rare 
object. About B.C. 600. 

5. Bronze ring inscribed with the name of Amen- 

hetep IV., who reigned about B.C. 1450. 

6. Bronze figure of a Babylonian, or Assyrian, 

rtlague-god, found in Egypt. 



# AGCOUJ^TS, IITC, OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

7. Two seated figures, in fine limestone, of Kha- 

em-Uast, a high priestly official of Menthu- 
Ra, and his wife, a priestess of Anit. Fine 
work. About B.C. 1550. 

8. Red granite head of the goddess Neith, of 

Sais. About B.C. 500. 

9. Fine white stone scarab, with the figure of 

a king slaving his foes cut on the base. 
B.C. 500. 

10. A Greek inscription of the Coptic Period, 

from Upper Egypt. About A.D. 500. 

11. Four Coptic sepulchral stelse of the Vlth to 

Vlllth centuries. 

V. A. collection of two hundred and twenty-six scarabs 
and plaques in steatite, porcelain, amethyst, car- 
nelian, schist, &c., which includes examples of all 
periods from the Vlth dynasty, about B.C. 3500 to 
about B.C. 650, when scarabs ceased to be made in 
Egypt. About sixty-six are inscribed with royal 
names, and those bearing private names are of 
verj'^ fine workmanship. 

vi. Three small sepulchral stelse inscribed with prayers 
for funeral offerings. The oldest, which is of 
wood, belongs to the XXIInd dynasty, about 
B.C. 1000, 

Assyrian : — 

i. A collection of about six hundred and thirteen tablets 
and fragments of tablets, belonging chiefly to the 
period of the First Dynasty of Babylon, about 
B.C. 2400. In it are included several " case- 
tablets," bearing interesting seal impressions ; a 
large number of contracts written in the Semitic 
dialect of Babylonia, which was current when 
they were drawn up ; two tablets, written in the 
Sumerian language, and containing copies of re- 
ligious compositions ; a few letters of the reign of 
Khammurabi (b.c. 2150) ; several lists of revenues 
of various kinds, which were employed in drawing 
up the large summaries ; and tablets belonging to 
the cadastral survey of Lower Babylonia. 

ii. A collection of sixty-six Babylonian tablets, chiefly 
contracts, the greater number of which belong to 
the Persian Period, about B.C. 550. 

iii. A collection of hard limestone bowls and other 
vessels, from an ancient site in Assyria. 



EGYPTIAN And ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 6l 

A collection of thirty seal cylinders in agate, 
chalcedony, basalt, and haematite, of various 
periods between B.C. 2000 and the Persian Period, 
about B.C. 400. Among them may be specially 
mentioned : — 

1. Early Babylonian seal, of green schist, 

engraved with a mythological scene, re- 
presenting the Sun-god slaying an enemy 
with a mace, and another god, or hero, 
slaying a foe. (No. 102,044.) 

2. Babylonian seal of black marble, with scene 

representing a hero in conflict with two 
lions and two ibexes. (No. 101,963.) 

3. Black marble cylinder of Sin-imguranni, the 

son of Sin-ishmeani. (No. 101,965.) 

4. Haematite cylinder of Ibni-Martu, the son of 

Shumi-Ishtar. (No. 102,047.) 

5. Two haematite cylinder-seals engraved with 

scenes connected with the worship of 
Shamash, the Sun-god, and his wife Aa. 
(Nos. 102,045 and 102,046.) 

6. Chalcedony seal, inscribed with a spirited 

design, in which two gods, or heroes, are 
seen in conflict with winged horses having 
dragons' tails. (No. 101,966.) 

7. Three lapis-lazuli cylinder-seals inscribed 

with scenes connected with the worship 
of Sin. (Nos. 102,058, 102,065, and 
102,067.) 

8. Haematite cylinder seal of Idin-Ishtar, the 

son of Sabala, the servant of Ninshuanna. 
(No. 102,061.) 

9. Haematite cylinder-seal dedicated to Adad. 

(No. 102,068.) 

10. Haematite cylinder-seal dedicated to Shamash 

and Aa. (No. 103,059.) 

11. Chalcedony cylinder-seal of the Persian 

Period. Scene : Marduk in conflict with 
Tiamat. (No. 102,056.) 

12. Chalcedony cylinder-seal of the Persian 

Period. Scene : Centaur slaying a winged 
monster with bow and arrow. (No. 
102,064.) 

13. Chalcedony cylinder of the Persian Period. 

Scene : A winged god in conflict with a 
bull. (No. 102,069.) 

14. Chalcedony cylinder of the Persian Period. 

Scene : A representation of the ceremony 
of fertilizing the palm-tree. (No. 102,062.) 



62 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

15 Chalcedony cylinder of the Persian Period. 
Scene ; A god (Auramazda ?) standing 
beneath the winged disk from which shoot 
forth two thunderbolts, which the god 
grasps, one in each hand. On each side 
of him are winged and eagle-headed 
attendants bearing offerings. Very fine 
workmanship. B.C. 450. (No. 102,060.) 

III. — Presents. 

i. The south wall of the chapel of the largest and most 
important pyramid of the Northern Group of the 
Pyramids of the Island of Mero'e, in the Sudan. 
This pyramid was built for one of the great Queens 
of Meroe, who bore the title of " Candace," pro- 
bably during the first or second century of the 
Christian Era, and its chapel and fore-courts and 
pro-pylons were sculptured with elaborate reliefs, 
representing the queen's funeral procession, the 
offerings made in the tomb, &c. The queen's 
name is nowhere found on the walls in hiero- 
glyphics, and the cartouches, which are sculptured 
in high relief, and in a very prominent place, have 
not been filled up. At one end of the wall the 
queen is seen seated by her consort, whose name 
also is unknown. She wears a fringed garment, 
with ropes and tassels, and on her arms are elabor- 
ately ornamented armlets. The reliefs on the 
other portion of the wall represent a table of 
offerings, the Hall of Osiris, the Judgment Scene, 
rows of divine and other figures making offerings 
and pouring out libations before the queen, who 
is also seen leading four bulls for sacrifice. The 
reliefs on the wall are typical of the best class of 
funereal sculpture in the island of Meroe, of which, 
before the arrival of this object, there was no 
example in the National Collection. 

Presented hy the Government of the Sudan, 1905. 

ii. A. A valuable collection of miscellaneous antiquities 
from Der - al - Bahari, among which may be 
mentioned : — 

1. Three black granite portrait statues of 

Usertsen III. Xllth dynasty. 

2. Sandstone tablet of Pa-ser. 

3. Colossal statue of Amen-hetep I. as Osiris. 

XVIIIth dynasty. 

4. Tablet with reliefs of Amen-hetep I. and 

Menthu-hetep I. XVIIIth dynasty. 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 63 

5, Fine alabaster head of a cow. From an 
image of the cow-goddess Hathor. XVIIIth 
dynasty. 

0. Part of a limestone figure of a girl. XVIIIth 
dynasty. 

7. Tables, with relief of Queen Hatshepset. 

XVIIIth dynasty. 

8. Granite stele of Het-aai. XXth dynasty. 

9. Inscription containing a prayer for the 

priestesses of Hathor. 

10. Model of a flight of altar steps. XVIIIth 

dynasty. 

11. Ostrakon and graffito. XVIIIth dynasty. 

12. Cone of Sen-Mut, the architect. XVIIIth 

dynasty. 

13. Wooden mummy ticket for Ameni. Xlth 

dynasty. 

14. Model coffin, with a wax figure of the de- 

ceased. Xltb dynasty. 

15. Bead collar. Xlth dynasty. 

16. Horn bangle. Xlth dynasty. 

17. Lotus-flower capital. Xlth dynasty. 

18. Part of an alabaster vase stand. Xlth 

dynasty. 

19. Mummy of Kauit. Xlth dynasty. 

20. Mummy cloth of a priestess. Xlth dynasty. 

21. Figure of a slave carrying a basket. Xlth 

dynasty. 

22. 23. Pair of leather sandals. Xlth dynasty. 
24-26. Two wooden mallets and a hoe. 

27. Flint chisel. 

28-43. Sixteen hieratic ostraka. 
44. Demotic ostrakon. 
45-50. Six Coptic ostraka. 

51. Fragments of vases, wine-jars, bowl, tile, «Sz;c. 

52. Blue glazed cow's head, three apes, and a 

figure of Hapi. 

53. A group of plaques, scarabs, eyes, &ic., 

inscribed with the name of Thothmes III., 
&c. 

54. A collection of red and blue beads. 

55. Unglazed scarab. 

56. Blue-glazed ball. 

57. Votive plaque. 



64 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

ii. B. 1. Plaque of Amen-hetep I. B.C. 1500. 

2. Broken ring of Amen-hetep III. B.C. 1450. 

3. Blue glazed head of Hathor. 

4. Peg with human head. 

5. Blue glazed rosette. 

6. Blue glazed amulet. 

7. Cartouche plaque. 

8. Fragment of papyrus. 

9. Bronze spatula. 

10. 11. Two iron knives. 

12. Iron forceps. 

13. Ivory comb. 

14. Fragments of a blue and white cup. 

Nos. 9-14 are from Oxyrhynchus. 

iii. A collection of miscelloneous antiquities from 
Sarabit al-Khademand W^di Maghara,in the Penin- 
sula of Sinai : — 

1. Copper chisel. 

2. Fragments of eleven bangles in blue faience. 

3. Fragments of eight vase - stands in blue 
: faience. 

4. Fragments of two boomerangs inscribed with 

the names of Seti I. 

5. Handle of a sistrum. 

6. Fragments of four Hathor plaques. 

7. Blue glazed plaque, with cat. 

8. Seventeen fragments of the menat amulet. 

9. Eight fragments of blue faience vases. 

■ 10. Sixteen fragments of blue glazed ware. 

11. Seven pieces of vases,with coloured decoration 

in relief. 

12. Fragments of turquoise matrix. 

13. Thirteen stone mining tools. 

14. Fragment of an iron stamp. 

15. Figure of Sen-usert. 

16. Small stone obelisk. 

17. Block inscribed with the name Sa-nekht. 

18. Figure of Seneferu. 

19. Stone sphinx. 

20. Insciibed stele, and a group of stone objects, 

with a photograph of the same. 

21. Part of a hawk in stone. 

22. Portion of a statue of Barneses III. 
Presented by the Egypt Exploration Fund. 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 65 

iv. 1. A collection of twenty-one ostraka inscribed 

chiefly in Greek. 

2. Wooden fastening of a box inscribed with the 

name of Seti I. Mer-en-Ptah. B.C. 1310. 

3. Wooden fastening of a box inscribed with the 

name of Amen-hetep III. B.C. 1450. 

4. Wooden fastening of a box. 

5. Scarab inscribed with the prenomen of a king 

of the Vlth dynasty. 

6. Three scarabs from the Sudan. 
Presented by Sir John Evans, K.C.B., F.R.S. 

V. 1, A bronze plate from the door of a temple at 

Thebes, inscribed with the name of Amen- 
hetep III. B.C. 1450. 
2. A collection of sixty-three vases, bowls, pots, 
&c., in earthenware, of various periods, from 
Kom Al-Akhmar and Hissaya. 
Presented by F. G. Hilton Price, Esq., F.S.A. 

vi. A handsome rectangular limestone slab from the 
door of the tomb of Pari, a priest of Ptah, and 
overseer of the estates of the god Amen-Ra, of 
Thebes. The deceased flourished in the reign 
of Amen-hetep III., about B.C. 1450, and an in- 
teresting throne name of this king is inscribed 
on the slab. 

Presented by Robert Mond, Esq. 

vii. Portion of a flint handle of a sistrum, or weapon (?), 
inscribed, " Pacifier of the two lands," i.e., a title 
of one of the kings of Egypt. 

Presented by H. W. SetonKarr,Esq. 

viii. 1. Two glass bottles, ornamented with human 
faces in relief. Grseco-Roman Period. From 
Syria. 

2. A large round glass bottle, with a long neck. 

From Syria. 

3. A flat glass bottle. 

4. Fluted glass vase. 

5-7. Three small glass bottles. 

8. Glass pendant. 

9, 10. Two glass weights. 

11. Gold sepulchral amulet, inscribed. 
12-19. Eight terra-cotta plaques. From Palmyra. 
Presented by Mrs. H. H. Way. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

ix. Portions of a large and important bronze figure of 
an official of the XXIInd dynasty, about B.C. 1000. 

Presented by James Danford Baldry, Esq. 

X. A collection of flints from Sinjar, and from the 
neighbourhood Der Az-Zur, and other places in 
the Mesopotamian Desert. 

Presented by R. G. Thompson, Esq., M.A. 

xi. A collection of early flint implements from the 
surface of the desert near Thebes, in Upper 
Egypt. 

Presented by H. R. Hall, Esq., M.A. 

xii. Steatite scarab inscribed with the prenomen of 
Kameses II., enclosed within annules. Found at 
Haifa. 

Steatite scarab inscribed with the figures of a beetle 
and ur?ei. Found at Bagrawiya in the Siidan. 

Presented by E. A. Wallis Budge, Litt.D. 

siii. 1. Green glazed porcelain ring with the pre- 

nomen of Rameses II. on the bezel; 

2. Green glazed porcelain ring, with crowned 
urseus on the bezel. 

8. Blue glazed porcelain ring, with an utchat on 
the bezel. 

Presented by the Hon. L. Walter Rothschild, M.P. 

E. A. Wallis Budge* 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 67 



Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities. 



I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, c&c. 

The two columns, which stood at the entrance of the so- 
called Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae, have been restored 
from the original portions presented to the Museum, with 
the aid of plaster casts of fragments of the shafts and capitals 
existing in other collections. Two marble bases have been 
prepared for the columns, and alterations, have been made 
in the arrangement of the Archaic Room to allow of their 
suitable exhibition. A relief has been fixed to the wall of 
the Third Graeco-Roman Room, and a stele placed in the 
Phigaleian Room. Several plaster fragments have been 
joined to the Metopes and Frieze of the Parthenon. 

In the Etruscan Saloon, Cases 26-37, 54-63, 88-98, and 
126-135 have been cleared of their contents and cut back. 



Four statues, 2 heads, 4 reliefs, 1 statuette, 2 inscriptions, 
and 5 miscellaneous pieces of sculpture have been mounted 
on marble or stone; 119 bronzes, 8 gems, 8 silver rings, and 
6 terra-cottas mounted on wooden blocks ; 9 frescoes and 
2 mosaics framed ; and 8 frames containing frescoes fixed on 
the walls of the passa,ge leading to the Gold Ornament Room. 
Four blocks have been made for gems, and three pedestals for 
the Fourth Vase Room. 

73 vases, 73 terra-cottas, 89 bronzes, 7 lamps, and 40 
miscellaneous objects have been cleaned and repaired. 

449 labels have been written, 636 objects numbered, and 
280 objects registered. 

The Catalogue of Roman Pottery and the Catalogue of 
Rings have been made ready for the press. Progress has 
been made with the Catalogue of Vases (Vol. I.), and with 
revised editions of the Catalogue of Gems, the Guide to the 
Sculptures of the Parthenon, and the General Guide to the 
Department. 

The number of visits to the Students' Room for purposes 
of research has been 574 : 1,000 other visits to the Staff for 
purposes of enquiry, and 2,985 attendances of students in the 
Sculpture Galleries have been entered. 

Numerous parties of students of architecture and oLher 
subjects have visited the Department for lectures and 
'demonstrations. 

124. T 



68 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

II. — A cquisitions. 
By Purchase. 

I. — Objects in Gold. 

1. Bandeau, with a small loop at each end and a clasp 
at the centre in the form of a figure-of-eight knot, which 
encloses a palmette. The ornamented parts at the centre and 
each end are encrusted with minute granulated work. 

2. A series of tiny ornaments in stamped gold foil, pierced 
for attachment. The ornaments are of three types : (1) Victory 
alighting on the ground ; (2) Nude Bacchante with her head 
thrown back and a slain kid in her right hand ; (3) Dancing- 
girl. 

3. Necklace, consisting of a string of circular studded 
beads and a lunate pendant, set with a garnet and a plasma. 

4. Two pairs of earrings in the form of a small figure of 
Eros, who wears across his breast a vine-branch with grapes. 
Above is a garnet set in a disc. One pair has below a pendant 
in the form of a Panathenaic amphora. 

3, 4 are from a tomb near Damascus in Syria. 

5. Diadem, stamped with patterns in relief. In the centre 
are the capital and base of an Ionic column, of which the 
shaft was probably formed by an inlaid stone, now lost. On 
either side is seated a wmged Victory, and beyond her is a 
series of groups composed of a winged and horned lion on 
either side of a winged female figure, whose legs terminate 
in spirals of which she holds the ends. A similar type of 
composite figure may be seen in the Museum on the capital 
of a column from Salamis in Cyprus; see Catalogue of 
Sculpture, II., No. 1510, pi. XXVII. 

6. Ring, with engraved design of a woman seated on the 
«terri of a ship, by the side of which a dolphin is plunging; 
this group is almost identical with the type of certain coins 
of Histisea (see Gat. Photia6.es, pi. iii., No. 484). 

II. — Silver. 

1. Bangle of six coils which terminate in the heads of 
snakes. The central coil is inscribed KAHTIOZ, KXr/r<oc. 
From Vounitza in Acarnania. 

III. — Bronze, 

1. Archaic statuette of half -crouching Seilenos. From 
Civita Castellana. See Tyszkiewicz Sale Catalogue, 1898, 
pi. XI., No. 124 ; Burlington Fine Arts Gluh, 1904, p. 45, 
No. 34, pi. LI. 

2. Statuette of a Seilenos, dancing with arms extended. 
First part of the 5th century B.C. 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 69 

3. Statuette of Harpokrates, holding his right forefinger 
to his mouth and having an asp coiled round his left arm. 
From Egypt. Work of the Ptolemaic period. Burlington 
Fine Arts Clwh, 1904, p. 36, No. 2, pi. XLII. 

4. Statuette of a fisherman, seated on a rock with a basket 
on his left arm. From Egypt. Burlington Fine Arts Club, 
1904, p. 44, No. 31, pi. LI. 

5. Mirror-handle, with figure of Eros seated between two 
tree-trunks. Perhaps from Campania. Burlington Fine 
Arts Club, 1904, p. 53, No. 62, pi. LVII. 

6. Attachment of a girdle decorated with incised palmettes. 
Burlington Fine Arts Club, 1904, p. 60, No. 94, pi. LXV. 

7. Handle of vase terminating in busts of Asklepios and 
Hygieia. From Egypt. Burlington Fine Arts Club, 1904, 
p. 63, No. 103, pi. LXVIII. 

8. Statuette of a Satyr, on an Ionic capital ; has formed 
part of a lamp of which the handle terminates in a panther's 
head. Formerly in the collection of Prince Ibrahim. 
Burlington Fine Arts Club, 1904, p. 48, No. 42, pi. LI. 

9. Archaic statuette of the so-called " Apollo " type. It 
is of minute size and careful workmanship. From Trapezia 
in Arcadia. 

10. Archaic statuette of a warrior, wearing cuirass, greaves, 
and a helmet with tall spikes. The figure, which is clumsy 
and ill-proportioned, is an example of an early art, native to 
Sardinia. See Perrot et Chipiez, Histoire de V Art, vol. IV., 
pp. 64 f. 

11. Statuette of the Gaulish Jupiter, wearing long-sleeved 
tunic, trousers, and brogues. Gallo-Roman art. 

12. Left leg of a statuette, broken at the knee. Good 
Greek work of the 4th century B.C. 

13. Archaic figure of a horse in very rude style. 

14. Similar figure, fastened to a plate, of which the under 
side is engraved with a design, which could be used as a 
stamp. It represents two men resting their hands on spears ; 
their bodies are joined. From near Phigaleia in Arcadia. 

15. Statuette of a bearded god standing on two lions. 
He wears a high headdress, decorated with animals in relief. 
Perhaps Herakles Sandan. From Elis. 

16. Pair of hands with the fingers spread ; the palms are 
joined by a hinge and the wrists socketed to receive wooden 
handles. 

17. Lamp with two nozzles. The filling-hole has a cover 
decorated with a rosette. From Tripolitza in Arcadia. 

18. Model of a throne with a high back. The legs are 
decorated with rosettes, volutes, and palmettee. 

F 2 



70 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

19. Bucket (situla) with a ribbed handle: inscribed in 
Etruscan AN \ O^ M, Suthina. 

20. Bust of Artemis, intended for attachment to some 
object ; her eyes are inlaid with silver. 

21. Ticket of an Athenian juryman, inscribed E <l>IAOXAP 
e ^iXoxaplngJ Axa[pv^i>g^- AX A .... 

22. Three fibulae ; one Hungarian (?) of about 200 A.D., 
the others Gaulish of the first century a.d. 

23. Two weights of Olbia on the Black Sea, inscribed 

OABIO 
OABIO and 0EYKAE . Mavrogordato Collection. 
OYZKAE 
ANAPO 

IV. — Engraved Gems. 

1. Sard intaglio with fine design of a nude statue of 
Apollo, who stands on a pedestal with a lyre in his left hand 
and a plectrum in his right. 

2. Banded sard scaraboid, with intaglio design : a woman 
dressed in a long tunic, holding flowers. 

3. Plasma scaraboid, with intaglio design : head of a 
bearded man in a Phrygian cap. The engraving was not 
finished. 

4. Four haematite gems of the Mycenaean period. From a 
tomb at Sphiktia near Mycenae. 

5. Plasma scaraboid, with intaglio design : Omphale with 
lion's skin and club of Herakles. 

6. Glass scaraboid of pale green colour with intaglio 
design : Asiatic Artemis with a lion on either side. 

7. Lentoid carnelian, with intaglio design : bull licking his 
hind foot. 

8. Carnelian scaraboid, with design in relief of a crouching 
lion. The form of this gem is rare. 

9. Rock crystal scaraboid, with intaglio design of a 
standing wild goat. 

10. Carnelian in modern gold setting, with intaglio design : 
Odysseus, bound to the mast of his ship, passing the Sirens, 
who are on a cliff" above him. 

11. Sard intaglio, set in a modern gold ring, with design : 
head of young Dionysos within a wreath. 

Y.— Marble, cfcc. 

1. Head of a youth from an anthropoid sarcophagus. 
From Alexandria. Capel Cure Collection. 

2. Head of a youth in high relief; from a sepulchral 
monument. Fine Attic work of the 4th century B.C. 



GREEK AND BOMAN ANTIQUITIES. 71 

3. Fragment of a stele with a design of three sepulchral 
vases, supported by acanthus plants and lion-gryphons 
rampant. This scheme of decoration is not known on any 
other work of the class. 4th century B.C. 

4. Relief representing a warrior in helmet and cuirass, 
leaning on his spear, round which coils a snake ; in front is a 
pilaster, crowned by a vase. The design was probably com- 
pleted by a woman facing the warrior. See Catcdogue of 
Sculpture I., No. 750. 2nd century B.C. From Rhodes. 

5. A series of small figures of cats, some in limestone, 
some in marble. 

6. A limestone base, which once supported a figure of a 
cat; it is inscribed TAAATEIA : 0EYAOTOY, '''Galateia, 

BOYBAZTI 
daughter of Theudotos, to Bubastis." 

5, 6 are said to have been found at Bubastis, in Egypt. 
They date from the 2nd -1st century B.C. 

7. Plaster cast of a fragment from the capital of one of 
the Mycenae columns (see below). 

VI. — Terra-cotta. 

1. Head of a goddess, wearing high headdress, diadem, 
and necklaces. 4th century B.C. From Locris. 

2. Statuette of a seated woman, nursing a child on her 
left arm. Inscribed at the back AEONTEWC, Aeovrtwe. 
From Boeotia (?). 

3. Statuette of Aphrodite, standing and wringing her hair 
with both hands. There are traces of colour on her drapery. 
From Thebes. 

4. Statuette of a woman, draped in tunic and mantle. 
From Tanagra. 

5. Whorl, inscribed EYXAPHZ, Evxaprig. 

Yll.— Pottery. 

1. White lekythos of large size, with painted design : a 
stele, on either side of which a youth and a maiden bring 
offerings. On the steps a youth is seated. 

2. Plate, decorated with a circular border, painted pink, 
white, and black ; within the border a woman moves to the 
right, holding two wreaths. Her hair and wreaths are painted 
yellow. The design is much injured. Boeotian fabric. 

3. Four plain vases of ordinary Mycenaean w^are. From 
Sphiktia, near Mycenae. 

4. Askos, in the form of a lobster's claw with red-figured 
design of a fox devouring a cock and a dog running. See 
Burlington Fine Arts Club, 1904, p. 117, No. 68, pL XCVII. 



72 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

5. Fragment of a white lekythos with design of a nurse 
holding a child before a seated woman. Burlington Fine 
Arts Gluh, 1904, p. 106, No. 36, pi. XCIV. 

6. Fragment of a white lekythos with design of head and 
shoulders of a bearded man. Burlington Fine Arts Club, 
1904, p. 106, No. 37, pi. XCIV. 

5, 6 are fine examples of the delicate drawing of the best 
Attic lekythoi. 

7. Lekythos, with pyxis-shaped body, decorated with a 
design in black figures, representing a sacrifice to Athena. 

8. Lekythos, with red-figured design of Demeter stand- 
ing before the winged car of Triptolemos. Inscribed 
AHMHTHPs AniiiVTvp, and AIOTIMOZ KAAOZ, Aionfiog 
KaXog, a name not previously known in this connection. 

9. Two-handled bowl, decorated with two friezes of 
animals in black on a red ground. 

10. Bowl and jar with lid; the first decorated within and 
without with girls holding flowers, sphinxes, &c., painted in 
red and black on a light ground ; the second decorated with 
a frieze of sphinxes, rosettes, and lotos-flowers, painted in 
the same manner. Grseco-Phoenician ware. From Achna in 
Cyprus. 

11. Wine-jug (oinochoe) of great size with geometric and 
figured designs in friezes. Among the motives are browsing 
horses, link pattern, zigzags, vertical lines, &c. " Proto- 
Attic " ware of the 7th century B.C. From Athens. 

12. White lekythos, with design of a stele ; on one side of 
it is a girl carrying a basket, on which is a hare ; on the 
other a youth stands with one foot on a step of the stele, 
resting his head on his right hand. From Eretria. 

13. Lekythos, with design of a woman seated in a chair 
and weaving with a small hand-loom, which rests on her 
knee ; by her side is a wool-basket. Painted in white and 
red pigment on a black glaze. 

14. White lekythos, with design of a stele, on one side of 
which is a youth, seated, wearing short tunic and high laced 
boots, while on the other a woman in a long black tunic 
makes an off'ering. The colours are well preserved. 

15. Fragment of a cup, decorated with a design of 
Herakles striking with his club, painted in black on a white 
ground. The fragment belongs to a cup from Naucratis in 
the Museum (See Catalogue of Vases, III., D 1), and was 
obtained from the Antiquarium at Munich in exchange for 
pottery from Enkomi in Cyprus. 

16. A series of vases, most of early fabrics, which were 
formerly in the Morel Collection (See British Museum 
Return, 1902, p. 75 f., and 1905, p. 68) and have now been 
transferred by the Department of British and Mediaeval 
Antiquities to this Department, 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 73 

"VIII. — Ivories. 

1. Plaque, with a design in low relief of a lion devouring 
an ibex. 

2. Plaque, made up of two fragments, with a design in 
low relief. On the upper part is a bearded Seilenos, reclining 
and drinking out of a horn. On the lower part is a 
crouching lion ; on his back are the ends of two flutes and in 
front a long tail, perhaps of a Seilenos. 

These two plaques are rare example's of the Ionian art of 
ivory-carving at the beginning of the 5th century B.C. 
Similar plaques are in the Louvre and at Florence. 

3. Three ornaments carved in the form of boys, shown in 
various attitudes. 

By Donation. 

I. Three fragments of columns in green limestone, deco- 
rated with zigzag bands and spirals. These fragments form 
the greater part of the two columns, which stood on either 
side of the entrance to the " Treasury of Atreus " at Mycense. 

Presented by the Most Hon. the Marquess of Sligo. 

II. Three plaster casts of fragments of a column and of 
the capitals oE the two Mycenaean columns. 

Presented by the Greek Government, through 

M. Cavvadias, Ephor-General of Antiquities. 

III. Plaster cast of a fragment of one of the capitals of 
the Mycenaean columns. 

Presentedj by the Karlsruhe Museum. 

IV. A series of archaic terra-cotta statuettes, excavated 
in 1894 at Kamelarga in Cyprus. See Journal of Hellenic 
Studies, XVII., pp. 164 f. 

Presented by J. L. Myres, Esq. 

V. A series ot objects found in the rubbish mounds at 
Behnesa (Oxyrhyncus), with papyri of the 1st to the 5th 
centuries A.D. 

Presented by the Egypt Exploration Fund. 

VI. Gold finger-ring: within the hollow bezel a gold plate 
has been inserted, bearing a design in relief representing the 
temple of Aphrodite at Paphos. Formerly in the Tyszkiewicz 
Collection ; See Sale Catalogue, 1898, No. 195. 

Presented by a Friend of the Museum. 

VII. Bronze boat-shaped fibula, decorated with incised 
chevrons and concentric circles. From Orvieto. 

Presented by Mrs. W. Kemp-Welch, 



74' ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BEITISH .MUSEUM. 

VIII. Bronze razor (?) with handle ending in a swan's head 
£^nd blade engraved with fish and palmettes. From Carthage. 

Presented by Miss Mabel Moore. 

IX. Two bronze handles of wine-jugs, one in the form of 
an ape, the other of a panther. Alexandrian art. 

Presented by Henry Wallis, Esq. 

X. Bronze horse-muzzle. 

Presented by C. H. Read, Esq. 

XI. A series of terra-cotta statuettes. Acquired at Locri. 

Presented by Lady Ottoline Morrell, and the 
Hon. Hilda Douglas- Pennant. 

XII. — 1. Fragment of black glazed fluted ware, decorated 
with a figure of Eros leaning against a column. From 
Palermo. 

2. Stone fragment of the rim of a large jar (jyithos) with 
design of a stag hunt in relief. From Girgenti. 

3. Steatite lenticular gem with engraved design of a 
gazelle struck in the neck by a spear. From Knossos, Crete. 

Presented by Mrs, Eustace Smith. 

XJII. Terra-cotta disc, with a hole on the under side. 
Found on a primitive site at Gournia, Crete. 

Presented by Miss Harriet Boyd. 

XIV. — 1. Two plaster jar sealings, one inscribed . . . 
CILI OCTAVIANI, the other ^^,^^'g 

2. Limestone stamp, inscribed ykoy ^^^^'^'^^v. 

3. Tert^a-cotta lamp, decorated with three grotesque 
masks. On the base is inscribed KA. 

Presented by M. Georges Manolakos. 

XV. Two fragments of Grseco-Eoman pottery, one 
decorated with a design of Pan dancing, the other with a 
design of two gladiators. From Knidos. 

Presented by F. W. Hasluck, Esq. 

XVI. — 1. Silver half-ring with intaglio design of a 
Victory. A gold pin has been driven into the ring in 
antiquity. 

2. Three bronze half-rings with intaglio designs : (a) a 
boy's head rising out of a conch shell ; (6) a crane ; (c) a 
water-bird (?). 

Presented by M. Jean Gabrilakis. 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. . . 75 

XVII. Two pairs of silver earrings and four silver rings. 
From Thebes. 

Presented by M. J. Kondylis, 

XVIII. Plaster cast of a steatite vase, decorated with a 
design in relief which represents a procession, perhaps of 
harvesters. The original was excavated at Haghia Triada in 
Crete, and is of . pre-Mycensean date ; see Monumenti 
Antichi, XIII., pp. 77 f., pis. T.-III. 

Presented by Cecil Smith, Esq. 

XIX. Plaster cast of a head from the East Frieze of the 
Parthenon. See Miohaelis, Der Parthenon, pi. 14, no. 57. 

Presented by the Royal Museuin at Berlin. 

XX. Plaster cast of an inscription in Greek, forbidding 
Gentiles to go within the inner court of the Temple at 
Jerusalem. See Acts of the Apostles, c. 21, v. 28. The 
original is in the Imperial Museum at Constantinople. 

Presented by the Rev. W. Bramley-Moore. 

XXI. Lead weight; on the upper side is- the figure of a 
winged Victory, with a star and a wheel in the field. Weight) 
20 grammes. 

Presented by B. V. Head, Esq. 

Cecil Smith. 



^6 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of British and Mediaeval Antiquities and 
Ethnography. 

I. — A rrangement. 

Prehistoric Section. — A new table-case has been supplied 
to contain the model of Arbor Low, and various additions 
made to the Stone Age Gallery. 

Late-Keltic and Gaulish Sections. — The remaining wall- 
cases containing the British Antiquities have been re-painted 
and a type-series from the Glastonbury marsh-village 
exhibited in a table-case. Further progress has been made 
with the labelling and arrangement of the Morel Collection, 
and a Merovingian series from the Charente exhibited in the 
same table-case as the corresponding series from the Morel 
Collection. Frames with an electrotype series of ancient 
British coins and map of distribution, as well as a map of 
ancient Gaul have been added. 

Romano-British Section. — The collection of brooches 
has been roughly classified, and those of Late-Keltic types 
exhibited apart, to illustrate their development. A slip- 
catalogue of the ornamented pottery has been commenced. 

Mediceval Roovi. — A frame containing specimens of 
leather-work has been afiixed to the wall, and a shelf re-fitted 
for the exhibition of eilamelled heraldic pendants. The 
collections of pilgrims' signs, chamberlains* keys, watches, 
pendants, armour, leather, spoons, with some enamels, and 
ivories, have been permanently labelled. Several sections 
have been re-arranged, and a selection of pilgrims' signs 
exhibited. 

Glass and Ceramic Room. — The permanent labelling of 
the English pottery and porcelain has been completed in 
accordance with the Catalogues ; and the casts from moulds 
found at Lowestoft exhibited with Lowestoft ware in a new 
standard case in the ante-room. 

Asiatic Saloon. — The porcelain in the three large standard 
cases has been cleaned and repaired. 

Gallery of Religions. — The floors have been polished 
throughout and the table-cases shifted for the purpose. 
Two table-cases have been filled with Buddhist specimens 
from Siam, Burma, and India ; Buddhist stone-carvings 
re-arranged in Cases 44, 45 ; and Cases 46-55, as well as 
part of Table-case C, filled with two collections from Tibet. 
Wall-cases 59-76 have been repainted, and standard cases 
A and B re-fitted for Buddhist relics, which have been 
permanently labelled. 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 77 

Ethnographical Gallery. — In the Asiatic section a 
collection from Tibet has been placed in Case 161 and 
labelled, while the Andaman and Nicobar Collections have been 
re-arranged and labelled. In the Oceanic section another 
series of feather cloaks from the collection of the Prince 
and Princess of Wales has been exhibited ; the New Zealand 
table-cases re-arranged, and the Tikis exhibited in a frame 
on the central screen. In the African section, the Masai 
section has been re-arranged, and a collection from the Upper 
Nile exhibited in Case 102. The contents of a Ju-ju house 
from S. Nigeria and fetishes from South-West French Congo 
have been placed in Standard-case Q. The collections from 
the Gold and Slave Coasts in Cases 63-66 have been 
re-arranged, and a series of masks exhibited and labelled. 
In the American section, -Cases 87-89 have been re-arranged, 
and collections added with labels. 

A'liierican Room. — The remaining five wall-cases have 
been re-fitted and the room completed with general labels. 
The cases have been numbered, and stone carvings from 
Central America placed above the wall-cases. 

Gold Ornament Room.— The Oxus Treasure has been 
re-arranged and labelled in accordance with the published 
Catalogue. The South American series has been re-arranged, 
and permanent labels provided for the cameos. The re- 
mounting and labelling of the finger-rings has been begun. 

Registration. — The registration of current acquisitions 
has been continued, and 3,136 objects have been added, 
while 165 ethnographical specimens have been drawn and 
described. 

Catalogues. — The Catalogues of the Oxus Treasure and 
of English porcelain were both published in March, and the 
Guide to Antiquities of the Early Iron Age in October. 
Progress has been made with the Guide to the Ethnographical 
collections. 

Additions have been made to the slip-catalogue of medi- 
aeval pilgrims' signs, and a slip catalogue of the Ivory and 
Maiolica collections begun. A number of Ceramic and 
Prehistoric pamphlets have been arranged for binding. 

Photographs to the number of 69 have been taken in the 
Department for purposes of illustration and reference ; 577 
type-written labels cut and bordered ; 59 mounting-boards 
papered, and 999 specimens mounted. Specimens from Torres 
Straits, Samoa, and New Zealand, as well as Japanese 
armour and North American Indian dresses, have been 
cleaned. Two table-cases have been lined, and a slope 
velveted. Forty impressions of wood-blocks have been 
taken, 12 wooden stands stained and varnished, and 162 
blocks for finger^rings covered with velvet. 



78 ACCOUNTS, ETC.; OF THE BEITISH MUSEUM. 

Kegistration numbers have been painted on 4,417 speci- 
mens, and 1,778 permanent labels written. Wooden labels, 
plinths, and pedestals to the number of 1,564 have been 
prepared. 

An Ogham stone has been repaired and mounted, and an 
Indian sculpture mounted : several pieces of Central American 
sculpture and two figures in the Colonnade have been washed. 
Ninety-seven packing-cases of specimens collected on the 
Cooke-Daniells expedition to New Guinea have been dealt 
with, and 17 cases of specimens despatched to various 
museums. 

One thousand nine hundred and five students and visitors 
have been received in the Department ; and two parties from 
the John Lyon School at Harrow conducted through the 
Prehistoric section by a member of the Staff. 



II. — Acquisitions. 

(1.) Prehistoric and Early British Antiquities ;— 

A porphyry palaeolithic implement and two of flint from 
Hertingfordbury, Herts ; several palaeolithic flints from 
Knowle Farm Quarry, Savernake Forest, and some of 
exceptionally small size from the same site and from 
Welwyn, Herts; found and given by Rev. H. G. 0. Kendall. 

Ochreous flint of " eolithic " form and small dimensions 
from the North Downs, near Ightham ; and part of an 
implement from the palaeolithic area north of Ash Church, 
near Wrotham, Kent ; given by B. Harrison, Esq. 

A large flint pounder from the Thames at Hammersmith ; 
a polished flint celt found near Mitcham, Surrey; flint 
arrow-heads and flakes from Northdale, near Bridlington, 
E.R. Yorks ; and a barbed arrow-head from Blackaton Farm, 
Bodmin Moors ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., F.S.A. 

Part of a broad flat knife of flint dredged from the 
Thames at Cookham, Berks ; given by R. E. Goolden, Esq., 

F.S.A. 

A pierced stone axe-hammer of exceptional workmanship, 
dredged from the millstream at Cookham, Berks, 1896 ; 
given by Stephen Darby, Esq. 

Pottery vase with a band of bosses, perhaps of neolithic 
date ; found in the Thames. 

A model of Stonehenge, Wilts. 

A bronze halbert-blade and dagger with rivets found at 
Wrexham, Denbigh, 1838, the former illustrated in Archceo- 
logical Journal, XI. 414 ; a similar halbert-blade of the 
Bronze Age from Maryport, Cumberland, with three rivets 
in position. 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 79 

A socketed spear-head of bronze dredged from the Thames 
at Cookham Dean, Berks ; given by R. E. Goolden, Esq., 

F.S.A. 

An ornamented bronze bowl and an embossed fragment 
of bronze, both of the Late-Keltic period, and found in 
London (Mayhew Collection) ; also an embossed bronze 
mount of Early British work, from Tooley Street, City of 
London. 

Four Late-Keltic cinerary urns, one of pedestal type, from 
Rochester, Kent ; given through the National Art Collections 
Fund. 

Bronze fastener and harp-shaped brooch found at Lincoln, 
and an iron socketed spear-head from the River Lea; given 
by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

A type-series from the British marsh-village at Glaston- 
bury, Somerset, including pottery, loom-weight, and weaving- 
combs ; given by the Glastonbury Antiquarian Society. 

A Late-Keltic sword -sheath with engraved scroll-work, 
two discs with enamel studs attached by rivets, and a pair 
of stout bronze rivets, found together in 1861 at Buckthorpe, 
near Stamford Bridge, E.R, Yorks ; given by Right Hon. the 
Viscount Halifax. 

An iron sword of La Tene type with part of another and 
a fragment of the bronze scabbard, found during excavations 
for Lockwood Reservoir, Walthamstow, Essex ; given by Sir 
Weetman Pearson, Bt., m.p. 

A typical series of flint implements from Belgium illus- 
trating the transition from eolithic to palaeolithic forms in 
that area ; from the Spiennes pits (Trouille valley) and the 
alluvium of the Haine valley ; given by Dr. A. Rutot. 

An extensive series of eolithic and palaeolithic flints from 
the neighbourhood of Thebes, Upper Egypt ; collected and 
given by Dr. G. Schweinfurth. 

Twenty flint implements from the heights above Thebes 
and Ermant, Upper Egypt ; given by Montagu Porch, Esq. 

Two hammer-stones found during excavations at Knossos, 
Crete, and probably from the neolithic stratum ; given by 
Mrs. Eustace Smith. 

A flake of purple flint found with fossil ox-bones in the 
gravels of Narbada River, Central Provinces of India ; given 
by Edward Bidwell, Esq. 

A series of small flint and quartzite implements from 
the coast of Victoria, near Melbourne ; given by Frederick 
Chapman, Esq., A.L.S. 

A. number of flint knives and implements from ancient 
mine heaps at Wady Maghara, and small knives and borers 
from an ash-bed at Wady Ahmar, Peninsula of Sinai ; given 
by the Egypt Exploration Fund. 



80 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A stone of oval form tapering to the top where it has 
a transverse groove ; obtained in Smyrna, and given by 
H. Swainson-Cowper, Esq., F.s.A. 

Bronze knife with pierced handle, belonging to the late 
Bronze Age of Denmark; given by C. H. Read, Esq., F.S.A. 

Two bronze statuettes and a series to show the manu- 
facture of ring-brooches found at Despena Perros, Sierra 
Morena, Spain ; given by Horace Sandars, Esq., f.s.a. 

(2.) Romano-British: — 

Enamelled bronze brooch, found at Warwick ; given by 
Mrs. Eustace Smith. 

Three bronze brooches of different types found at Lincoln ; 
given by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Handle of a bronze spoon, found at Lakenheath Warren, 
Suffolk ; given b}' G. F. Lawrence, Esq. 

An urn of grey ware, dredged from the Thames at Cook- 
ham, Berks ; given by R. E. Goolden, Esq., F.S.A. 

(3.) Anglo-Saxon and Foreign Teutonic : — 

An important series of jewellery, glass and bronze, includ- 
ing a massive gold ring of Roman work, from graves of the 
Anglo-Saxon period at Milton and elsewhere in Kent, from 
the Humphrey Wood Collection ; given through the National 
Art Collections Fund. 

Terminal of a penannular brooch, set with garnets in 
gold cell-work, from the Willett Collection ; given by Max 
Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

A massive gold finger-ring, set with a sard intaglio, found 
at Faversham, Kent. 

A gold ring of plaited strands, dating from the Viking 
period and found in a stone coffin, St. Aldate's, Oxford. 

Ornamented bronze square-headed brooch,found in Staple- 
ford Park, Saxby, Leics. ; given by Miss M. B. Dockray. 

Bronze buckle, with gilt plate deeply incised with animal 
design of the 6th century, from Icklingham, Suffolk. 

Bronze brooch of penannular type, but with the flattened 
terminals joined, from the Londesborough Collection. 

A large and important series of jewelled ornaments, beads, 
toilet articles, weapons and other ironwork, bronze vessels, 
glass and pottery of the Merovingian period, from the exten- 
sive cemetery at Herpes, near Angouleme, Dept. Charente, 
described by M. Philippe Delmain and others in Bulletin et 
Memoir es de la Socidte Archeologique et Historique de la 
Charente, 6th series, vol. 1 (1890-1), with album of plates. 



BRITISH AND MEDIAEVAL ANTIQTJITIES. 81 

A selection from antiquities discovered by M. Terechin in 
the Efaefsk grave-mound, near Krasnoslobedsk, Government 
of Pensa, Russia, comprising tresses of hair bound with bark 
and bronze rings, bronze brooches, bracelets, fasteners and 
iron knives : an account is given in the Hull Museum 
Quarterly Record, No. 4, March 1903. 

(4.) Mediaeval and Later : — 

(a.) British. — An inscribed silver brooch of the 14th cen- 
tury, from Clare, Suffolk, and a silver badge, with Our Lady 
of Loretto ; bequeathed by J. G. Waller, Esq., f.s.a. 

An alabaster carving, representing the Resurrection, in 
exceptional preservation, with gilt and coloured ground : 
English work, about 1500. 

Leaden badge with pearled edges, Gothic tracery and a 
crown, from Coventry ; given by Miss Dockray. 

Four mortuary crosses of lead, found with many others in 
graves on the site of Christ's Hospital, City of London. 

An unusually fine and elaborate ring-dial and perpetual 
calendar of gilt brass, made in 1575 by Humfrey Cole ; given 
by C. J. Wertheimer, Esq. 

Iron and copper bell, found in the Thames under Putney 
Railway Bridge. 

Bronze armorial pendant, found at ClifFe, Rochester: two 
monumental brasses, (i) a shield of arms impaled, from 
Newark, and (ii) a palimpsest fragment from Lincoln ; and a 
silver-gilt watch made by Wm. Camden, of London (1708-35) ; 
all given by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Gold watch with Roman and Arabic numerals, made by 
Daniel Quare, of London ; given by Max Rosenheim, Esq., 
f.s.a., through the National Art Collections Fund. 

Enamelled gold watch and fob-chain, made by Richard 
Clarke and Son, London ; given by Frederick Tessier, Esq, 

Copper medallion with Greek characters and magic 
symbols ; given by Dr. Tien. 

A ** terret " for guiding the reins over the horse's back, 
found at Great Missenden, Bucks ; given H. H. Rogers, Esq. 

A massive iron bridle bit with gilt rosettes, 16 th century. 

Pair of iron spurs with rowels, 17th century. 

Enamelled portrait of King William III., probably by 
Craft; and a topaz intaglio of King George XL, the back 
facetted ; given by Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

Saciamental flagon of pewter, from Seaford Church, 
Sussex, dated 1642, and a tipstaff and bronze toilet article, 
from Lincoln ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Gold Serjeant's ring, with the hall-mark of 1828. 



82 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(b.) Foreign. — Bronze matrix of the seal of Jacobus 
d'Ygnano, Doctor of Laws : Italian work ; given through the 
National Art Collections Fund. 

Reproduction of a seal-matrix of the monastery of 
Maienfeld, Orisons, Switzerland, 13th century ; given by Sir 
John Evans, k.c.b. 

Double bronze mould for statuette of the Virgin and Child, 
Flemish, ICth century ; and a leaden plaquette representing 
Music, by Peter Flotner : German, 16th century; given by 
Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

Cuir-bouilli cylindrical case, with whorls and floral scrolls, 
in which the church plate was kept at Whelnetham Parva, 
■Suftolk : 16th century. 

Ivory medallion, probably by Cavalier, of the Electress 
Palatine, Wilhelmine Ernestine (m. Charles, 1671 ; d. 1706). 

Eight wooden draughtsmen, stamped with busts and 
scenes : German, I7th century ; given by G. H. Lockner, Esq. 

(5.) Ceramic and Glass Collections : — 

(a.) Oriental Wares. — Plate of Turkish faience, 16th 
century ; given by H. J. Pfungst, Esq., F.S.A., through the 
National Art Collections Fund. 

Two Damascus tiles with blue decoration, 16th century ; 
and part of a pottery tile from the Temple of Heaven at 
Pekin ; given by Sidney Vacher, Esq. 

Five glazed bowls of the 13th century, found at Rakka, 
near Aleppo. 

Persian vase with turquoise glaze and black design, 14th 
century, from Bokhara; given by Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

Five Japanese bowls made in Kiyoto, Choshu and Itizen ; 
given by S. Stern, Esq. 

Beaker of celadon ware, probably of the early Ming 
period ; given by A. J. Sandars, Esq. 

Porcelain cup with Chinese representation of the Cruci- 
fixion ; given by L. A. Lawrence, Esq. 

Chinese vase with flambe glaze, in ormolu mount; be- 
queathed by L. Van Oven, Esq. 

Porcelain female figure, holding a child on left arm : 
Chinese, 18th century ; given by Max Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. 

Several pieces of Chinese porcelain and glazed pottery 
from Lhasa and monasteries in Tibet. 

(b.) Continental. — Maiolica albarello with quartered shield 
of arms in colours : Italian, 15th century ; and another with 
decoration in blue and lustre, of the 16th century, 

Maiolica statuette of exceptional size, representing St. 
Roch, perhaps Gubbio ware, and a jug of unusual form, both 
of the 16th century : given by C. Fairfax Murray, Esq. 



BKITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 8S 

A set of nine pottery tiles with tin- glaze and design in 
green, from Brioude, Haute Loire. 

Tile of red ware with remains of green enamel, 16th cen- 
tury, of French make, but found near Hurstpierpoint, Sussex ; 
given by A. E. Griffith, Esq. 

A series of Spanish wall-tiles, with heraldic and floral 
designs of the 16th century, mostly from Valencia ; given by 
Senor Don G. J. de Osma. 

Dresden figures of Hebe and Ganymede ; bequeathed by 
L. Van Oven, Esq. 

A French tile of the 16th century, from Tuxford, Notts., 
and another, perhaps of Flemish maiolica, from Watton Abbey 
E.R. Yorks; both given by Thos. Boynton, Esq., F.s.A. 

(c.) English. — Pottery jug of the Norman period, with 
traces of dark green glaze, found in Wood Street. London, 
1878 ; given by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, k.cm.g. 

Small glazed pot found full of plaster in the wall 
of Steeple-Gidding Church, Hunts. ; given by Rev. H. J. 
Molyneux. 

Four fragments of glazed ware, with green and yellow 
glaze, from Bristol ; given by Spencer G. Perceval, Esq. 

Glazed pottery fragments and kiln-rests from the church- 
yard, Eynsford, Kent ; given by E. D. Till, Esq. 

Wall-tile of Liverpool delft, and three other tiles, one 
from the River Hull ; given by Thos. Boynton, Esq., F.s.A. 

Liverpool wall-tile, printed in blue ; given by B. Dansie, 
Esq. 

Two mugs of Bristol porcelain, made for exhibition at 
the House of Commons in 1775 ; porcelain jug of Plymouth 
or Bristol ware, dated 1770 ; cofFee-cup of Bristol ware, 
dated 1774 ; and a Chelsea cream-jug of goat-and-bee pattern, 
dated 1745 ; all given by Charles Borradaile, Esq. 

Chelsea vase with painted butterflies and flowers, and gilt 
mount, from the Huth Collection. 

Three Chelsea and two Derby figures, also two of Derby- 
Chelsea ware ; bequeathed by L. Van Oven, Esq. 

Porcelain bowl with creamy glaze decorated in sepia, and 
marked Lane End, July 1787 ; given by F. Bennett Goldney, 
Esq., F.s.A., through the National Art Collections Fund. 

Marbled tea-pot, with gilt edging, marked Wedgwood and 
Bentley, and made at Etruria about 1770 ; given by C. B. 
Farmer, Esq. 

Cream-ware teapot, with Masonic arms and emblems, 
printed at Liverpool about 1770. 

Figure of a stag, with brown glaze, and Leeds ware mug 
with marbled glaze ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., F.S.A. 
124. G 



84 ACCOUNTS. ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Tin-glazed pot found with other specimens near Vauxhall 
Bridge, London, late 18th century ; given G. F. Lawrence, 
Esq. 

(d.) Glass. — Bowl with decoration in narrow bands, and 
a cup with coloured enamels, both of the Grseco-Roman 
period. 

Stibium-phial of graceful form, of the Roman period, from 
Jaffa ; given by Mrs. C. M. Reid. 

An important series of Roman and Merovingian specimens 
from the cemetery at Herpes, Dept. Charente. 

Amber- coloured bottle with applied decoration, and four- 
sided bottle on legs, both found at Tel Manes, near Aleppo. 

Fragmentary glass beads ploughed up at Minster, Thanet ; 
given by C. H. Read, Esq., F.s.A. 

Cuj) with conical purple bowl and winged stem, from the 
Adrian-Hope collection ; given by Murray Marks, Esq. 

A pair of vases with floral design in colours, of Bristol 
ware, from the Edkins Collection ; given by Charles Borra- 
daile, Esq. 

(6.) Collection illustrating various Religions : — 

(a.) Christianity. —Pottery flask of the Gth century, with 
figure of St. Menas and inscription in Greek ; given by M. 
Georges Manolakos. 

Pebble incised with Cross and Syriac characters, used as 
tombstone of a Nestorian Christian, and found near Issik-Kul 
Lake, Russian Turkestan ; given by Lord Osborne Beauclerk. 

(h.) Buddhism. — Cast of a soapstone tope, with inscription 
in Kharosthi characters, found in 1898 at Piprahwa, Basti 
district, United Provs. of India ; given by the Trustees of the 
Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Ancient Buddhist figures in bronze and inscribed plinth, 
from Bezwada, described in Journal of Royal Asiatic 
Society, 1895, p. 617 ; given by the Secretary of State for 
India in Council. 

Part of stamped brick, with 13 seated figures in relief and 
inscription below, found at Kyaukku cave temple. Pagan, 
Burma ; given by Robert Sewell, Esq. 

Eleven clay-sealings, stamped with deities and inscribed 
with invocations and the confession of faith, from Gya, 
Ladak district, Kashmir ; given by Mrs. Milne. 

Brass standing figure with silver canopy, and seated 
figure of crystal from Ceylon ; from the Nevill Collection. 

Wooden screen with inscriptions in Chinese, Tibetan, 
Mongolian and Manchu, recording the dedication of a figure 
from Lhasa in the Great Lama temple at Pekin. 



BRITISH AND MEDIAEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 85 

A number of brass, copper, wood and stone figures of 
deities, many containing manuscripts and charms, temple- 
vessels, pictures, furniture and book-covers, idol ornaments 
and charms, from Lhasa and monasteries in Tibet ; collected 
by Col. H. A. Iggulden during the expedition in 1904. 

Nine temple-pictures with representations of various 
deities in colours, from Tibet ; given by the Hon. Walter 
Rothschild, MP., and Charles Davis, Esq. 

A series of clay images and dagobas, used as votive 
offerings, and obtained by the donor from caves at Taklakot, 
Western Tibet ; given by Deputy-Commissioner C. A. 
Sherring. 

Brass candlesticks, bells and other temple-furniture from 
Corea (Emberley Collection). 

(c.) Br a kminism.— Br 8bss statuettes of divinities from 
India (William Simpson Collection). 

Two stone carvings, one decorated in black and gold, 
from Java. 

Three pebbles, with fossil marks, called Saligrama, all 
symbolizing Vishnu, from Vizagapatam ; given by R. W. 
Davis, Esq., i.c.s. 

(7.) Oriental and Ethnographical : — 

Asia.— An interesting series of weapons and utensils from 
the Jarawa of the South Andaman, collected during two 
reconnaissances in January and February 1902 (see Official 
Papers, extracts from the Reports and Diaries of Messrs, P. 
Vaux, C. G. Rogers, and M. Bonig, January-February 1902) 
given by Sir R. C. Temple, Bart., c.i.E. 

An interesting collection of utensils from the Malays of 
Perak, given by the Director of the Ethnological Museum, 
Perak. 

A bronze plate engraved with an inscription in Pali ; 
given by Edward Bidwell, Esq. 

Glass bangles, obtained near Naini Tal, India ; given by 
the Rev. F. Campbell. 

A pottery model of a lamp placed on graves, from Kohat 
near Peshawar, India, and an oil-flask from Meshed, Persia ; 
given by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, K.C.M.G. 

A stone carving in high relief, one of a series of portraits 
of Sindas of Jelbarga, from Arasibidi, Bijapur, Bombay ; 
given by J. F. Fleet, Esq., c.i.e. 

A copper vase, brass cymbals, a wicker shield, a woven 
hanging, and paper charms, collected during the expedition 
to Tibet in 1904, and given by Percival Landon, Esq. 

Impressions on paper of copper land-grants ; India ; given 
by the Secretary of State for India in Council. 

G 2 



8G ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BEITISH MUSEUM. 

An important series of hats and dresses, ceremonial and 
otherwise, together with personal ornaments and badges of 
rank, from Lhasa, Tibet ; collected by Capt. W. F. O'Connor 
during the expedition in 1904. 

A suit of old scale-armour taken at Phari Jong, showing 
affinities with the scale-armour of Siberia and Japan, and a 
series of rice-bowls and ornaments of Chinese porcelain from 
Lhasa, Tibet ; collected by Col. H. A. Iggulden during the 
expedition in 1904. 

An important collection of weapons, ceremonial and 
otherwise, carved and inlaid knives, utensils, and personal 
ornaments, from Ceylon. Collected by the late Hugh 
Nevill, Esq. 

An important series of tin ingots in the shape of animals, 
believed to have been used formerly as currency in the Malay 
States, and mentioned by travellers ; now obsolete. 

A gilt collar of Chinese workmanship, inlaid with stones 
and enamel, and engraved with an inscription in Langtshii 
script. 

A series of objects illustrating the ethnography of Corea, 
including temple furniture, and ancient bronze bowls from 
tombs of the Kuru dynasty at Taiku, Corea. 

The bezels of three bronze finger-rings, engraved, one 
with the figure of a woman and an inscription in Kharohsti, 
the second with the Nandi parfa and an inscription in 
Kharo.sthi, and the third with the device of a man strangling 
two snakes. 

An ethnographical series from Perak, including weights 
and measures, pottery, industrial appliances, and weapons. 

A trumpet of brass and copper taken from a Lama at 
Gyantse Jong, July 1904. 

A chalcedony seal of ancient Indian work, with two 
figures in intaglio, and a human face in relief on the back. 

A bronze candlestick, with engraved ornament, of the 14th 
cent., from Bokhara. 

Africa. — A collection of great interest representing the 
contents of a Juju-house in a mangrove-belt near Allabia in 
the Andoni Country, Southern Nigeria, which was destroyed 
by the Government in consequence of human sacrifices which 
had taken place there. Among the objects are a large ivory 
horn ornamented with four human skulls, a stool ornamented 
with goat-skulls, ceremonial swords and spears, and figures 
of cast bronze, showing considerable skill in workmanship, 
together with a large series of manillas of various sizes, some 
particularly large and ornamental ; given by the Government 
of Southern Nigeria. 



BKITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 87 

An extensive and important series of steatite carvings in 
human and animal form, together with iron weapons and 
ornaments, and a large number of pottery fragments, 
collected by Mr. D. Ranclall-Maclver and Mr. F. H. Andrews 
on the site of the ruins at Umtali, Rhodesia ; given by the 
Rhodes Trustees. 

A series of ethnographical objects from hitherto unexplored 
country in the neighbourhood of Lake Chad, and from. 
Liberia and Bornu ; given by P. E. Talbot, Esq. 

A pottery bowl from Socotra ; given by Sir W. T. 
Thiselton-Dyer, k.c.m.g. 

An ostrich-feather head-dress from East Africa ; given by 
the Hon. W. Rothschild, m.p. 

Four silver brooches and three cloths woven in colours, 
from the Kabyles of Algeria ; given by Mrs. Eustace Smith. 

A girdle made of long strips of monkey-skin, from the 
neighbourhood of Nairobi, East Africa Protectorate ; given 
by Sir J. W. Wolfe-Barry, k.C.b. 

A carved wooden knobkerry and pipe, from East Africa ; 
given by Sir J. W. Wolfe-Barry, k.c.b., and Lieut. R. P. Lewis. 

An interesting collection of fetish figures from West 
Africa. 

A statuette, drinking-horn, and two bells in bronze, and 
a carved ivory tusk from Benin. 

A series of interesting ceremonial masks and other objects 
from Southern Nigeria. 

A collection of personal ornaments, fetishes, and weapons, 
from the South-West French Congo. 

A carved stool and a fetish bowl for offerings, in wood, 
and two perforated stones, from the Baluba of the Congo 
Free State. 

A woman's brass neck-ring weighing 25f lbs., taken from 
the neck of a chief's wife on the Upper Lulanga River, Congo 
Free State. 

A series of so-called " gold-weights," in brass, from 
Ashanti. 

A carved wooden scoop from Angola, a ceremonial sword 
from the Gold Coast, a ceremonial dress and cap from the 
Masai, and a paddle. 

Oceania. — A series of weapons and textiles from the New 
Hebrides ; given by the Rev. W. H. Edgell. 

A stone flake, said to be used in initiation rites, and a 
glass spear head, from Esperance, Western Australia ; given 
by W. A. Harrison, Esq., Resident Magistrate and Local 
Protector of Aborigines. 

A feather head-dress from Cape York, Queensland, 
Australia ; given by D. C. Lee, Esq. 



88 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



An extensive series of fragments of remarkable pottery, 
with three finely engraved shells, and fragments of stone 
clubs and adze-blades, excavated at Collingwood Bay, British 
New Guinea ; given by C. A. W. Monckton, Esq., Resident 
Magistrate. 

A singularly fine specimen of a Maori torino, or flute, and 
a carved feather-box, from New Zealand ; a large bowl, a 
stool, and a tapa-beater, from Tahiti ; and a plaited sinnet 
cord from the Eastern Pacific. These specimens are un- 
doubtedly of considerable age, and exhibit unusual perfection 
of workmanship. 

A remarkable staff" with five knobs, four carved to repre- 
sent a pair of conventional human figures back to back, that 
in the centre two such pairs feet to feet. Between the knobs 
the staff" is bound ornamentally with sinnet braid. The 
specimen is of great interest ; the workmanship proves it to 
date back to the days of the early voyagers, and it was 
probably one of the local idols ; with it, a peculiar short, axe- 
shaped club, engraved with two conventionalized human 
figures carved on the butt ; probably from Earotonga. 

A series of carved boards, unusually rough stone clubs, 
and coco-nut spoons, and a pottery vase, from Port Romilly, 
New Guinea. 

America. — An extensive and valuable collection of per- 
sonal ornaments for use at dances and on other occasions, 
together with musical instruments, ceremonial objects, 
utensils, and weapons, from the Uitoto Indians of the Upper 
Amazon ; collected and given by M. E. Robuchon. 

An interesting series of weapons and personal ornaments 
from the highlands of British Guiana ; collected and given 
by Dr. (Jarl Bovallius. 

Vases and bowls of painted pottery from British Guiana, 
and a pottery owl from the Ojibway Indians of North 
America ; given by Sir W. T. Thiselton-Dyer, k.c.m.g. 

A series of stone celts from the Rio Tibagy, Brazil ; 
given by A. C. Gale, Esq. 

Two house-posts with totemic carvings, from British 
Columbia. 

A whale's-bone mallet from the North-West Coast. 
A implement used by the Eskimo in preparing gut. 

III. — Christy Collection. 

During the year 56 slips have been prepared for the 
Registration Catalogue, with sketches of the objects, and 
226 objects have been registered. The Christy Trustees have 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 89 

acquired by donation and purchase the following objects, 
which they have transferred to the Trustees of the British 
Museum : — 

I. — Prehistoric Antiquities of Europe, Asia, and 
Africa : — 

Donations. — Two implements of sandstone and ironstone 
from Hardwick Hall, Derby, and portion of a palseolith 
from Canterbury ; given by F. J. Bennett, Esq. 

A chert arrow-head from Sarsden, Chipping Norton, 
Oxon ; given by the Earl of Ducie, P.O., f.r.s. 

A series of palseoliths from the plateau of the Western 
Thebaid, Egypt, together with a number of similar types 
from Suffolk ; given by H. R. H. Hall, Esq. 

A dressed granite block, part of a wooden post, and 
a spherical hammer-stone from the Regina Ruins, South-East 
Africa ; given by Franklin White, Esq. 

TI. — Ethnography of Asia : — 

Donations. — A series of men's ornaments from Borneo ; 
given by Godfrey Hewett, Esq. 

A collection of weapons and ornaments from the Andaman 
Islands ; given by Mrs. Horsford. 

Native cooking-pots, baskets, and other objects of 
ethnographical interest from Sarawak, Borneo ; given by 
Dr. Charles Hose. 

A handsome specimen of the stringed instrument known 
as Vina, from Southern India ; given by Lady Huggins. 

A tinder-clock from Canton, models of Chinese coffins in 
wood and ivory, and a series of Japanese noshi, or symbolical 
presents ; given by C. Lund, Esq. 

A bamboo pipe, and an implement for watering sago, from 
the country behind Collingwood Bay, British New Guinea ; 
given by the Rev. W. R. Maunsey. 

A nose-flute from the Loi aborigines of Hainan, China ; 
given by E. T. C. Werner, Esq. 

A series of weapons, ornaments, musical instruments and 
other objects illustrative of the ethnography of Borneo and 
the Philippine Islands, collected by the donor's late son ; 
given by J. Whitehead, Esq. 

Purchase. — An extensive and highly important collection 
of ethnographical objects from Sarawak, Borneo, formed by 
Dr. C. Hose, Resident. It embraces objects connected with 
the worship and daily life of the various tribes, a remarkable 
series of carved and painted house-boards, a comprehensive 
collection of native-woven cloths, and specimens of the 
various types of currency. 



90 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

III. — Ethnography of Africa:— 

Donations. — Two pairs of stirrups, Hausa and Beri-beri, 
from Northern Nigeria ; given by Dr. Coker Adams. 

Five old beads, including one with chevron pattern, from 
Mendiland, West Africa ; given by A. W. Boddy, Esq. 

A Zulu covering from South Africa; given by G. F. 
Eastwood, Esq. 

A large buffalo-hide shield from the Nilotic Ja-Luo, on the 
north shore of Victoria Nyanza, Uganda Protectorate ; given 
by C. W. Hobley, Esq. 

A large and important series of weapons and utensils from 
the Bertat of the Upper Nile, collected by the late Major Guy 
de H. Smith, of the Egyptian Army ; given by Captain E. 
de H. Smith. 

An interesting helmet of felted human hair and brass 
plates worn by the Latuka, and five magic stones used by 
a rain-maker of the Bari people : Lake Rudolf and Upper 
Nile ; given by F. Spire, Esq. 

An ivory horn from the Upper Congo ; given by E. T. C. 
Werner, Esq. 

A collection of pipes, spoons, snuff-boxes, and bead-work, 
from South Africa ; given by J. Whitehead, Esq. 

IV. — Ethnography of Oceania and Australia : — 

Donations. -An interesting collection of weapons and 
utensils from the native tribes on the Victoria, FitzMaurice, 
and Goyder Rivers, North Australia ; collected and given by 
Captain J. Bradshaw. 

A cast of a flint implement from Tasmania in the Taunton 
Museum ; given by H. St. George Gray, Esq. 

A necklace of dentalium shells, from Roebuck Bay, North- 
West Australia ; given by Mrs. Tabor. 

Shell adze-blades from Ontong Java, fish-snare from 
Ysabel, bead-belt from Shortland, and other objects from 
Marovo and New Georgia, Solomon Islands ; given by C. M. 
Woodford, Esq. 

A native loom from Sikaiana ; given by Mrs. Woodford. 

V. — Antiquities and Ethnography of America : — 

Donations. — A pottery vase ornamented with designs in 
red and black, from the Moqui of Arizona ; given by W. 
Crewdson, Esq. 

An interesting series of bronze figures and pins from 
ancient graves at Cuzco, Peru ; given by W. Bruce Douglas, 

Esq. 



BRITISH AND MEDIAEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 91 

A stone cooking-vessei and lamp, and part of another 
cooking vessel of remarkable size, from Labrador ; given by 
Dr. W. T. Grenfell. 

Two stone implements from the United States of America ; 
given by H. R. H. Hall, Esq. 

A valuable series of published works relating to the 
excavation of mounds in Florida and Georgia, U.S.A. ; given 
by the author, Clarence B. Moore, Esq. 

An ancient pottery stamp from the Rio del Oro, Guerrero, 
Mexico ; given by F. J. M. E. Patmore, Esq. 

A fine leather apron and head-dress from the Jivaro 
Indians of the Upper Amazon ; given by F. W. Rudler, Esq., 
i.s.o. 

A feather head-dress from Guiana ; given by G. H. Slade, 
Esq. 

A bark receptacle containing charred human bones, found 
with other skeletons, most of which had been cremated, on 
the bank of the Eraser River, at Quesnelle ; given by J. 
Turner-Turner, Esq. 

Charles H. Read. 



92 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Coins and Medals. 

I. — Exhibitions. 

A series of Medals illustrating the history of the British 
Navy has been arranged, with labels, in two cases, as part of 
the Nelson Centenary Exhibition in the King's Library, and 
described in the official Guide to the Exhibition. 

The work of cleaning the Medals exhibited in the corridor 
adjoining the Medal Room has been begun, and over 400 
medals of the British, Italian, and German series have been 
carefully treated. 



IT. — Registration and Arrangement. 
1. Greek Series : — 

442 coins, recently acquired, have been registered and 
incorporated. 

36 coins, hitherto regarded as uncertain, have been 
identified and incorporated. 

3 tetradrachms, hitherto given to Cyrene, have been 
transferred to Scione in Chalcidice. 

86 electrum coins, discovered in the course of the British 
Museum excavations at Ephesus, and submitted to the Keeper 
of Coins, have been minutely examined, weighed and described. 

Several collections off'ered for purchase or donation have 
been examined, and, where desirable, selections have been 
made. Among these were numerous lots of miscellaneous 
Greek coins ; a large series of rubbings of coins chiefly 
of Thrace and Moesia ; a series of Corcyra ; 3 selections 
of coins of Greece and Asia Minor; 2 series of coins of 
Phoenicia; and a dealer's stock of coins of Kings of Macedon 
from Philip 11. to Perseus. 

The series of electrotypes and casts of coins not in the 
Museum has been expanded by the insertion of two cabinets, 
and a large series of electrotypes of coins in other collections 
and a collection of casts illustrating the Hunter Collection at 
Glasgow have been incorporated. 

The work of writing tickets giving references to the 
published catalogues has proceeded ; 885 have been written 
for Lydia and 50 for Parthia, and placed beneath the coins 
to which they refer. 

The indexes of Types in the Catalogues of the Grseco- 
Scythic Kings and of Parthia have been cut up and incor- 
porated in the combined index of Types of Greek Coins. 

Additions have been made to the Manuscript Bibliography 
of Greek Numismatics. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 93 

A hand-list of monograms and single letters, occurring as 
sole or chief types on Greek coins, has been drawn up with 
a view to facilitate identification. 

2. Roman and Byzantine Series : — 

479 coins recently acquired have been registered, and 
537 incorporated. 

A small find of bronze coins of the fourth century after 
Christ from Farnborough has been examined. 

Selections of coins desirable for the Museum have been 
made from a series of Roman Republican coins and a series 
of Byzantine coins off'ered by dealers. 

The coins of Nerva have been examined, and the un- 
published varieties noted for a foreign scholar. 

A collection of sulphur casts of coins not in the Museum 
has been arranged for reference in a separate cabinet. 

3. British and Colonial Series : — ■ 

12G coins, medals, and tokens recently acquired have been 
registered and 176 incorporated. 

A Tr-easure Trove from Kensington has been examined. 

The Medals of Schools and Societies have been arranged 
with fresh heading cards and labels in a new cabinet. 

4. Mediceval and Modern Series : — 

125 coins and medals recently acquired have been regis- 
tered and incorporated. 

The series of Poland, Denmark, Norway and Sweden have 
been transferred to new cabinets, and the coins of these 
countries from the Freudenthal Collection incorporated 
with them. 

151 coins of the Grand Masters of Malta, 104 coins of 
Siberia, 1,577 coins of the Italian States, and 127 of the 
Portuguese Colonies have also been transferred from the 
Freudenthal to the General Collection. 

The whole of the Italian series has been expanded and 
re-arranged with fresh labels and heading cards in 13 cabinets, 
An index of the various States, giving references to the cabinets 
has been drawn up to facilitate the consultation of the 
collection. 

The coins of the Emperors of Trebizond have been 
removed to a more suitable cabinet. 

A small selection of French and Spanish coins has been 
made from the Kensington Treasure Trove. 

A list of Visigothic coins has been examined, and a 
selection made of specimens required for the Museum. 



94 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The Italian medals of the sixteenth century have been 
transferred to new cabinets with fresh heading-cards and 
labels. Several rectifications have been made in the course 
of this transference. 

The medals of Italian States later than 1600 have 
been removed from the King's Cabinet and arranged with 
heading-cards and labels in a new cabinet. 

5. Oriental Series : — 

432 coins recently acquired have been registered and 
incorporated. 

29 lead coins of the period of the Andhras, belonging to 
some dynasty as yet unidentified, have been for the first time 
deciphered and arranged under the names of two kings. 

Numerous collections have been examined, and where 
desirable selections for the Museum have been made. Among 
these collections were : — -Several parcels of Oriental coins 
forwarded by the Superintendent of the Imperial Gazetteer 
of Baluchistan and the Hon. Secretary of the Asiatic Society 
of Bengal ; a large collection of coins of the Mongols of 
Persia and other Mohammedan dynasties of Persia and 
Transoxiana (over 160 selected) ; a collection of ancient coins 
of S. India (96 lead and copper Andhra coins selected) ; 
a small collection of Parthian and Sassanian coins formed in 
Persia. 

A number of" rare gold coins of the Gupta series, belonging 
to the Indian Museum, Calcutta, have been examined, and 
casts and descriptions made. 



III. — Catalogues. 

1. Catalogues of Greek Coins. 

Coins of Phrygia, by B. V. Head. 

The MS. of the text of this volume has been completed and 
passed for press, amounting to 429 pages, and Plates I. — XLII. 
have been photographed. 

Coins of Phoenicia, by G. F. Hill. 

The coins of Aradus have been weighed, described, and 
classified in chronological order, and the portion of the 
historical and numismatic Introduction relating to this city 
has been written. 

2. Catalogues of Roman Coins. 

Roman Republican Coins, by H. A. Grueber. 

Signatures B-X (= 160 pages) have been passed for press, 
and Plates I.-XXXV- have been photographed. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 



95 



Coins of the Byzantine Empire, by W. Wroth. 

The coins of Constans II. and of his successors to 
Nicephorus II., Phocas, inclusive (641-969 A.D.), have been 
classified,' weighed and described, the total number of 
specimens at present catalogued for this work being 3,053. 

3. Catalogues of British Coins and Medals. 
Handbook of the Coins of Great Britain and Ireland, by 

H. A. Grueber. A second issue of this work has been 
published. 

3Iedallic Illustrations of the History of Great Britain 
and Ireland, by H. A. Grueber. (Atlas of plates.) 

Parts III. and IV. comprising Plates XXI.-XL. have been 
printed and published. 

4. Catalogues of Oriental Coins. 

Indian Coins. — Andhras and Western Kshatrapas, by 
E. J. Rapson. 

Signatures B-D (=24 pages) have been passed for press, 
and Sig. E (= 8 pages) for revise. 



IV. — A cquisitions. 

The total number of coins and medals added to the 
Department during the year 1905 was 1.488, of which 129 are 
of gold, 659 of silver, 502 of bronze, and 198 of other metals. 

The following table shows the numbers of the new acqui- 
sitions classified according to the several series to which they 
belong : — 



Class. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Bronze. 


Other 

Metals, 

&c. 


Total. 


Greek .... 

Roman 

British and Colonial 

Mediaeval and Modern - 

Oriental . . - - 


3 

53 

8 

4 

61 


146 

4 

79 

50 

380 


290 
51 
24 
23 

114 


14 

79 
105 


439 
108 
125 
156 
660 


Total - 


129 


659 


502 


198 


1,488 



Of the above, 507 have been presented, viz., 42 of gold, 
148 of silver, 229 of bronze, and 88 of other metals. 

These donations are due to the generosity of the following 
benefactors, &c. : — 

The Corporation of the City of London ; the Trustees of 
the Hunterian Coin Catalogue Fund, University of Glasgow ; 
the Belgian Minister of the Interior ; the Darbar of the 
Dewas State, Central India ; the Egypt Exploration Fund ; 
the Government of Assam ; the Bombay Branch of the Royal 



96 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Asiatic Society ; the Asiatic Society of Bengal ; the Govern- 
ment of Bengal ; the Government of the Panjab ; the Govern- 
ment of the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh ; the Madras 
Museum ; the Siamese Government ; the Pan-American 
Mediteval Congress (Chile) ; the National Library of Kio 
de Janeiro ; the Royal Geographical Society ; the Phene 
Spiers Testimonial Fund ; W. C. F. Anderson, Esq. ; Col. J. 
Biddulph ; the Honourable R. N. Bland, Resident Councillor, 
Malacca; Miss Bode; W. C. Boyd, Esq. ; Alexander Caldwell, 
Esq. ; Col. Sir Neville Chamberlain, k.c.b. ; C. Delaval 
Cobham, Esq. ; G. T. Cooke, Esq. ; Evelyn Grant Duff, Esq. ; 
Sir John Evans, k.c.b., f.r.s. ; Prof. Percy Gardner, Litt.D. ; 
Commendatore Francesco Gnecchi ; W. A. Graham, Esq. ; 
H. A. Grueber, Esq., f.s.a. ; F. A. Harrison, Esq. ; F. W. 
Hasluck, Esq. ; Sir H. H. Howorth, k.c.i.e., f.r.s.; Capt. J. de 
M. Hutchinson, r.n. ; G. Macdonald, Esq., ll.d. ; C. E. G. 
Mackerell, Esq. (Bequest) ; E. W. G. Masterman, Esq. ; L. D. 
Montague, Esq. ; H. Allan Morgan, Esq. ; H. W. Norris, Esq. ; 
Rev. C. S. Painter ; M. E. Pariset ; Capt. D. G. Peart ; Herr 
Bernhard Perrot ; J. H. Pinches, Esq. ; G. M. H. Playfair, Esq., 
H.B.M. Consul, Foochow ; Prof. Harvey Porter ; C. H. Read, 
Esq., F.S.A. ; Mrs. C. M. Reid ; Major M. B. Roberts; Max 
Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. ; T. J. Salwey, Esq., J. P. ; Horace 
Sandars, Esq., F.S.A. ; E. J. Seltman, Esq. ; Capt. Eric H. 
Sharman ; Col. C. G. Shepherd; Cecil Smith, Esq., ll.d.; 
Samuel Smith, Esq. ; Messrs. Spink and Son ; Rev. L. Harding 
Squire ; C. Thomas-Stanford, Esq., F.S.A. ; Rev. Dr. Anton 
Tien; Alan J. B. Wace, Esq.; Percy H. Webb, Esq.; Sir 
Hermann Weber, m.d. 

Remarkable Coins and Medals. 
1. Greek Series : — 
Among the 439 Greek coins added to the National 
Collection during the year 1905, the following are the most 
important : — 

{a.) Europe: — 
Italy. — A silver coin of the city of Croton (wt. 18 grs.). 
Obv. Tripod : rev. Thunderbolt between star and eagle on 
column. 

A large bronze coin of Ca])ua. Obv. Head of Zeus; rev. 
Eagle on thunderbolt. 

Sicily. — Three coins of Agrigentum, including an archaic 
didrachm, with the shell of the crab on the reverse treated so 
as to suggest a grotesque face (c/. Imhoof-Blumer, " Choix," 
PI. viii., 263), also a rare didrachm of the same city of the 
period of finest art. 

A very rare bronze litra, struck probably at Herbessus 
about the time of Timoleon's League (345 B.C.). Obv. Head of 
Sikelia ; rev. Fore-part of a human-headed ball. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS ANP MEDALS. 9? 

A very fine obol of Naxos. Obv. Head of Dionysos ; rev. 
Bunch of grapes and vine-leaves. 

A rare archaic obol of Syracuse with a bearded head on 
the obverse. 

Mcesia Inferior. — A silver coin of the town of Callatia. 
Obv. Head of Artemis ; rev. A mounted archer. This coin is 
of an earlier date than any coins of Callatia hitherto 
published. 

Four silver drachms of the city of Istrus on the Euxine 
Sea, near the mouths of the Danube. These coins belong to 
the later half of the 5th or to the earlier half of the 4th 
cent. B.C. Their types, heads, upwards and downwards, of a 
divinity, resemblinfy the head of Helios on Rhodian coins, 
have been hitherto explained as those of the Dioscuri. 
Dr. Head is, however, inclined to think that they are simply 
symbolical of the rising and the setting sun. 

Sarmatia. — An interesting collection of coins of the 
Greek cities Olbia and Tyra in Sarmatia (S. Russia), 
comprising, with other rarities, an unique silver coin of 
Olbia. This collection also contains at least 8 specimens of 
the large bronze pieces of Olbia, remarkable as being the 
only Greek coins which were, not struck, but cast in moulds, 
like the Roman Acs grave. The most remarkable of these 
cast coins is one in the shape of a dolphin, nearly 4 inches in 
length. 

Tauric Chersonesos. — A bronze coin of Cercine, a city of 
which the Museum had previously no coins. 

Four silver coins of Panticapceum and two rare bronze 
coins probably of the same town, the obverse types of which 
are respectively a Satrap's head and the satrapal leather 
helmet. 

Thrace. — Four silver diobols of the city of Apollonia on 
the Euxine, struck in the 4th century B.C. Obv. Head of 
Apollo, facing ; rev. Anchor and cray-fish with abbreviated 
magistrates' names. 

A silver stater of the ^ginetic standard of the city of 
Abdera, dating from about 400 B.C. Obv. A rearing gryphon 
of remarkably fine style; rev. [AIJONYSAZ, the name of 
the eponymous magistrate : type, Head of bearded Dionysos 
crowned with ivy. This device was evidently chosen by the 
chief magistrate with especial reference to his personal 
name. 

A bronze coin of considerable rarity of Sadales, King of 
a part of Thrace in the 1st century B.C. 

A bronze " medallion " of Elagabalus, struck at Philippo- 
polis on the occasion of a festival called KENAPEICEIA 
TTY0IA. The reverse shows a view in perspective of an 
octastyle temple. 



98 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BEITISH MUSEUM. 

A bronze coin of Hadrianopolis of the time of Gordian III., 
on the rev. of which is a veiled woman conducted by two 
men ; at their feet are three small reclining figures, two of 
whom hold torches (a bridal scene ?). 

Macedon. — An archaic tetrobol of Mende with an ass on 
the obverse, above which is an eye, the distinguishing emblem 
of the neighbouring city of Scione. 

An unpublished hemidrachm of Scione, having on the 
obv. a head of Apollo (?), and on the rev. a helmet. 

A tetradrachm of Alexander the Great with a syrinx as 
an adjunct symbol on the reverse. 

A rare bronze coin of Philip V. [220-179 B.C.]. Obv. 
Bust of the River-god, Strymon, facing: rev. Artemis 
standing. 

A very rare tetradrachm bearing the names of the Roman 
governors [L. Julius] Cae[sar] Pr[aetor] and his Quaestor, 
Aesillas, B.C. 93-92. 

Pceonia. — A bronze coin differing from others previously 
known in the form of the ethnic riAONflN instead of 
nAIONHN. 

Thessaly. — A remarkable bronze coin of the time of 
Nero having on the obverse a bust of Peace and the inscr. 
EIPHNH ZEBAZTH ©EZZAAHN and on the reverse a 
personification of Thessaly (?) holding a horse by the bridle. 

Crete. — A tetradrachm of Gortyna of great historical 
interest and rarity. It was struck after the conquest of 
Crete By the Roman Proconsul, Q. Caecilius Metellus B.C. 67- 
66. On the obverse is the head of Roma wearing a winged 
helmet adorned on the side with an elephant's head, the 
family emblem of the Csecilii Metelli. On the reverse is the 
cultus-statue of Artemis Ephesia. The reason for the choice 
of this goddess for the type of a tetradrachm struck in Crete 
is quite unexplained (see Zeit. f. Num. x., 119). 

(6.) Asia: — 

Asiatic Bosporus. — A rare silver coin of Phanagoria. 

Pontus and Bosporus. — A very rare tetradrachm of Mith- 
radates the Great bearing the date 209 of the Pontic era 
(= 89-88 B.C.). 

Mysia. — A small electrum coin struck at Cyzicus 
(■^ stater) with a kneeling figure holding a tunny on the 
verse. 

A large " medallion" oi Miletopolis. Rev. the Emperor 
Gordian III. on horseback spearing a lion. 

Lycia. — Fifteen ancient silver coins^ mostly rare or un- 
known varieties. Among them are the folio wing : —An 
archaic stater, obv. Sphinx, rev. Crab holding a cray-fish 
in its claws ; a tetrobol, obv. Boar, rev. Head of a bearded 



BEPAKTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 99 

warrior ; a diobol, obv. Winged figure, rev. Gryphon ; also 
several specimens with names in Lycian characters of various 
native dynasts. 

Syria. — A tetradrachm, probably unique, of Antiochus I. 
or 11. of Syria, having on the ohv. a fine portrait of 
Antiochus I., and on the rev. the figure of a bearded 
Herakles, seated on a rock covered with the lion-skin. This 
is the prototype of the device which was afterwards adopted 
on the coins of King Euthydemus of Bactria. The mint-mark 
on this important coin is a one-handled vase, the symbol of 
the city of Cyme in Aeolis, a distinct proof that the coin, 
whether issued by Antiochus I. or II. (a doubtful point), was 
struck at Cyme, and consequently that that city was then 
subject to the King of Syria. 

Phoenicia.— A silver octadrachm of Sidon (5th century 
B.C.), an unpublished variety. Ohv. War galley ; rev. King in 
chariot, and date in Phoenician characters. 

A didrachm of Tyre. Obv. Melkarth riding on a Hippo- 
camp over the sea ; rev. Owl with flail. Date 279 B.C. 

Judaea. — A specimen of the rare shekel of Simon Bar- 
cochba, leader of the second revolt of the Jews (133-135 A.D.). 
Obv. Temple of Jerusalem represented as a portico with four 
columns ; above it is a star, the symbol of Barcochba (Son 
of the Star) ; rev. Ethrog and Lulab. 

Persia. — A silver siglos countermarked on one side with 
a triskelis, and on the other side with a crux ansata. 

(c.) Egypt :- 

Egypt. — A bronze coin of Naucratis of great rarity, from 
the same dies as the specimen first published by Dr. Head 
{Num. Chron., 1886, pi. I., 9), and attributed by him to the 
time of Ptolemy I., during the interval between the death of 
Alexander (323 B.C.), and the date of Ptolemy's assumption of 
the title of king (305 B.C.). 

Presented by the Egypt Exploration Fund. 

2. Roman and Byzantine Series : — 
Nine sestertii of the Emperors Claudius I., Hadrian, 
M. Aurelius, kc Presented by Percy Webb, Esq. 

A dupondius of Antoninus Pius and a bronze coin of 
Maximinus Daza. Presented by W. C. Boyd, Esq. 

A bronze medallion of Maximianus Herculius and an un- 
published bronze medallion of Marcus Aurelius, struck in 
commemoration of the conquest of Armenia (a.d. 162-165). 

A Romano-Gallic solidus of Valentinian III., found at 
Sittingbourne in Kent. 

124, H 



100 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

In the Byzantine series, 35 scarce and well-preserved 
gold solidi have been acquired, as well as the following 
coins : — 

A rare bronze coin of Phocas and Leontia. 

Presented by Alan J. B. Wace, Esq. 
A unique solidus of Philippicus (a.d. 711-712), struck at 
Rome. 

Two rare solidi of Anastasius II, (a.d. 713-715), struck 
by this usurper during his brief reign. 

A solidus of great rarity of Alexander (son of Basil I.) 
whose sole reign (a.d. 912-913) lasted only one year. On 
the obverse he is shown under the protection of a saint, 
apparently St. Alexander. 

3. British and Colonial Series : — 
The pattern Crown of Cromwell, by Thomas Simon. 

The pattern " Reddite " Crown of Charles II., by Thomas 
Simon. 

The pattern Crown, 1662, of Charles II., by Jan Roettier. 

These three rare pieces, which are in the finest state of 
preservation, were 

bequeathed, by the late G. E. G. Mackerell, Esq, 

A Spanish Dollar of Ferdinand VII., countermarked for 
English currency. Presented by W. A. Graham, Esq. 

A seventeenth-century token of Lambeth. 

Presented by T. J. Sahuey, Esq., J. p. 

A seventeenth-century token of Wellington in Oxford- 
shire. Presented by Miss Bode. 

Two bronze Tokens of 1838, found in Ireland. 

Presented by Col. Sir Neville Gha'unberlain, k.c.b. 

Medals. — Attack on the Isle of Rhe, 1688 (cp. Medallic 
Illustrations, I., p. 248). The snail pierced by an arrow refers 
to the tardy movements of the English troops on the occasion. 

Coronation of James II. and Mary. Reverse, the Sun 
in splendour. An unpublished silver medal by G. Bower. 

Landing of William Prince of Orange at Torbay in 1688. 
Reverse, inscription in Dutch referring to the raising of the 
Prince's Standard at Exeter. An unpublished silver medal. 

National Association for King William, formed in 1696. 
In pewter. 

Bombardment of Tonningen and Copenhagen by the 
English, Dutch and Swedish Fleets in 1700. Extremely rare. 

Foundation of the Ouzel Galley Society by Dublin 
merchants in 1700, to determine commercial disputes by 
arbitration. A gold medal, unique in this metal. 

Defeat of the French and Spanish Fleets in Vigo Bay in 
1703. Reverse, Neptune and Queen Anne. An unpublished 
silver medal, of Dutch workmanship. ^ 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 101 

Negotiations for Peace, 1707. Reverse, two hands joined. 
No specimen of this silver medal was known to the editors of 
the " Medallic Illustrations." 

Capture of Bethun, St. Vincent and Aire, 1710. Not 
published in the " Medallic Illustrations." 

Ten Dutch satirical medals relating to John Law the 
Financier, 1720. 

The badge of the True Patriotic Society in silver. Ex- 
tremely rare. 

Marriage of Frederick, Landgrave of Hesse, and Mary, 
daughter of George II., 1740. 

Coronation visit of Their Majesties King Edward VII. and 
Queen Alexandra to the City of London, 25th Oct. 1902. 
Presented by the Corporation of the City of London. 
A portrait-medal of John Pinches, the engraver. 

Presented by John H. Pinches, Esq. 
Bronze medal of the Berks Education Committee. 

Presented by Prof. W. G. F. Anderson. 

A bronze replica of the gold medal awarded to Capt. R. 
Falcon Scott, of the Antarctic Expedition, 1902-1904. 

Presented by the Council of the Royal Geographical 
Society. 

Portrait-medal of Mr. R. Phene Spiers, by E. Lanteri, 
1905. 

Presented by the Committee of the Phene Spiers 
Testimonial. 

4. Mediaeval and Modern Series : — 

Bulgarian and Hungarian silver coins of 'the fourteenth 
and fifteenth centuries. 

Presented by Horace Sandars, Esq., F.S.A. 

Nineteen Spanish silver coins of the reign of Ferdinand 
and Isabella. 

A double Louis d'Or of Louis XVI. and two others of 
Charles III. of Spain, selected from the Kensington Treasure 
Trove, 1905. 

Six copper and sixty-eight tin coins, chiefly Portuguese, 
Dutch, and Colonial of Malacca. 

Presented by the Hon. R. iV. Bland, Resident, Malacca. 

Twenty-one bronze coins of four Princes of Kilwa, German 
East Africa. Presented by Herr Bernhard Perrot. 

Two lead coins from Lamu. East Africa. 

Presented by Capt. J. de M. Hutchinson, r.n. 

A Russian platinum coin of 1834. 

Presented by Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

H 2 



102 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A bronze medal with the bust of Pope Nicholas V., and 
reverse, View of Rome. 

Presented hy Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

Five bronze medals of Apostles, Italian work, circ. A.D. 
1530. Presented hy Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

A bronze Papal modal with a bust of Christ" on the obverse, 
1625. Presented hy Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

A German lead medal, sixteenth century, of Hans Han, 
" Formenschnider." 

Presented hy Sir John Evans, k.c.b., f.r.s. 

Five silver, two pewter and one bronze-gilt medals 
bearing the head of Christ ; German work of the sixteenth, 
seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. 

Two specimens (silver and bronze) of the medal struck 
in 1905 in commemoration of the Belgian Independence. 

Presented hy the Belgian Minister of the Interior. 

5. Oriental Series : — 

Hindu. — One bronze and ninety-five lead coins of the 
Andhra Dynasty of Southern India, from the collection of 
R. Sewell, Esq., I.c.s. (retired). 

Twenty-five bronze coins of various Rajput Dynasties. 
Presented hy Major M. B. Roherts. 

Mohammadan. — Five gold, 157 silver, and four bronze 
coins of various Mohammadan Dynasties, including the 
Shaybanids, the Chagatai Mongols and the Timurids, from 
the collection of the late E. E. Oliver, Esq., m.r.a.s. 

A dirhem of the Caliph Sulaiman, struck at Maisau, 
A.D. 96. Presented hy Prof. Harvey Porter. 

Siamese. — Ten gold, twenty-four silver, seven bronze and 
four nickel coins of Siam of the five sovereigns of the reigning 
dynasty from 1782 to the present time. 

Presented hy His Majesty the King of Siam. 

V. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits made to the Department of coins and 
medals by students and others during the year 1905, was 
4,411. 

Barclay V. Head. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 103 

X.— British Museum (Natural History). 



STATEMENT of Progress made in the Arrangement and 
Description of the Collections, and Account of 
Objects added to them, in the Year 1905. 

General Progress. 

Visitors. 

In 1905, for the first time since the opening of the Natural 
History Museum, the number of visits paid to the galleries by 
the public in any one year exceeded half a million, the total 
number recorded being 506,313, an increase of 95,756 over the 
total in 1904, and of nearly 80,000 over that of any previous 
year. The number of visits recorded as having been made on 
Sunday afternoons was 70,084, as against 60,909 in 1904. 

The average daily attendance for all open days during 
the year was 1,560 • 09 ; for week-days only, 1,600 • 73, and for 
Sunday afternoons, 1322 • 34. 

Swiney Lectures. 

Dr. J. S. Flett delivered a course of Swiney Lectures on 
Geology in the autumn, commencing on Monday, 6th Novem- 
ber, and finishing on Friday, 1st December, the subject being 
"The Geological History of Great Britain." The lectures, 
12 in number, were given in the theatre of the Victoria and 
Albert Museum, by permission of the Board of Education, 
and were attended by an average of 328 persons per lecture, 
as compared with 248 in 1904. 

The Trustees have appointed Dr. R. F. ScharfF, Keeper of 
the Natural History Collections of the Dublin Museum, to 
the Swiney Lectureship for the two years 1906-7. 

Reproduction of Diplodocus. 

The reproduction of the skeleton of the remarkable 
extinct reptile, Diplodocus carnegii, presented by Mr. 
Andrew Carnegie to King Edward VII., and transferred by 
His Majesty to the British Museum, has been placed in the 
Reptile Gallery, the mounting of the specimen having been 
carried out under the superintendence of Dr. W. J. Holland, 
Director of the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, U.S.A. The 
ceremony of presentation took place on the 12th May, when 
Mr. Carnegie was present, and Lord Avebury, on behalf of 
the Trustees, received the specimen in the presence of a 
representative gathering of about 300 persons. Mr. Carnegie 
defrayed the entire cost of mounting and of the handsome 
mahogany base on which the specimen rests. 



104 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The " Discovery " Antarctic Expedition Report. 

Early in the year a circular was issued showing that the 
work had been divided into 50 subjects, which have been 
distributed among 43 specialists. 

Dr. Wilson and Mr. Ferrar, two of the members of the 
scientific staff of the Expedition, have nearly completed their 
reports, and the manuscripts will shortly be sent to the 
printers. 

Mr. Hodgson, also of the scientific staff, has been largely 
occupied in separating out the contents of the collections 
of Animal Plankton ; this work was completed early in 1906 ; 
and the specimens will now be distributed among various 
specialists. 

New System of Drainage. 

Provision has been made in Class I. of the Estimates for 
a new drainage system for the entire building, and the work 
is being carried out under the supervision of the Office of 
Works. 

Purchases. 

Among the more important acquisitions made by purchase 
during the year, special mention may be made of the 
following : — Selections from the late Mr. R. F. Tomes's 
collections of natural history, including 8,853 English fossils 
and about 800 specimens of mammals (30 being types) ; the 
first portion of Dr. D. Sharp's extensive collection of coleop- 
terous insects, this instalment, consisting of about 22,000 
specimens of Dytiscidce, or water-beetles, about 500 being 
types ; a series of about 5,000 specimens of Coleoptera of the 
family Gassididce, selected from the collection of the late 
Dr. Baly, and including 192 types ; an extensive collection 
of birds, eggs, and insects obtained by Mr. W. Foster in 
the interior of Paraguay ; three skeletons of natives of the 
Andaman Islands ; 2,615 Jurassic fossils selected from the 
collection of the late Mr. E. Witchell, including type and 
figured specimens, and many rare species ; a selected series of 
vertebrate fossil remains from the Oxford Clay of Peter- 
borough ; three meteoric stones from Wavbreccan, Central 
Queensland, the only known representatives of the fall ; and 
a selected series of fossils from the carboniferous limestone 
of Belgium, comprising 400 forms, of which 300 are new to 
the Museum. 



Bequests. 

The late Mr. Alexander Fry, of Norwood, bequeathed 
to the Museum his magnificent collection of coleopterous 
insects, the catalogue thereof, and his entomological library. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 105 

By this munificent bequest the national collection of Coleop- 
tera has been enriched by nearly 200,000 specimens, including 
numerous types and rarities new to the Museum. 

Another bequest made last year to the Museum was that 
of the late Mr. Edward Cavendish Taylor, comprising a 
collection of 1,279 birds, 868 eggs, and 33 mammals, together 
with the cabinets containing the specimens. 

Presenta. 

The total number of presents recorded as having been 
received during the year by the several Departments of the 
Museum was 2,092, as against 1,933 in 1904. Many of these 
comprised large numbers of individual specimens. The details 
of all the more important of them will be found in the reports 
of the Keepers of the several Departments, but the following 
are mentioned here also as being of special interest or 
importance : — 

From His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. — A bronze 
statuette, modelled by Captain Adrian Jones, of " Persimmon," 
the thoroughbred stallion belonging to His Majesty the King. 

From His Grace the Duke of Bedford, K.G. — A series of 
mammals and birds from Japan, being a first instalment of a 
collection which is being formed in East Asia by Mr. M. P. 
Anderson, who has been sent out by the Duke to make a 
systematic zoological exploration of that part of the world. 

From Mr. Andrew Carnegie. — A plaster cast of the 
skeleton of the remarkable extinct reptile Diplodocus, 
together with the handsome mounting of the specimen. {See 
ante, p. 103.) 

From Dr. Alfred Eussel Wallace. — An interesting series 
of pencil drawings of fishes of the Rio Negro, made by 
Dr. Wallace during his travels in South America about 
fifty years ago. 

From W. 0. B. Macdonough, Esq. — The skull and limb- 
bones of the celebrated thoroughbred stallion " Ormonde," 
formerly owned by the Duke of Westminster. 

From Captain H. J. Walton, I.M.S. — A collection of birds 
made by him during the recent British expedition to Tibet. 

From F. Du Cane Godman, Esq., LL.D., F.R.S.— Further 
consignments of Central American insects, consisting of 
8,618 Coleoptera, 4,727 Lepidoptera, 885 Homoptera, and 196 
Ephemeridse ; also a valuable series of about 5,000 specimens 
of Spiders from Central America. 

From Colonel G. Rippon.— A collection of birds obtained 
by him while exploring little known parts of Burma and 
Western China, consisting of 335 specimens from the 
Kauri-Kachin district, and 1,260 from Mt. Victoria in the 
Chin Hills. 



106 ACOOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

From E. G. B. Meade Waldo, Esq. — A collection of birds 
chiefly from the Canary Islands and Morocco. 

From Mrs. Stoddart. — 278 folios of water-colour drawings 
of Japanese fishes, prepared by Japanese artists for the late 
Mr. J. Meldrum Stoddart during his residence in Nagasaki. 

From C. D. Rudd, Esq. — Further large collections of 
zoological specimens from S. Africa. 



Exchanges and Gifte of BuiMcate Specimejis. 

Exchanges of duplicate specimens have been made with 
several institutions and individuals. 

The following have been placed on the list of institutions 
to receive grants of duplicate specimens of Natural History, 
namely : — The Surveyors' Institution ; the Froebel Institute, 
West Kensington ; Alleyn's School, Dulwich ; Huddersfield 
Museum ; Moyses Hall Museum, Bury St. Edmunds ; and 
Rochdale Museum. 

Selections of duplicate specimens have been presented as 
follows : — 

Of zoological specimens — to Liverpool University ; La 
Plata Museum ; the museum of St. Paul's School Field Club ; 
the Sir John Cass Technical Institute ; Wimbledon Technical 
Institute ; the Technical Education Board of the London 
County Council ; the Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh ; 
Eton College Museum ; Campden School of Arts and Crafts, 
Chipping Campden ; Mr. R Piingeler ; Dr. W. Barnes ; Mr. 
H. d'Orbigny ; Prof. Y. Sjostedt, of Stockholm Museum; 
Mr. M. A. Regimbart ; Prof. C. Aurivillius ; Mr. J. H. Fleming, 
of Toronto ; and Mr. W. Cross, of Colorado. 

Of fossils and casts of fossils — to University College, 
Aberystwyth ; St. Paul's School Museum ; the American 
Museum of Natural History, New York ; the Carnegie Museum, 
Pittsburgh, U.S.A. ; the Surveyors' Institution; the Royal 
Albert Memorial Museum, Exeter ; Worcester Museum ; Mr. 
Frank Springer ; and Prof. E. Koken. 

Of minerals — to the Ward Schools, Aldersgate Street, 
E.C. ; the Sir John Cass Technical Institute ; and Dr. Charles 
Hose, of Sarawak. 



Publications. 

The under-mentioned works on Natural History have been 
published during the year : — 

Catalogue of the collection of Birds' Eggs in the British 
Museum (Natural History). Vol. IV. Carinatse (Passeri- 
formes continued). By E. W. Gates and Captain Savile G. 
Reid. Pp. xviii, 352 : 14 coloured plates. 8vo. 30s. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 107 

Catalogue of the Lepidoptera Phalsense (Moths) in the 
British Museum. Vol. V. Noctuidse (Hadeninse). By Sir 
G. F. Hampson, Bart. Pp. xvi, 634 : 172 woodcuts. 8vo. 15s. 
Atlas of 18 coloured plates. Svo. 15s. 

Catalogue of the Madreporarian Corals in the British 
Museum (Natural History). Vol. V. The Family Poritidse. 
II. — The Genus Porites. Part I. — Porites of the Indo-Pacific 
Region. By H. M. Bernard. Pp. vi, 303 : 35 plates. 4to. 
35s. 

Illustrations of Australian Plants collected in 1770 during 
Captain Cook's voyage round the World in H.M.S. 
" Endeavour." Being a series of lithographic reproductions 
of copper-plates engraved for Sir Joseph Banks and Dr. 
Solander. With determinations by James Britten. Part III. 
77 Plates, with 26 pages of descriptive text (pp. 77-102) and 
3 maps. Fol. 25s. 

Catalogue of the Fossil Plants of the Glossopteris Flora 
in the Department of Geology. Being a Monograph of the 
Permo-carboniferous Flora of India and the Southern Hemi- 
sphere. By E. A. Newell Arber. Pp. Ixxiv, 255 : 51 figures 
and 8 plates. 8vo. 12s. 6d. 

Guide to the Gallery of Birds in the Department of 
Zoology. (By W. R. Ogilvie Grant.) Pp. iv, 228 : 24 plates 
and 7 figures. Roy. Svo. 2s. 6d. 

Part I. General Series. Pp. 149. Roy. Svo. 

6d. 

Part II. Guide to the Nesting Series of British 

Birds. Pp. 62 : 4 plates. Roy. 8vo. 4J. 

Guide to an Exhibition of Old Natural History Books, 
illustrating the . . . study of Natural History to the 
time of Linnaeus. (By B. B, Woodward.) Pp. 27. 8vo. 3cL 

Copies of these works have been sent to many Free 
Libraries and other institutions in Great Biitain and Ireland, 
to Colonial, Indian, and Foreign Museums, Libraries, and 
Scientific Societies, and to various individuals who have 
either assisted in the preparation of the volumes or otherwise 
benefited the Museum. 

Selections of the Natural History publications of the 
Museum have been presented to several institutions and 
individuals. 

Arrangements have been made with several additional 
institutions for an exchange of publications. 

New editions have been issued of the Guide to the Shell 
and Starfish Galleries price 6d. ; Guide to the Fossil Reptiles 
Amphibians, and Fishes, price 6d. ; Guide to the British 
Mycetozoa, price Sd. ; the Students' Index to the Collection 
of Minerals, price 2d. ; Directions for Collecting Mammals 
and Blood-sucking Flies, price 3<i. each. 



108 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The following works are in preparation : — 

History of the Collections, Vol. II., Zoology. 

Catalogue of the Library, Vol. III. 

Hand-list of Birds, Vol. V., by R. B. Sharpe. 

Catalogue of Birds' Eggs, Vol. V., by E. W. Gates, revised 
and completed by W. R. Ogilvie Grant. 

Report on the Natural History Collections of the *' Dis- 
covery " Antarctic Expedition. 

Catalogue of Moths, Vol. VI., by Sir G. F. Hampson, Bart. 

Catalogue of Cicadidse, by W. L. Distant. 

Illustrations of British Blood-sucking Flies. First Series. 

Catalogue of Corals, Vol. VI., by H. M. Bernard. 

Catalogue of the Fossil Vertebrata of the Fayum, by 
C. W. Andrews. 

Catalogue of Fossil Rodentia, by C. I. Forsyth-Major. 

Catalogue of Fossil Fishes, Vol. V., by A. Smith Woodward. 



General Library. 



The additions to the General Library during the past year 
have been : — 

By purchase - . _ 346 volumes. 
By donation - - - 516 volumes, 8 maps, and 

52 photographs. 

Total - - 883 volumes, 8 maps, and 
52 photographs. 

All the volumes and maps have been catalogued, press- 
marked, and put in their places, while 111 volumes have 
been bound in 91. 

The extent of the collection on the 31st December was 
34,807 volumes, 5,607 maps, and 315 photographs (not includ- 
ing those in the Owen Collection of Drawings, &c.). 

The accessions to the Departmental Libraries have also 
been catalogued as they came in, and duplicate transcripts of 
the titles have been returned with the books. 

Altogether 2,325 title-slips have been written, 78 re- 
written, and 2,644 revised. 

There are now, on a rough estimate, 81,813 volumes 
(exclusive of continuations and minor separata) and 5,870 
maps in the whole building. 

The printing of the Catalogue has been continued, and the 
work at the end of the year stood as follows : — 

No. of sheets passed for press (A — Lind) - 140 

No. of title-slips set up in type (A — Linn) - 32,841 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 109 

The increase in routine work has, however, seriously- 
delayed this undertaking. 

An exhibition of old Natural History Books, illustrating 
the origin and progress of the study of Natural History up 
to the time of Linnaeus has been temporarily placed on show 
in the Central Hall, and a guide thereto has been prepared 
and put on sale. 

The compilation of a list of Books, »fec., published by, or 
relating to the Natural History Departments of the British 
Museum, has been begun. 

Seven sets of sheets 131-136 of the Catalogue have been 
stamped with index-letters showing in which Department 
the various works are to be found, and copies have been 
supplied to each Department. 

The permanent card-catalogue has been mounted as far as 
the end of sheet 140, and the work of transferring to it 
the press-marks and other memoranda from the old temporary 
slips has been carried on as far as the end of sheet 118. 

The number of visits paid to the Library during the year 
by students and others (irrespective of the staff and persons 
to whom the use of a key is granted) was 1,157. 



Index Museum and Morphological Collections. 

Of the additions made during the past year to the 
exhibits in the Central Hall, the most noteworthy is a series 
of hybrid Maize cobs grown in Ceylon by Mr. R. H. Lock for 
the purpose of verifying Mendel's theory of heredity, and 
presented by him to the Museum. 

In the " Malaria Case " the various parts of the head, legs 
and wings of the enlarged models of Culex, Anopheles and 
Ghironomus have been labelled, and the series has been 
augmented by the addition of a model of the piercing 
apparatus of Culex, drawings of the head of Ghironomus, * 
male and female, and drawings of the piercing organs of 
Culex and Anopheles. 

Eight specimens have been added to the osteological series 
in the wall-cases of the first recess on the west side of the 
Hall ; a map showing the distribution of the known species 
of Glossina in Africa has been mounted ; and the case 
containing the specimens illustrating the anatomy of the 
Lancelet has been removed from its position upon the ill-lit 
end wall of the fifth recess on the west side to a prominent 
position at the entrance to the recess. A considerable amount 
of work has also been done in the way of remounting and 
respiriting such of the anatomical preparations in the Hall 
as were in need of attention. 



110 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The case illustrative of Ankylostomiasis or Miner's 
Disease, which was set out in 1903, continues to attract con- 
siderable attention. A label giving an account of the recent 
discoveries of Prof. Looss has been added during the last 
year. 

A case containing eggs of parasitic and non-parasitic 
Cuckoos, &c., has been placed in the Hall. 

Seventy-six specimens of fishes have been restored and 
coloured according to published coloured figures and descrip- 
tions, in continuation of the work begun in 1904. The wall- 
cases of the south half of the Fish Gallery have been re- 
painted, and the specimens replaced, with the exception of the 
Pleuronectids, the series of which is not yet complete. The 
Sword-fish case also has been repainted, and the specimens 
coloured and re-arranged. Large coloured drawings have 
been added of Regalecus, 2'rachypterus, Cladoselache and 
Xenacanthus, and models of Climatius and Pterichthys. 
The head and pelvic fins of the specimen of the Basking 
shark, caught off" Shanklin, have been set up, with three fossil 
clasper-spines, for comparison with those of the recent shark ; 
and progress has been made with the restoring and mounting 
of the large sharks hanging from the roof and side rails. A 
card catalogue of the 350 specimens selected for exhibition in 
the south half of the gallery has been drawn up, giving the 
register number and history of each specimen and the figures 
and descriptions from which it was coloured. 



Economic Zoology. 

The work in connection with this section has been very 
similar to that of the previous year. The numerous questions 
submitted had reference chiefly to insects : many of them 
from medical men who are investigating the spread of diseases 
through the instrumentality of insects, others from various 
persons who ask advice respecting some pest, or for the name 
of some injurious insect. 

A considerable number of additions have been made to 
the series of exhibits in the^North Hall. Among them the 
following may be specially mentioned : — 

Examples of spruce fir showing the injury caused by Pine 
Weevils {Hylohius abietis). 

Cotton plants showing the injuries c*used by various 
insects, specimens of which are exhibited, including the 
" Egyptian cotton boll worm " (Earias insulana), and the 
" Egyptian cotton worm " {Prodenia littoralis). 

The Malay Sugar-cane borer (Phragmatcecia), with 
examples of the moth and damaged cane. 



ECONOMIC ZOOLOGY. Ill 

Durra leaves damaged by the Durra Aphis (Aphis sorghi, 
Theob.), with specimens of the insect, and also its Lady-bird 
enemies, Chilomenes vicina and Coccinella 11-punctata. 

Specimens illustrating the life-history of the Willow Aphis 
{Lachnus viminalis), with examples of the leaves and wood 
injured by them. 

Examples of the Cabbage Aphis {Aphis brassicce), which 
has recently been causing much damage in Essex and Kent. 

Specimens showing the injury caused to rose bushes by 
scale insects, or the " Scurvy Bark Louse" {Biaspis rosoe) ; 
also examples of various moths, the caterpillars of which 
feed on roses. 

Peas attacked by the larvse of a small fly, or " Pea Midge" 
{Diplosis pisi). 

Wine corks bored by caterpillars of Oinophila v-fiava ; 
and of the Fig Moth {Ephestia ficella). 

Hide damaged by Ox Warble. 
The following are some of the subjects of inquiry : — 
(1.) Specimens of Indian House-fly (Musca determinata) 
and other flies sent for determination as possibly 
conveying disease from filth trenches. 

(2.) A biting fly, Stomoxys calcitrans, sent from India for 
determination as not improbably conveying disease. 

(3.) A small fly, Simulium damnosum, sent for deter- 
mination from Uganda. Its bite causes great 
irritation and produces large swellings and sores. 

{4s.) Pangonia zonata and other Horse-flies (Ta^amcZoe;, 
believed to disseminate a fatal disease among horses 
in Somaliland. 

(5.) Two kinds of gnat {Theobaldia annulata and 
Anopheles maculipennis) sent for determination. 
These were so troublesome in Somersetshire as to 
make the use of mosquito curtains necessary. 

(6.) Midges (Chironomus riparius) causing great annoy- 
ance at Wandsworth. Sent for determination, and 
with inquiry as to their origin, from the Medical 
Officer of Health. 

(7.) Household mites (Glyciphagus domesticus), infesting 
furniture, sent for advice. 

(8.) Larvae of a moth, " Bag-worms " {Psychidce) sent for 
determination from British Central Africa. Sup- 
posed by the natives to be poisonous to cattle. 

(9.) Growing coff'ee-berries injured by weevils {Scolytidce) 
in Angola. 

(10.) Fruit-flies (Geratitis capitata) in South Africa and 
West Australia. 



112 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

(11.) Fish-insects {Lepisma) from various places, injuring 
photograph, altar cloth, on picture, and on 
palliasses. 

(12.) Underground lead-covered electric cable injured, 
apparently by White- ants (Termites) in Hong Kong. 
A somewhat similar question was submitted re- 
specting overhead telegraph cables. In this case 
the injury seemed to be due to lightning. 

(13.) Cocoa-nut trees greatly damaged by beetles (Calan- 
dra stigmaticollis and Melittomma insular e) in 
the Seychelles. 

(14.) Wooden bread platters pierced by small beetles 
[Lyctus canaliculatus). 

(15.) Caterpillars of a butterfly (Rhopalocampsa juno), 
very injurious to cocoa-nut palms. Sent for deter- 
mination from Aburi, Gold Coast. 

(16.) Specimens of a Long-horned Locust (Phaneroptera 
4>-punctata) in a vinery near Chester ; imported. 

(17.) LarviB of a Longicorn Beetle {Macrotoma natala), 
damaging hardwood timber used in a temporary 
railway bridge in British Central Africa. 

(18.) Live Cockroaches imported from West Indies in 
bananas, Nyctehara tenehrosa, and Periplaneta 
americana from Scarborough. 

(19.) Hothouse grapes injured by a fly {Drosoijhila 
melanogaster) near Huddersfield. 

(20.) Cigarettes badly injured by a small beetle {Lasio- 
derma tectacea) ; sent by a London firm. 

E. Ray Lankester, 
British Museum (Natural History), Director. 

2 February 190G. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 113 



Department of Zoology. 



I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Mammalia. — In the exhibition series the gradual elimina- 
tion of old and faded specimens and their replacement by new 
ones, mounted according to modern methods, has been con- 
tinued so far as opportunity and financial considerations have 
permitted. The case for Langur and Guereza Monkeys in the 
Upper Mammalian Gallery, alluded to in last year's report, 
has been completed, with great advantage to the general 
appearance of the Gallery and the display of the specimens. 
The re-arrangement and repainting (green) of the eases con- 
taining the smaller Garni vora in the Lower Mammalian 
Gallery has been completed ; and two of the Uodent cases 
have been similarly treated. A new case for Hares and 
Rabbits has been installed in one of the bays rendered vacant 
by the removal of the Elephants, thereby relieving the con- 
gestion in the other Rodent cases. 

An unsatisfactory portion of the Lower Mammal Gallery 
was the last bay on the north side, partly owing to over- 
crowding and partly to the want of light in that particular 
bay. An improvement has been effected by devoting the 
darkest case entirely to skeletons, and by painting the 
floor of the adjacent central case light green instead of 
brown. As regards the overcrowded condition of the 
other cases, this has been remedied by the removal of the 
Bush-bucks to the West Corridor, where they have been 
temporarily disposed among the existing cases, pending the 
installation of a new one, which is already in order. The 
repainting and re-arrangement of the other cases at the north- 
west end of the Lower Mammal Gallery is still in progress. 
The Antelope case in the West Corridor facing the staircase 
leading to the Upper Mammal Gallery has been painted 
green, with great advantage to the display of the specimens. 

Attention may also be directed to the mounting of the 
almost unique male and female skulls of the Great Assam 
Buffalo {Bo8 bubalis m^acroceros) in a conspicuous position at 
the West end of the Lower Mammal Gallery. 

In the British Saloon much preliminary work has been 
accomplished in regard to the preparation of a series of 
groups of Mammals ; of these a group of Otters has already 
been installed, and one of Water-Rats will shortly be ready 
for exhibition. The large Mammal case has been painted 
green. 

General conservation, rewriting and printing of labels, 
when required owing to the progress of Zoology, have been 
carried on as usual. 

Among the additions, noticed below, special attention may 
be directed to the following, viz., a statuette, modelled by 



114 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Captain Adrian Jones, of H.M. the King's Racehorse " Per- 
simmon," presented by H.R.H. the Prince of Wales ; a 
statuette, also modelled by Capt. A. Jones, of the Racehorse 
" Zinfandel," presented by Lord Howard de Walden, the 
owner ; the skull of " Ormonde " ; a Hippopotamus, presented 
by Rowland Ward, Esq. ; and mounted specimens of the 
Tibetan Takin {Budorcas taxicolor iihetanus) and the White- 
maned Serow Antelope (Nemorhcedus argyrocho&tes). 

The more notable additions to the exhibited series include 
the following : — 

Primates : — Andamanese skeletons ; photographs of 
Pigmies ; photograph of Simla satyrus ; Cercocehus collaris, 
C. alhigena. Carnivora : — Cyon deccanensis, Ganis pam- 
basileus, presented by F. C. Selous, Esq. ; Lutra vulgaris 
(group) ; Halichoirus gryphus, presented by J. G. Millais, 
Esq. tlNGULATA : — Budorcas taxicolor tihetanus, Nemor- 
hcedus argyrochcetes, Ovis fannini, presented by Prince 
Colloredo Mansfeld ; Ovis stonei, presented by D. T. 
Hanbury, Esq. ; Raphicerus sharpei ; Gervus duvauceli ; 
Hippopotamus amphibius. Rodentia : — Pentalagus fur- 
nessi, presented by the Duke of Bedford, K.G. 

Domesticated Animals : — Fox Terrier " Donna For- 
tuna " ; Japanese Spaniel ; Blenheim Spaniel pup : King 
Charles Spaniel ; Collie Dog, " Roy " ; Pointer ; skeleton of 
the Shire Stallion, " Blaisdon Conqueror/' presented by the 
owner, the late P. Stubbs, Esq. ; skeleton of the Shire 
Stallion " Prince William," presented by the owner, Lady 
Wantage ; skull and limb-bones of the Thoroughbred 
Stallion " Ormonde," presented by W. O. B. Macdonough, 
Esq., the owner ; statuette of H.M. the King's Thoroughbred 
Stallion " Persimmon " ; statuette of Lord Howard de Wal- 
den's Thoroughbred Stallion "Zinfandel"; Hunia Fighting 
Ram ; Cameroon Maned Sheep. 

The series of skulls of dogs has been arranged in a new 
case ; and the case to illustrate the origin of the horse and 
the ancestry of its breeds has been installed 

In the study series the work of registering, labelling, and 
incorporating specimens has been continued. Three store 
cabinets have been added for the reception of skins of 
Mammals of about the size of a fox. Many of the skins 
acquired in earlier times have been re-made, where possible, 
thus rendering them fit for comparison with modern material. 

The Department is again indebted for much valuable 
assistance in dealing with its acquisitions to voluntary 
helpers, of whom should be specially mentioned Dr. Forsyth- 
Major, Mr. J. L. Bonhote, Mr. Harold Schwann, and Capt. 
G. E. H. Barrett-Hamilton. 

By the assistance of a private donor the services of 
Dr. Knud Andersen have been continued in working out and 
re-labelling the collection of Chiroptera. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 115 

Aves. — Considerable progress has been made with the re- 
mounting of the British Birds for the pier-cases in the 
Pavilion, and among the series in the General Gallery 
progress has also been made. 

Descriptive printed labels have been placed in all the cases 
containing the nesting series of British Birds, and framed 
tablets showing the classification adopted, have been placed 
at intervals in the Gallery. 

Progress has been made with the Osteological Collection, 
and a large number of eggs of species included in Volume V. 
have been incorporated. 

The arrangement and cataloguing of the skeletons of 
the TTacheophone Pctsseres, Ptevoiotochidoe, Conopophagidoe 
For7)iicariidce, and Dendrocolaptidce have been proceeded 
with. 

The collection of birds in spirits has also been overhauled, 
but cannot be properly arranged until better accommodation 
has been provided. 

A case illustrative of the parasitic habit in birds has been 
installed in the North Hall, near by the one containing eggs 
of the Common Cuckoo. In the same neighbourhood have 
been placed photographs illustrating the manner in which 
young Cuckoos eject the rightful occupants of the nest they 
usurp ; and also a label describing the nesting habits of 
Cuckoos. 

Reptilia and BatracJda. — The Exhibition Cases in the 
Reptile Gallery are all now provisionally arranged, but much 
remains to be done in the matter of filling up gaps. The 
most important work that has been done during the year 
is the painting of the mounted specimens of Monitor and 
other Lizards and Snakes to imitate, so far as possible, their 
colouring during life. This work, which is far from being 
complete, has been done entirely by a member of the staff 
of the Museum. 

The work of renewing the spirit in the bottles has been 
continued. The incorporation of accessions has been pro- 
ceeded with as far as possible. The removal of the Bactrachians 
to the new cases provided has been commenced. 

The numerous additions to the Collection have been named 
and incorporated as soon as received. 

Pisces. — Much progress has been made in the Southern 
half of the Fish Gallery, and it is now re-opened to the 
public. The preparation of the specimens and their re- 
arrangement in the cases are nearly completed, and temporary 
labels have been introduced into six of the ten wall cases. 
The Northern half of the Gallery has been partitioned off, 
since this part will not be ready for the admission of the 
public for some time longer. 

Mollusca. — The interesting collection of Moll usca obtained 
by the " Discovery "' in the Antarctic Region has been worked 
124. I 



116 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

out and reported upon, and the specimens collected by the 
same expedition at the Auckland Islands have been named. 
A collection made in Tierra del Fuego by Captain Richard 
Crawshay has also been worked out and a report published. 
The Mollusca obtained by Mr. W. A. Cunnington in the 
great lakes of Central Africa have been determined and 
described, and a report has been prepared, bringing up to 
date the catalogue of the South African fauna. The working 
out of an important series of deep-sea forms obtained by 
H.M. Indian Marine Survey Steamer " Investigator " has been 
commenced. 

Part of the collection of Rissoidcu has been mounted in 
glass-topped boxes, and the whole of the exhibited series of 
Ghitonidcu has been remounted on new tablets, provided 
with printed labels, and arranged in accordance with Prof. 
Pilsbry's Monograph. The numerous accessions have been 
mounted and incorporated, a suitable selection being placed 
on exhibition in the table-cases. 

Arachnida and Myriopoda. — Among the accessions dealt 
with during the year was the major portion of the Godman 
Collection of Spiders from Central America, numbering nearly 
four thousand specimens. The bottling, labelling and regis- 
tering of this large collection occupied some considerable 
time. As it has not been found possible to incorporate it in 
the general collection, it has been temporarily arranged in a 
cupboard in the Spirit building. The spirit collections of 
Scorpions, Pedipalpi, Solifugse and Mygalomorphous Spiders 
have been completely re-arranged, and a manuscript index to 
the genera has been prepared. The collection of Ixodidce 
consisting mainly of unidentified material, was sent to Prof. 
Neumann, of Toulouse, for study, and has been returned by 
him after determining the species. The collection of Pseudo- 
scorpions is in the hands of Mr. C. J. With, of Copenhagen, 
for study. 

Insecta. — Series of specimens and drawings of moths, 
gnats and midges have been in course of preparation for 
exhibition in the Insect Gallery. 

With a view of showing extremely small objects, a 
specially constructed microscope has been placed in the 
Insect Gallery, exhibiting some minute Hymenoptera, which 
are parasites on the eggs of other insects. Specimens are 
placed in the microscope, and enlarged drawings with an 
explanatory label are placed above it. It has been appreciated 
by numerous visitors and has so far been fairly used. 

A considerable number of Coleoptera of the family 
Nitidulidce, which were sent to M. Grouvelle to be named, 
nave been returned and re-incorporated. The collection of 
Corylo%)hid(E formed by the late Rev. A. Matthews, recently 
acquired, has been incorporated. A fresh arrangement of 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. Il7 

the Passalidce has been completed. The arrangement of the 
Elateridoe has been completed to the end of the Monocre- 
2)idiina3. The Eucne'inidce have been extended to enable 
accessions to be incorporated. Some progress has been 
made in the incorporation of the Kerremans' Collection of 
Buprestidce. 

The collection of Cassididce formed by the late J. S. 
Baly, acquired in the early part of the year, has been 
incorporated. 

The bequest of the large collection of Coleoptera, formed 
by the late Mr. A. Fry, has necessitated considerable exten- 
sion of some parts of the collection. The Cetoniidce have 
been completely re-arranged, advantage being taken to in- 
corporate at the same time accessions from other sources. A 
very large number oi Longicornia have also been incorporated, 
as well as specimens belonging to other families. As the 
cabinets have, in accordance with the bequest, to be emptied 
within twelve months after the receipt of the collection, and 
as it will be impossible to incorporate all the specimens within 
this period, the contents of some of the drawers are being 
transferred as they stand to Museum cabinets. To the end 
of December 1905, 27,500 specimens had been labelled, and 
either incorporated or transferred. 

The preparation of the Catalogue of Orthoptera has been 
proceeded with. The manuscript containing the Oryllidce 
has been completed and sent to press, and the Phasgomiridce 
will soon be finished. 

The arrangement of the How,02)teTa of the family 
CicadidcG has been completed, and the FulgoridcB have been 
begun. 

The Lepidoptera of the family Danainoi have now been 
completely transferred and re-arranged in the new cabinets, 
and the Ithomiance in part similarly treated. Several large 
Nymphaline genera, such as Charaxes and Doleschalia, have 
been re-arranged in the new cabinets, and a portion of the 
Hewitson Pierince incorporated with the general collection. 

The Nymphaline genera, Rathinda and Neptis, have been 
arranged by Colonel Bingham ; and the Pieridce, of the 
genus Golias, the holarctic Pieridce and the genus Parnassius, 
by Mr. H. J. Elwes. 

The fifth volume of the " Catalogue of Lepidoptera 
Phalsense " has been published, and the manuscript of the 
sixth volume, containing the Cucullianw nearly completed. 
The NoctuidoB of the sub-families Eutelianca, Stictopterinoi, 
Sarrothriphince and Acontiance have been arranged, and 
Catocalinoe nearly completed. New species in these families 



118 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

have been described. Part of the Geometridce of the sub- 
family BoarraiancG has been arranged, and the Godman and 
Salvin Collection and other accessions incorporated. 

The arrangement of the collection of British Lepidoptera 
has been continued and will shortly be completed. 

Some progress has been made in the re-arrangement of 
the Diptera of the family Muscidce. Numerous accessions 
from various sources have been incorporated, including a 
considerable number of Mosquitoes (Culicidai) and a series 
of types of species from New Zealand described by Captain 
Hutton. A large number of type specimens of Tachininoe, 
JDexince, and Sarcophaginai, described by F.Walker, have been 
examined with a view to ascertain to what modern genera the 
species should be referred, and they have been labelled and 
transferred to their proper places in the collection. The 
Walkerian types of Evaza, Salduhcc, Trichochceta and allied 
genera {Strationiyidco) have been studied, and assigned to 
their proper systematic positions. 

The determination and re-arrangement of the Tabanidce 
have been continued by Miss Ricardo. 

The British Diptera of the genera Siinulium and 
Varichoeta (Erigone) have been determined, labelled, and 
arranged. 

Considerable time has been occupied in attending to 
correspondence respecting Blood-sucking Flies, and in deter- 
mining specimens sent for that purpose, chiefly by medical 
men from various parts of the world, including India, Indo- 
China, Egypt, Sudan, British Central Africa, and other 
localities. 

Crustacea. — The arrangement of the cases of Crustacea in 
the Insect Gallery has been continued. A considerable num- 
ber of additional specimens have been prepared and coloured, 
completing the systematic series of the Brachyura, and 
descriptive labels have been prepared. The whole of the dry 
collection, with the exception of the Cirripedia, has now been 
arranged in the new cabinets in the Crustacea Room, and 
manuscript indices to the spirit and dry collections have 
been prepared. Work on the Cumacea has been continued, 
and reports on collections from Ireland and from the Dutch 
East Indies have been published. Reports have been pre- 
pared and are now in the press on the collection obtained by 
the "Discovery " Expedition, and on that of the " Puritan" 
Expedition near Naples. The Decapoda of the " Discovery " 
have been studied, and assistance has been given to Mr. A. 0. 
Walker in working out the Amphipoda of the same collection. 
Mr. Stanley W. Kemp has revised the deep-sea prawns of the 
genus Acanihephyra in the Museum Collection. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 119 

Prototracheata* . — The few specimens received during the 
year were submitted to Prof. Bouvier, of whose long promised 
Monograph the first part has been published.t 

EcJiino derma*. — Very interesting specimens of Toxo- 
pneustes variegatus, showing the products of the gonads 
emerging from their orifices, have been mounted in spirit ; a 
fine example of 8trongylocenU'otus franciscanus has been 
mounted in a special case. The new species of Asteroidea 
described since 1893, and the specimens of the class which 
have been added to the collection during the last ten years, 
have been entered in the MSS. Catalogue of that group. 

Vermes*. — The unnamed specimens in the Beddard Col- 
lection (reported last year) were returned to Mr. Beddard, who 
has determined them ; on their return they were re-spirited, 
bottled and registered ; his collection of 1,200 slides, which 
were not in very good order when received late last year, has 
been cleaned, re-arranged, and a type-written list of the genera, 
with their register numbers, has been placed in each slide 
box. The whole Beddard Collection has been entered in an 
interleaved copy of Dr. Michaelson's '■' Oligochseta," which will 
be of great assistance to students. 

Anthozoa* . — A case containing an introductory series of 
Corals and an exhibition of the species found in the British 
Seas has been partly set out ; the recent discovery of several 
forms new to our seas necessitates waiting for examples of 
these to complete the series. Volume V. of the Catalogue of 
Corals, containing an account of the Indo-Pacific species of 
the genus Porites, has been published ; the account of the 
Atlantic species is still in MSS., but a large number of the 
illustrations have been printed. The re-velveting of the 
exhibition cases has been completed, and the specimens 
re-arranged ; a fine example of Venus' Fan {Pterogorgia fla- 
hellum) has been mounted, as well as some very interesting 
examples of Turhinaria, which show the mortal influence of 
deposits of mud on calyciform corals. A fine photograph of 
living Dead Men's Fingers {Alcyonium digitatuvi) has been 
prepared from a photo lent by the Horniman Museum. All 
the label names of the exhibited sea-anemones ai'e now 
protected from dirt by glass covers. Two large cases for 
exhibiting Gorgonellids are being made. 

* The time of the Assistant in charge of these groups has been largely 
devoted to the "Discovery" Collection. 

t The opinion of a fellow-worker from the Jardin des Plai.tes may be 
worth transcribing, M. Bouvier says : — 

" Les collections du Musee britannique, plus riches que toutes autres en 
individus et en especes, et oil se trouvent reuois des materiaux siagulierement 
predeux, depuis I'exemplaire de Sloane (le premier connu du groupo) jusqu'k 
ceux examines ou apportes recemment par MM. Sedgwick, Pocock, VVilley, 
Dendy et Evans.'' 



120 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The cupboards mentioned in last year's report have been 
stocked with all the specimens that have as yet been 
calalogued ; and they can now be consulted or examined 
without any loss of time to the student. 

Polyzoa, Porifera, Protozoa. — The working out of the 
large collection of Sponges brought home by the " Discovery " 
from the Antarctic has been commenced. The Report on the 
Hexactinellida (with 7 quarto plates) has been completed, 
and that on the Tetractinellida (with 4 quarto plates) is now 
nearly ready; also numerous preparations of the Monaxonida 
have been made. 

The spirit collection of Sponges has been removed from the 
high cupboards in which it was stored, and arranged in low 
cupboards in the Spirit building, the position of the genera on 
the shelves being indicated on label cards. 

The large collection of material, including MS. notes and 
drawings, constituting a final instalmen t of the Busk Coll ection, 
has been arranged so as to be available for reference, and has 
been found of much use by students working at the collection 
of Polyzoa. 

The micro-slide preparations of Protozoa (mostly Fora- 
minifera), Sponges, and Hydrozoa, contained in 216 boxes, 
and numbering over 11,000, have been put in order. 

A collection, comprising 15 specimens of Freshwater- 
Sponges from Lakes Victoria, Tanganyika, and Nyassa, 
collected by Mr. Cunnington, has been worked out, and is in 
course of being reported upon. 

At the request of the India Office, a short report has been 
drawn up on the Persian Gulf as a possible area for successful 
Sponge Fisheries. 

The exhibit in the case containing a series of specimens 
and diagrams, illustrative of the structure of Sponges, was 
damaged by rain coming in through the roof. Considerable 
time was involved in repairing the damage done to these 
exhibits. 

II. — Du2')licates and Exchanges. 

Duplicates have been presented to the Technical Educa- 
tion Board of the London County Council ; St. Paul's 
School Field Club Museum, Hammersmith ; the Wimbledon 
Technical Institute ; the Sir John Cass Technical Institute; 
Eton College; the Campden School of Arts and Crafts, 
Chipping Campden, Gloucestershire; M. H. d'Orbigny ; 
Herr R. Piingeler ; Dr. William Barnes ; Prof. Y. Sjostedt ; 
and M. A. Regimbart. 

Exchanges have been effected with Mr. J. H. Fleming, 
Dr. Moreno, Mr. William Cross, and the Bromley Natural 
History Society ; Prof. Joseph Gillett, Mr. I. T. Kaye, Mr. 
F. N. Nunenmacher, Prof. Y. Sjostedt, M. Rene Oberthiir, Com- 
mander J. J. Walker, R.N., Prof. Hauser, Dr. A. H. Heath, 
Dr. M. Cameron, Dr. M. A. Regimbart, Mr. Malcolm Burr. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 121 

A Polar Bear has been sent, through Mr. W. Foster, to the 
Agricultural College of Asuncion, Paraguay, in exchange for 
a number of small mammals. 

III. — Departmental Library. 

One hundred and eighty-seven separate works in 362 
volumes, nev7 to the Library, and 1945 parts of periodicals 
and works in progress have been acquired during the year by 
purchase, presentation, and exchange. Some of these formed 
part of the Library of the late Alexander Fry, and were 
received from his executors, together with his collection of 
Insects. Altogether, 154 works, represented by 611 volumes, 
and 686 parts and extracts, were comprised in the Fry 
bequest. Three hundred and eight books have been bound. 
The Library now contains 10,910 separate works in 17,062 
volumes. A collection of 278 folios of water-colour drawings 
of Japanese Fishes has been presented by Mrs. Stoddart, and 
four volumes of pencil drawings of Fishes of the Rio Negro 
have been presented by Dr. Alfred Russel Wallace. They 
were made by him during his travels in South America 
about 50 years ago. The former collection was made by 
Mr. Stoddart during his residence in Nagasaki. The drawings 
were prepared by Japanese artists, and are of interest 
as representing the fish-fauna of that part of Japan, and 
being coloured from living or freshly caught specimens, they 
will prove a valuable aid to ichthyologists who may engage 
in the study of the Japanese fish-fauna. 

Some of Dr. Wallace's drawings represent species as yet 
undescribed, and serve to show the incompleteness of our 
knowledge of the fishes of the Amazon and its tributaries. 
This interesting series has been named, as far as possible, 
by Mr. C. T. Regan. 

IV. — Publications. 

In addition to the Catalogues and other works published 
by the Trustees, already mentioned, the following reports or 
descriptive papers, based on specimens in the Collection, have 
been prepared and published in scientific journals : — 

Mammalia. — " On Mammals and Birds from Japan " ; 
"On a new Golden Mole from Cape Colony" ; "A new 
Cricetulus from Mongolia " ; " The Nomenclature of the 
Cranial Measurements " ; " On Mammals from the Island of 
Fernando Po " ; " On a New Bush-Buck from British East 
Africa" ; " On some Australasian Mammals" ; " Anew Genus 
and two new Species of Bats " ; '' On a new Gazelle from 
Palestine " ; " On Hylochcerus, the Forest Pig cf Central 
Africa " ; " On some new Japanese Mammals " ;" On now Neo- 
tropical Molossus, ConeiJatus, &c. " ; '' On a remarkable new 
Squirrel from Burma " ; " New Ground- Squirrels of the Xerus 
erythropus Group " ; " New African Mammals of the Genera 



122 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Glauconycteris, Lutra, Funisciurus, Arvicanthis, &c. ; by 
Oldfield Thomas ; " List of the Mammals obtained in Zululand 
during the Rudd Exploration of South Africa " ; " List of the 
Mammals obtained from the Wakkerstroom District, South- 
Eastern Transvaal, during the Rudd Exploration of South 
Africa," by Oldfield Thomas and Harold Schwann ; " On a 
Second collection of Mammals obtained by Dr. W. J. Ansorge 
in Angola," by Oldfield Thomas and R. C. Wroughton. 

" Notes on the various Forms of Arvicanthis pumilio " ; 
" ' The ' Common Striped Palm-Squirrel," by R. C. Wroughton. 
"On a new Vole from Kashmir" ; " On the Mouse-Hares 
of the Genus Ochotona," by J. Lewis Bonhote. " On the Bats 
of the Rhinoloph'iis arcuatus Group, with Descriptions of 
Five New Forms"; "On some Bats of the Genus Rhino- 
lophus, and Descriptions of twenty-six New Forms " ; " On 
Hipposiderus cHadema and its closest Allies '' ; "A List 
of the Species and Sub-species of the Genus Rhinolophus, 
with some Notes on their Geographical Distribution," by 
Knud Anderson. 

"The Bonin Lsland Sambar"; "On Dolphins from 
Travancore "; " On the Nigerian and Kilimanjaro Girafi*es " ; 
"The Gorals of India and Burma"; "An undescribed 
Guereza " ; " Local Variation in the Giraffe," by R. Lydekker. 
" Notes on the Mammals of Southern Cameroons and the 
Benito," by George L. Bates. 

Aves. — " On further collections of Birds from the Efulen 
District of Cameroon?, West Africa (Part III.) ; " Notes on 
Mr. Robin Kemp's paper on the " Birds of the South-Eastern 
part of the Protectorate of Sierra Leone," by R. Bowdler 
Sharpe. 

" On the Birds collected by the late W. G. Doggett on the 
Anglo-German frontier of Uganda " ; " On the display of the 
Lesser Bird- of -Paradise " ; " On the Birds procured by the Earl 
of Ranfurley in New Zealand and the adjacent Islands " ; " On 
the Birds of the Azores ; "Fasciculi Malayensis; Report on 
the Birds " ; " On a new species of Tree-Partridge from the 
Mountains of the Malay Peninsula " ; " On a new sub-species 
of Scimitar-Babbler"; "On a new species of Whistling- 
Thrush " ; " On two Fly-catchers of the genus Pseudo- 
gerygone " ; " On the species of the genus Acanthidositta " ; 
" On a new Shrike from S. Arabia " ; " On a new species of 
Weka Rail." " On fi.ve new species of birds, procured by 
Mr. Walter Goodfellow in South-East Mindanao," by W. R. 
OgiJvie-Grant. 

"On the systematic position of Zeledonia coronata" ; 
" On the Pterylography and Dermal Myology of the Lesser 
Bird-of-Paradise " ; " Some points in the Anatomy of Acanthi- 
dositta chloris " ; " Contribution to the Osteology of Birds 
(Part VII.), EurylcemidcG," by W. P. Pycraft. 

Reptilia and Batrachia. — "A contribution to our know- 
ledge of the varieties of the Wall-Lizard {Lacerta muralis) in 
Western Europe and North Africa " ; " On a new variety of 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 123 

theWall-Lizard" ; "An Account of the Reptiles and Batrachians 
collected by Mr. F. G. Riggenbacli in the Atlas of Morocco " , 
" On the Lacerta depressa of Camerano " ; " Description of a 
new Newt from Yunnan " ; " Descriptions of new Reptiles 
discovered in Mexico by Dr. H. Gadow " ; " On a Collection of 
Batrachians and Reptiles made in South Africa by Mr. C. H. B. 
Grant, and presented to the British Museum by Mr. C D. 
Rudd " ; " On some Batrachians and Reptiles from Tibet " ; 
" Description of a new Snake from Venezuela " ; " Description 
of a new Batrachian of the genus Bomhinator from Yunnan " ; 
" Descriptions of new West African Frogs of the genera 
Petropedetes and Bulua " ; " Description of a new Snake of the 
genus Atractaspis from Mount Kenya " ; " Descriptions of new 
Snakes in the Collection of the British Museum" ; ''Descrip- 
tions of three new Snakes discovered in South Arabia by Mr, 
G. W. Bury " ; " A list of Batrathians and Reptiles collected 
by Dr. W. J. Ansorge in Angola, with Descriptions of new 
species " ; " Descriptions of new Tailless Batrachians in the 
Collection of the British Museum"; " On remarkable Specimens 
of Rana esculenta from South-Western Persia"; "On the 
habitat of Rana hlanfordii " ; " Description of a new Ixalus 
from Selangor," by G. A. Boulenger. 

Pisces. — " The Distribution of African Fresh-water Fishes 
(Presidential Address to Zoological Section, British Association, 
S.Africa)"; "A list of the Fresh-water Fishes of Africa"; 
" On a second Collection of Fishes made by Mr. S. L. Hinde in 
the Kenya district " ; " On Fishes from Lake Chad " ; Descrip- 
tions of four new Fresh-water Fishes discovered by Dr. W. J. 
Ansorge in Angola"; "On a British specimen of the Great 
Sea-Perch E^nnephelus cernioides " ; " Description of a new 
Mormyrid Fish from the White Nile " ; " Description of a 
new Fish from the Zambesi " ; " Another new Barhus from 
Morocco " ; " On a small collection of Fishes from the Kassai 
River (Congo) ; " On a Collection of Fishes from Lake Bang- 
welu," by 0. A. Boulenger. 

" On a Collection of Fishes made by Dr. H. Gadow in 
Southern Mexico"; "Descriptions of two new Cyprinid 
Fishes from Tibet " ; " Note on Hexanchus cjriseus " ; "A 
Collection of Fishes made by Mr, R. Gordon Smith in the 
Inland Sea of Japan " ; " Descriptions of three new Fishes 
from Japan, collected by Mr. R. Gordon Smith" ; " The 
systematic Arrangement of the Fishes of the genus Arges" ; 
"Descriptions of five new Cyprinid Fishes from Lhasa, 
Tibet, collected by Captain H. J. Walton, I.M.S. " ; "A 
Synopsis of the species of the Silurid genera Parexo stoma, 
Chimarrhichthys, and Exostoma" ; " Description of a new 
Fish of the genus Dentex, from the Coast of Angola"; 
" On Fishes from the Persian Gulf, the Sea of Oman, and 
Karachi, collected by Mr. F. W. Townsend"; "Description 
of a new Loricariid Fish of the genus Xenocara from 
Venezuela": " On Drawings of Fishes of the Rio Negro " : 



124 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

" Description of Acara suhocularis, Cope" ; " A Ee vision of 
the Fishes of the American Cichlid genus Cichlosoma, and of 
the allied genera " ; "A Revision of the Fishes of the South- 
American Cichlid genera Acara, Nannacara, Acaropsis, and 
Astronotus " ; "A Revision of the Fishes of the South- 
America Cichlid genera Crenacara, Batrachops and Creni- 
cichla,''' by C. Tate Regan. 

MoUusca. — '' Description of new species of Vitrea from 
Greece " ; " On a small collection of Mollusca from Tierra 
del Fuego " ; " Descriptions of three new species of Opis- 
thostoma from Sarawak, North Borneo " ; " Description of 
a new species of Op>isthost07na from North Borneo " ; "A 
correction in nomenclature " ; " Descriptions of new species 
of Land-shells from British New Guinea, and remarks on 
two species from the Solom^ Islands " ; " Description of a 
new Land-shell from Christmas Island," by E. A. Smith, 

Insecta. — " Three new Goleoptera from E. Africa belong- 
ing to the Lucanidce and Cetoniidce " ; " Observations on 
Goleoptera of the family Buprestidoi, with descriptions 
of new species " ; " Notes on British Culieidw,'' by C. 0. 
Waterhouse. 

" On some Oriental Aphodiid Goleoptera of the Rhypatrus 
Group, with description of a new Genus," by Gilbert J. 
Arrow. 

"List of a collection of Neuroptera Oclonata (Dragon- 
flies), formed by G. A. K. Marshall, Esq., at Salisbury, 
Mashonaland, with descriptions of a new genus and two new 
species"; " List of a small collection of Odonata (Dragon- 
flies) from Ceylon, collected by Mr. E. Ernest Green, with 
Notes on the genus Zygonidia and its allies, and descriptions 
of new species of Zygonidia (Kirby) and Onychothemis 
(Brauer), from Ceylon and Tonkin " ; " Description of a 
new species of Paloplius [Phasmidoi) from West Africa," 
by W. F. Kirby. 

" Two additional British species of the Dipterous Genus 
Erigone (Rob-Desv.)" ; " A Dipterous Enemy of English Hot- 
house Grapes"; "Anew sub-species of Glossina palpalis 
(Rob-Desv.), the Disseminator of Sleeping Sickness ; " "A 
Provisional List of Diptera, &c., forwarded from Uganda by 
Lieut. -Colonel Bruce during the Investigations of the Sleeping 
Sickness Commission " ; " The Distribution of the Tsetse- 
Flies (genus Glossina, Wiedemann) as at present known, 
with Map," by E. E. Austen. 

" The Moths of S. Africa, Part III." ; '' The Moths of India. 
Supplementary paper to the volumes in 'The Fauna of 
British India,' Parts 1-3 " ; " Descriptions of new Genera 
and Species of Syntoviidce, Arctiadoe, Agaristidce, and 
Noctuidce " ; " Descriptions of New Noctuidoi in the 
British Museum," Parts 1-3, by Sir G. Hampson. 

" Rhynchotal Notes. — xxxix.-xxxvii., by W. L. Distant. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 



125 



" Report on the Aculeate Hymenoptera, collected by N. 
Annanclale and H. C. Robinson in Perak, fee," by Lieut.-Col. 
C. T. Bingham. 

Crustacea. — " Note on a genus of Euphausid Crustacea " ; 
" Cumacea of the West Coast of Ireland " ; " Cumacea of the 
Siboga Expedition "; " On a new species of River- Crab from 
Yunnan," by W. T. Caiman. 

In addition to these, papers based wholly or in part on 
material in the Museum Collection have been published during 
the year by E. W. L. Holt, Esq., W. M. Tattersall, b.sc, Dr. H. 
J. Hansen, and Canon A. M. Norman, f.r.s. 

Prototracheata. — Part I. of Prof. Bouvier's " Monographic 
des Onychophores " has been published in Ann. Sci. nat. 
Zool. ii. (1905), and is to be continued shortly : in the prepar- 
ation of this memoir the author has had the advantage of 
studying the fine collection made by the Museum during the 
last thirty years. 



Investigations in S. Africa. 
(Asteroids, Ophiuroids, and 



Echinoderma. — " Marine 
Echinoderma, parts ii.-iv. 
Crinoids)", by F. Jeffrey Bell. 

The following was based on material supplied for the 
Museum : " Some observations on the development of an 
Asterid with large yolky eggs from the Franklin Islands," 
by E. H. Henderson. 



V. — A cquisitions. 



— 


Donations. 


Purchases. 


Exchanges. 


Total. 


Ma.nmalia {S'^J.^stioated " ■ '■ 


1,439 


1,343 


20 


2,802 


24 


3 


— 


27 


Aves .... 


9,722 


4,021 


91 


13,834 


Eeptilia . - . - 


589 


507 


114 


1,210 


Batrachia - - - - 


256 


141 


9 


406 


Places 


749 


1,866 


1,067 


3,182 


MoUusca .... 


1,550 


1,078 





2,628 


. , . , ( Godman Collection - 


3.811 
140 


1,011 


— 


1 4,962 


Myriopoda - - - - 


79 


177 


— 


^ 256 


I Fry Cullectiou 
T , j Godman Collection - 
I^s^^t'-^l Sharp Collection - 

.Other sources 


150,000 


— 





[ 214,370 
1 


14,42(3 


22,000 


— 


22,479 


4,192 


1,273 


) 


Crustacea - - - . 


1,270 


108 





1,378 


Prototracheata - 


— 


10 





10 


Bchinnderma 


265 


15 


5 


285 


"Vermes - - . . 


39 


406 


2 


447 


Brachipoda - • - 


11 


2 




1 13 


Anthozoa - - - - 


28 


65 





! 93 


Tunicata ... 


19 


_^ 





19 


Polyzoa . . , - 


53 


— 





53 


Hydrozoa - ... 


26 


— 


— 


26 


Porifera . . . - 


70 


8 





78 


Protozoa - - . . 


9 


- 


- 


9 


Totals - 


207,054 


36,453 


2,581 

1 


1 246,088 



126 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Mammalia. — The accessions number two thousand and 
twenty-nine. 

Those most worthy of note are the following : — 

Eight hundred small mammals, mostly bats, from the 
collection of the late Mr. R. F. Tomes, and including about 
40 types of species described by himself and other naturalists ; 
purchased. 

Four Mammals from the Orkney Islands, two seals from 
the Shetlands, and the type of Mus rattus ater, a London 
specimen ; presented by J. G. Millais, Esq. 

Sixteen Mammals from Haute-Savoie ; presented by M. 
A. Robert. 

Forty-three Mammals from Haute-Savoie ; presented by 
Oldfield Thomas, Esq. 

One hundred and forty Mammals from Japan, including 
the type of Petaurista leucogenys nikkonis ; presented by 
R. Gordon Smith, Esq. 

Thirteen Mammals from Kashmir, including the type of 
Microtus imitator ; presented by Col. A. E. Ward. 

Ten Mammals from N.E. Mongolia, including the type of 
Cricetulus caonphelli ; presented by C. W. Campbell, Esq., 
C.M.G. 

Twenty-four Mammals from Sarawak ; presented by 
H. C. Robinson, Esq. 

Thirty-three Mammals from Japan, the Philippines and 
Loo Choo Islands, including the type of Mustela m.elam.pus 
bedfordi, being the first results of the important exploration 
of Eastern Asia now being conducted by Mr. M. P. Anderson ; 
presented by the Duke of Bedford, K.G. 

Three Mammals from Tibet : presented by Lieut.-Col. 
L. A. V/addell. 

Eleven Mammals from Tibet, including the types of 
Cricetulus lama and Microtus waltoni, collected by Capt. 
H. J. Walton, i.M.s. ; presented by the Tibet Frontier 
Commission. 

Fifty-eight Mammals from Thian Shan ; presented by 
A. B. Bayley Worthington, Esq. 

Thirteen Mammals from Fokien, China ; presented by 
J. de La Touche, Esq. 

Sixty-eight Mammals from Persia, including the types of 
Galomyscus hailwardi, I^ipistrellus aladdin and Ellohius 
woosnami, collected by R. B. Woosnam, Esq. ; presented by 
Col. A. C. Bailward. 

Eighty-three Mammals from the Malay Peninsula, in- 
cluding the type of Mus klossi ; presented by C. Boden 
Kloss, Esq. 

Four Mammals from Angola and two from the Gaboon 
and Cameroons ; presented by the Hon. W. Rothschild, m.p. 

Twenty-one Mammals from N. Kyasa Land ; presented 
by Sir Alfred Sharpe. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 127 

Three skeletons of natives of the Andaman islands ; 
purchased. 

Thirty-two Mammals from Berbera, Somaliland; presented 
by R. E. Drake-Brockman, Esq. 

Two hundred and sixty Mammals from N.E. Transvaal, 
Zululand and Natal, including the types of Amhlysomus 
corrice, Miniopterus f rater cuius, Georychus talpoides and 
Raphicerus sharpei colonicus, collected by Mr. C. H. B. 
Grant ; presented by C. D. Eludd, Esq. 

Forty Mammals from Uganda, collected during the 
delimitation of the Anglo-German Boundary ; presented by 
Col. C. Delme RadclifFe. 

Four skulls from Liberia ; presented by Sir Harry 
Johnston, k.c.b. 

Fourteen Mammals from Natal; presented by C. W. 
Turner, Esq. 

Eighty-three Mammals from Angola, collected by Dr. 
Ansorge, including the types of Herpestes gracilis hocagei 
and Georychus ansorgei ; purchased. 

Sixteen Mammals from N. Nigeria; presented by Dr. 
H. K. D. Kumm. 

Twenty-seven Mammals from the Cameroons ; purchased. 

A fine mounted Hippopotamus from the Zambesi ; pre- 
sented by Rowland Ward, Esq. 

Seventeen Mammals from British East Africa ; presented 
by Mrs. S. L. Hinde. 

Six Mammals from the Bahr-el-Ghazal ; presented by 
Major H. Bray, r.a.m.c. 

The head of an African Elephant ; presented by H. S. H. 
Cavendish, Esq. 

Two Mammals from N.E. Rhodesia, both types (Georychus 
mellandi and Heliophohius rohustus) ; presented by F. H. 
Melland, Esq. 

Four Mammals from N. Australia and eight from S.E. 
Australia, including the type of Petrogale hacketti ; presented 
by the Perth Museum, through Dr. B. H. Woodward. 

Seven Mammals from S. Australia, including the type of 
Fhascogale hillieri ; presented by H. J. Hillier, Esq. 

A mounted seal from California ; presented by the Hon. 
W. Rothschild, M.P. 

Eight Mammals from Para, including the type of Pro- 
echimys goeldii, and two other typical specimens ; presented 
by Dr! Goeldi. 

Five Mammals from Tierra del Fuego ; presented by Capt. 
R. Crawshay. 

Thirteen Mammals from Cayenne, including the type of 
Molossus harnesi, presented by W. Barnes, Esq. 

Eight Mammals from Paraguay ; received in exchange. 



128 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Five Mammals from Santiago ; presented by J. A. Wolff- 
sohn, Esq. 

Six Mammals from Venezeula, collected by Sr. S. Briceno, 
and seven from Chiriqui, collected by Mr. H. J. Watson ; 
presented by Oldfield Thomas, Esq. 

Aves. — The accessions totalled thirteen thousand eight 
hundred and thirty four, of which the following deserve 
special notice : — 

One hundred and nine Birds from the West Indies ; pre- 
sented by D. A. Bannerman, Esq. 

One hundred and sixty-two Birds from British Central 
Africa ; presented by Sir Alfred Sharpe, k.c.b. 

Fifty-two Birds from South-West Australia, including five 
species new to the collection ; presented by Dr. Bernard 
Woodward. 

Forty Birds from the Azores ; presented by the Ponta 
Delgada Museum. 

Seven hundred and forty-five Birds from Dr. Sclater's 
Collection ; purchased. 

Forty-five Birds from the Belgian Congo ; presented by 
Colonel J. J. Harrison. 

Ninety-eight eggs fiom Australia ; presented A. J. North, 
Esq. 

Sixty-four Birds from Wales and Ireland ; presented by 
W. E,. Ogilvie-Grant, Esq. 

One thousand, two hundred and seventy-nine Birds and 
eight hundred and sixty-eight eggs, from Egypt, &c. ; 
bequeathed by the late Mr. Edward Cavendish Taylor. 

Three hundred and twenty-two Birds from Japan ; pre- 
sented by His Grace the Duke of Bedford, k.g. 

Three hundred and thirty-five Birds from the Kauri 
Kachin district, and one thousand two hundred and sixty 
Birds from Mount Victoria, Chin Hills ; presented by Lieut.- 
Colonel Rippon. 

Seventy-two Birds from Tian Shan Mountains ; presented 
by A. B, Bayley Worthington, Esq. 

Four hundred and seventeen eggs from British East 
Africa and Uganda ; purchased. 

Two hundred and eight Birds from the Chindwin Hills ; 
presented by Capt. A. Mears. 

Eighty-eight Birds from the Syrian Desert, collected by 
Mr. D. Carruthers ; purchased. 

Nine hundred and six Birds and seven hundred and forty- 
five eggs from Paraguay, collected by W. Foster ; purchased. 

Nine hundred and fifty-four mounted Birds from various 
localities; presented by Lord Tweedmouth. 

Four hundred and sixteen Birds from S. Tibet ; presented 
by Capt. H. J. Walton, I.M.S. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 129 

Two hundred and thirty-two Birds from Benguela, 
collected by Dr. W. J. Ansorge ; purchased. 

Two hundred and thirty-six Birds from Apo Volcano, 
Mindanao, Philippines, including the types of seven new species 
and nineteen species new to the collection, collected by 
Mr. W. Goodfellow ; purchased. 

Four hundred and fifty Birds from the Wagga Moun- 
tains, Somali Land, collected by Mr. G. W. Bury: purchased. 

Four hundred and fifty Birds, mostly from the Canary 
Islands ; presented by E. G. B. Meade Waldo. 

Three hundred and seventy-four Birds from S.W. 
Australia, collected by T. Shortridge ; presented by W. E. 
Balston, Esq. 

Three hundred and ninety- six Birds from Persia, collected 
by R. B. Woosnam ; presented by Col. Bailward. 

Three hundred and twenty-six Birds from Cameroons, 
West Africa, collected by Mr. G. L. Bates ; purchased. 

Eighteen Silver Pheasants from Upper Burma ; received 
in exchange from the Bombay Natural History Society. 

Reptilia. — The accessions number one thousand two 
hundred and ten, five hundred and eighty-nine by presenta- 
tion, five hundred and seven by purchase, and one hundred 
and fourteen received in exchange. The most important 
are : — 

Thirty-three examples of the Wall-Lizard (Lacerta 
muralis) representing several varieties from Spain ; received 
from the Madrid Museum. 

One of the types of Lacerta muralis, var. hreviceps, from 
Italy ; presented by Prof. Monticelli. 

A melanistic variety of the Wall-Lizard {Lacerta muralis) 
from near Florence ; presented by Dr. A. Banchi. 

Twenty specimens from Styria ; received from Herr G. 
Marktanner-Turneretscher, 

Thirty-five specimens from Roumania ; purchased. 

Forty-five specimens from Morocco, including examples 
of a Lizard new to the collection (Qymnodactylus trachy- 
hlepharus), collected by Herr F. W. Riggenbach ; purchased. 

Forty-one specimens from Angola, including the type 
of a new Snake {Psa'tnTnophis ansorgii), and specimens of 
two Snakes new to the collection {Ap)arallactus hocagii), 
collected by Dr. W. J. Ansorge; purchased. 

A rare Lizard {Rhoptropus afer) from Angola ; presented 
by R. J. Cuninghame, Esq. 

A rare Lizard {Psilodactylus caudicinct as) from Nigeria; 
presented by A. L. de M. Mynn, Esq. 



130 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

One -hundred specimens from S. Africa, collected by 
C. Grant; presented by C. D. Rudd, Esq. 

Two hundred and one specimens from Somaliland, 
collected by G. W. Bury, Esq. ; purchased. 

Forty-nine specimens from Persia, collected by R. B. 
Woosnam, Esq. ; presented by Col. Bailward. 

Twelve Lizards of the genus Phrynocephalu'i from 
Central Asia, including type specimens of three species new 
to the collection (P. alpherakii, zalenshii and acufirostris ) ; 
received from the St. Petersburg Museum. 

Eleven specimens from Tibet, including the types of a 
new Lizard {Also])hylax tihetanus) ; presented by Lieut.-Col. 
L. A. Waddal, c.b. 

Fortj^'-four specimens from Yunnan, including examples 
of a new Snake and a new Tortoise, collected by Mr. J. 
Graham ; purchased. 

Four specimens from the Himalayas, including the type 
of a new Snake {Lycodon mackinnoni) ; presented by 
Captain F. Wall. 

One hundred and seven specimens from Ceylon ; presented 
by E. E. Green, Esq. 

Thirteen specimens from the Malay Peninsula , including 
the types of a new Snake {Calamaria gimletti), collected by 
Dr. J. D. Gimlefcte ; presented by the Imperial Institute. 

Twenty-nine specimens from Japan, collected by Mr. M. P. 
Anderson ; presented by His Grace the Duke of Bedford. 

Twenty-three specimens from Dutch New Guinea, 
collected by A. E. Pratt, Esq. ; purchased. 

Forty-five specimens from near Lake Eyre, South 
Australia, including examples of two new species; presented 
by H. J. Hillier, Esq. 

A Caiman, one of the types of Caiman sclerous var. 
chiapasius, from Tetuantepec, received in exchange from the 
Paris Museum. 

Ten specimens from Costa Rica, including the type 
of a new Snake {Phrydo2:)s melas), collected by Mr. C. H. 
Lankester ; purchased. 

Thirteen specimens from Panama ; presented by H. 
Roberts, Esq. 

Fifteen specimens, including examples of a species new to 
the collection {Leposoma scincoides) from British Guiana; 
presented by Dr. C. Bovallius. 

Forty-seven specimens from the Andes of Venezuela, 
including the types of two new Snakes {Atr actus ventri- 
7}iaculatu8 and Leptognathus latifrontalis), collected by 
Sr. Briceno ; purchased. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 131 

Eleven specimens from Peru ; presented by M. Eugene 
Robuchon. 

Sixteen specimens from Peru, collected by Mr. Ockenden ; 
purchased. 

Batrachia. — The accessions number four hundred and 
six, two hundred and fifty-six by presentation, one hundred 
and forty-one by purchase, and nine received in exchange. 

The most important are : — 

Nine specimens from Sierra Leone, including the types of 
a new Frog {Petropfidetes natator); presented by Major F. 
Smith, R.A.M.c. 

Fifteen specimens from Angola, including the type of a 
new Frog {Rana ansorgii), collected by Dr. W. J. Ansorge ; 
purchased. 

Sixty-four specimens from South Africa, collected by 
C. Grant ; presented by C D. Rudd, Esq. 

Thirty-two specimens from Yunnan, including the types 
of a new Toad (Bomhinator maxvmus) and a new Newt 
(Molge ivolterstorffi), collected by Mr. J. Graham; purchased. 

Thirty-one specimens from Ceylon ; presented by E. E. 
Green, Esq. 

Seven specimens from Selangor, including the types of a 
new Frog (Jtxalus castanomerus) ; received in exchange from 
the Selangor Museum. 

Nineteen specimens from Japan, collected by Mr. M. P. 
Anderson ; presented by His Grace the Duke of Bedford. 

The type of a new Tree-Frog {Hyla graminea) from 
British New Guinea ; purchased. 

Twenty-seven specimens from British Guiana ; presented 
by Dr. C. Bovallius. 

Thirty-five specimens from the Andes of Venezeula, 
collected by Sr. Briceiio ; purchased. 

Pisces. — The accessions number three thousand one 
hundred and eighty-two, seven hundred and forty-nine b}' 
presentation, one thousand three hundred and sixty-six by 
purchase, and one thousand and sixty-seven received in 
exchange. The most important are : — 

Eighteen prepared skulls of Malacopterygian Fishes ; 
presented by Dr. W. G. Kidewood. 

A large Sea-Perch {Epincphelus cernioides) from Corn- 
wall, new to the collection and to the British Fauna ; 
presented by Harrod's Stores, Ltd. 

A Vendace from Derwentwater, the type of a new British 
species {Coregonus gracilior), received in exchange from the 
Keswick Museum. 

A large Schelly {Coregonus clupeoides) from Haweswater ; 
presented by the Earl of Lonsdale. 

A very large Gwyniad {Coregonus clupeoides) from Bala 
Lake ; presented by W. Owen, Esq. 

Two Powan (Coregonus clupeoides) from Loch Lomond ; 
presented by W. L. Calderwood, Esq^. 

1^4. K 



132 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Four Charr {Salmo willughhii) from Crummock Water ; 
presented by W. H. Marshall, Esq. 

Three Burbot {Lota vulgaris) from Norfolk; presented 
by W. E. Sowels, Esq. 

Fifty-three specimens from deep water off the Irish Coast ; 
presented by the Department of Agriculture and Technical 
Instruction for Ireland. 

Six Salmon, Trout and Charr from Ireland ; presented by 
W. McOran Campbell, Esq. 

Twenty Cyprinid Fishes from Morocco, including the 
types of a new species {Barhus hsihi), collected by Herr 
Riggenbach ; purchased. 

Twenty-nine specimens from Lake Chad ; presented by 
Captain Gosling. 

Type specimens of Paratilapia prognatha and Neohola 
argentea, from Kavirondo Bay ; received from the Paris 
Museum. 

Seventeen specimens from the Coast of Angola, including 
the types of a new species {Dentex ciininghatnii), and 
examples of two species new to the collection {Dentex moroc- 
canus and Diagramma mediterraneum) ; presented by 
R. J. Cunninghame, Esq. 

Ten specimens from Angola, including the types of four 
new species {Mastacemhelus ansorgii, Marcusenius ansorgii, 
GnatJionemus angolensis and Alestes Jmmilis), collected by 
Dr. W. J. Ansorge ; purchased. 

Twenty-one specimens from the West Coast of Africa ; 
presented by the Hon. Walter Rothschild, m.p. 

Fifty-two specimens from South Africa, including Cat- 
Fish {Clarias theodorai), new to the collection, collected by 
C, Grant ; presented by C. D. Riidd, Esq. 

Nine specimens from South Africa, type of new species 
described by the donor ; presented by Dr. J. D. F. Gilchrist. 

Fifty-one specimens from the Coast of Natal, including 
the types of five new species (Pliotrevia warreni, Raia 
ooellifera, R. rhizacanthus, Scovpcmia natalensis, and 
Clwpea durhanensis) ; presented by Dr. E. Warren. 

Twenty-eight specimens from Lake Bangwelu, including 
the types of several new species ; collected by F. H. Melland, 
Esq., and the Rev. Father Foulon ; presented by F. H. 
Melland, Esq. 

Ninety-five specimens from the Kilimandjaro District, 
including types of several new species, collected by Herr 
Oscar Neumann ; purchased. 

Fifty -five specimens from the Nile ; presented by Captain 
S. S. Flower. 

Seventy-six specimens from the Baro River, collected by 
Mr, Zaphiro ; presented by W. N. McMillan, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 133 

Six specimens of the genera Oottus and Gottocomephorus 
from Lake Baikal, including examples of two species new 
to the collection {Oottus herzensteini and C. goclleiusJdi) ; 
received in exchange from the St. Petersburg Museum. 

Eight specimens from Seistan, including the types of two 
new Cyprinids (Scaj^hiodon macniahoni and Nemachilus 
rhadineus) ; collected by Colonel Sir Henry McMahon ; 
presented by the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

The types of a new Cyprinid Fish {Gymnocypris 
waddellii) from Tibet ; presented by Lieut.-Col. L. A. Waddell, 

C.B. 

Twenty-five specimens from Yunnan, including the types 
of two new Cyprinids {Nemachilus grahami and Cyprinus 
micristius), collected by Mr. J. Graham ; purchased. 

Twenty specimens, co-types of species described by 
Dr. Duncker, from the Malay Peninsula ; presented by the 
Selangor State Museum. 

Thirteen specimens from Borneo ; presented by the 
Curator of the Sarawak Museum. 

Six hundred and four specimens from the Inland Sea of 
Japan, including the types of several new species, collected 
by R. Gordon-Smith, Esq. ; purchased. 

Twenty-three specimens from Japan, including several 
rare Selachians ; purchased. 

Five hundred and forty-nine specimens from Japan, 
including examples of several species new to the collection ; 
purchased of Dr. D. S. Jordan. 

Eighteen specimens from New Guinea ; presented by 
Major W. C. Daniels. 

The types of two new Fishes from New Guinea (Neosilurus 
bartoni and Rho'tnbatractus melanotcenia) ; presented by 
His Excellency Governor F. R. Barton. 

Six specimens, including the type of a new species {Eleotris 
moncktoni) from New Guinea ; presented by C. A. W. 
Monckton, Esq. 

Forty-four specimens of the genus Galaxias from Aus- 
tralia, including the types of G. longi and 0. occidentalis and 
of two new species {G. ivaitii and G. dissimilis), received in 
exchange from the Australian Museum. 

Fifty-two specimens from New Zealand, including the 
types of a new species {Galaxias huitoni) ; presented by the 
late Captain F. W. Hutton, f.r.s. 

Twenty-seven specimens from Tahiti ; presented by 
C. L. Wragge, Esq. 

Eighty-one specimens from the United States ; received 
from the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago. 

Thirty-one Pesciform Fishes from North America ; 
received in exchange from Prof. C. H. Eigenmann. 

K 2 



134 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Four American Salmon and Trout (Salmo ouananiche, 
S. gairdneri and S. irideus), bred in Wales ; presented by 
the Kt. Hon. Lord Denbigh. 

Eight hundred and seventy-two specimens from Mexico, 
collected and described by Dr. S. E. Meek, including examples 
of several species new to the collection ; received in exchange 
from the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago. 

Type specimens of four Cichlid Fishes (Cichlosoma 
Tostratum,, C. centrarchus, G. halteatum and C. basilare), 
described by Dr. Gill, from Lake Nicaragua ; received in 
exchange from the Smithsonian Institution. 

Thirty-one specimens froKi Jamaica, collected by C. A. 
Wray, Esq. 

Types of Percichthys altispinis, from Buenos Ayres, and 
Scicena bedsti from Cuba ; received in exchange from the 
Geneva Museum. 

Twenty-six specimens from British Guiana, including the 
types of a new Loricariid (Ancistrus hovallii) ; presented by 
Dr. C. Bovallius. 

Thirteen specimens from Brazil, including the types of 
four new species of Plecostomus described by Mr. R. von 
Ihering ; received in exchange from the San Paulo Museum. 

One of the type specimens of Galaxias a^nnus Jenyns, 
from Tierra del Feugo ; received from the Zoological Museum 
of Cambridge University. 

MoUusca. — Two thousand six hundred and twenty-eight 
specimens were acquired during the year. The following are 
the most important series : — 

Altogether one hundred and thirty-two types of species 
from various localities were obtained by purchase, and 
fifty-four by presentation. 

Eighty land, fresh-water and marine shells from South 
Africa, &c., including the types of twenty-seven species ; 
presented by J. H. Ponsonby, Esq. 

Seventeen specimens of Indian Mollusca, including the 
types of fourteen species ; presented by the late Dr. W. T. 
Blanford, c.i.E. 

Seventy-four land shells belonging to recently described 
species from Japan ; purchased. 

One hundred and eighty-six marine Mollusca from 
antarctic localities and three hundred and fifty-one from 
the Auckland Islands, obtained by the ''Discovery" Expe- 
dition. Several new and interesting forms were included in 
these collections. 

One hundred and forty-six marine shells from Cape Verd 
Island, including several new species and others new to the 
collection ; purchased. 

Fifty-six specimens, mostly marine, from Tierra del Fnego, 
including six new species ; collected and presented by Capt. 
Hichard Crawshay. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 135 

Ninety-four marine shells from Montebello Islands, N.W. 
Australia ; presented by T. H. Haynes, Esq. 

Seventy-seven marine shells from Ceylon, including the 
types of forty-seven new species described by H. B. Preston ; 
purchased. 

Fifty specimens of Olividas, including several interesting 
varieties ; presented by F. G. Bridgman, Esq. 

One hundred and four marine shells from the Gulf of 
Oman and the Persian Gulf, including the types of forty-six 
species described by J. C. Melvill ; purchased. 

Thirty-four land slugs, named by W. E. Collinge, and 
including the types of seven species from various localities ; 
purchased. 

Forty-four land shells from South Africa, including 
several interesting species of Achatina ; presented by J. F, 
Quekett, Esq. 

Crustacea. — The additions number one thousand three 
hundred and seventy-eight, of which the following are the 
most important : — 

Two male specimens of the Giant Japanese Crab (Macro- 
cheira kaempferi) ; presented by R. Gordon-Smith, Esq. 

Five terrestrial Isopoda from Crete ; presented by Miss 
D. M. A. Bate. 

Five Crabs from Sierra Leone ; presented by Major F. 
Smith, D.S.O., R.A.M.C. 

Four hundred and thirty- one Amphipoda from Ceylon, 
including the types of thirty-seven new species ; presented 
by Prof. W. A. Herdman, F.E.S. 

One hundred and seventy-eight Cladocera, Amphipoda, 
and Schizopoda ; collected by the "Research" Expedition, 
and including the types of four new species ; presented by 
Dr. G. H. Fowler, f.r.s. 

Twenty Decapoda and Cirripedia from Cape Colony ; 
purchased. 

Eleven Crayfish from Central and Eastern Europe ; 
purchased. 

Twenty-seven Crayfish from Italy ; presented by the 
Turin Museum. 

Nine Crustacea from South Africa, being co-types of 
recently described species ; presented by Rev. T. R. R. 
Stebbing, f.r.s. 

Two hundred and eighty- eight Cumacea, Schizopoda, and 
Decapoda, from the AVest of Ireland, including types of 
seventeen new or recently described species ; presented by 
the Department of Agriculture for Ireland. 

One hundred and nine Ostracoda, Amphipoda, and Schizo- 
poda from the " Oceana " Expedition, including the types of 
two new species ; presented by George Murray, Esq., f.r.s. 

Ten Crayfish from Denmark; presented by Mr. C, J, 
With. 



136 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Twenty-six marine Decapoda and Amphipoda from 
Jamaica ; collected by Mr. C. A. Wray for the Museum. 

Two specimens of a new species of River-Crab (Paratel- 
phusa spinescens) from Yunnan ; purchased. 

Eighteen Phyllopoda and two Decapoda from South 
Australia ; presented by H. J. Hillier, Esq. 

Nine Crayfish from Ireland ; presented by E. W. L. 
Holt, Esq. 

Eighty Decapoda from Singapore and Malacca ; presented 
by W. F. Lanchester, Esq., b.a. 

Ten Decapoda from Great Natuna ; presented by the Hon. 
Walter Rothschild, m.p. 

Nineteen Fresh-water Decapoda from British Guiana ; 
presented by Dr. C. Bovallius. 

Six Decapoda from the Blue Nile, including one species 
new to the collection ; presented by Capt. Stanley Flower. 

Thirty-nine Cumacea from the ''Siboga" Expedition, 
including co-types of five new species ; presented by Prof. 
Max Weber. 

Arachnida and Myriopoda. — The accessions numbered 
five thousand two hundred and eighteen, of which the most 
important were : — 

Three thousand eight hundred and eleven Spiders and 
Harvest-Spiders from Central America, including types of all 
the species described in the " Biologia Centrali-Americana" ; 
presented by F. D. Godman, Esq. 

Eighteen Arachnida and Myriopoda from the Upper 
Amazons ; presented by M. Eugene Robuchon. 

Nine Hundred Arachnida and Myriopoda, chiefly from 
South America ; purchased. 

Ninety-five Arachnida and Myriopoda from Cape Colony ; 
purchased. 

Fifteen Pseudoscorpions from Scotland ; presented by 
Robert Godfrey, Esq. 

Eighteen Scorpions, Spiders and Centipedes from West 
Australia ; presented by Dr. W. H. Ince. 

Forty-two Arachnida and Myriopoda from Cocos Keeling 
Island ; presented by F. Wood-Jones, Esq. 

Insecta. — The accessions for the year amounted to two 
hundred and fourteen thousand three hundred and seventy, 
distributed in the following manner : — 

Coleoptera ----.-- 186,038 

Lepidoptera- - 20,099 

Rhynchota ----- ^ ^ 1,626 
Diptera -___.-- 3,598 

Hymenoptera ------ 1,611 

Orthoptera 788 

Neuroptera ------- 499 

Thysanura and Collembola - - - - 74 

Nests, &c. 37 

Total - - - 214,370 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 137 

The most important of these are the following : — 

(From various Localities.) 

The magnificent collection of Coleoptera, formed by the 
late Mr. Alexander Fry, consisting of between 150,000 and 
200,000 specimens, including numerous types and a large 
number of rarities new to the Museum. The specimens are 
mostly named, and are labelled with their localities. The 
collection contains a large number of novelties collected by 
the late Mr. Doherty in the Malay Archipelago, also a fine 
series of the species collected by the late Mr. Whitehead at 
Kinabalu, and described by H, W. Bates. It is particularly 
rich in Rhynchophora and Longicornia ; bequeathed. 

A first portion of Dr. D. Sharp's extensive collection of 
Coleoptera, consisting of 22,000 water-beetles, Dytiocidse, 
including 500 type specimens ; purchased. 

Five thousand specimens of Coleoptera, being a selection 
from the collection of Cassididse formed by the late Dr. J. S. 
Baly, including 192 type specimens ; purchased. 

One thousand five hundred and sixty-six Coleoptera; 
purchased. 

One hundred and twenty-seven Coleoptera ; obtained by 
exchange. 

One hundred and fourteen Hymenoptera, chiefly types ; 
purchased. 

Three hundred and fifty-two Moths, thirteen Butterjflies, 
and four other Insects, from Jamaica ; fifty- two Moths from 
Argentina ; and ninety-five Lepidoptera, twelve Coleoptera, 
five Hymenoptera, from various localities ; presented by the 
Right Hon. Lord Walsingham. 

(From Europe.) 

One hundred and ten Diptera from Crete ; presented by 
Miss D. M. A. Bate. 

One hundred Ghrysididce, named by M. Du Buysson ; 
purchased. 

One hundred and eighteen British Lepidoptera ; presented 
by G. T. Porritt, Esq. 

(From Africa.) 

Five hundred and eighteen Diptera, sixty-one Lepidoptera, 
eight Hymenoptera, and one Cicada, from North-Eastern 
Rhodesia ; presented by R. Codrington, Esq. 

Five hundred and fifty-two Moths from Coomassie; 
presented by Prof. C. Stewart. 



138 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BEITISH MUSEUM. 

Two hundred and sixty-four Lepidoptera, fifty-one Cole- 
optera, twenty Neuroptera, fifteen Orthoptera, and two 
Khyncliota, from Mashonaland and South Africa, including 
numerous types and co-types ; presented by G. A. K. 
Marshall, Esq. 

(From Asia.) 

Fifty Butterflies from the Nicobar Islands ; presented by 
G. Rogers, Esq. 

One hundred Butterflies ; presented by Colonel C. T. 
Bingham. 

Six Butterflies and two hundred and ninety-five Moths, 
from Haw^aii ; presented by the Joint Committee of the 
Royal Society and British Association for investigation of 
the Fauna of the Sandwich Islands. 

One thousand eight hundred and eighty Mosquitoes from 
India; presented by Major J. R. Adie, i.M.s. 

Three hundred and ninety-two Coleoptera, two hundred 
and thirty-one Hemiptera, eighty-eight Orthoptera, seventy- 
nine Hymenoptera, fifty-four Neuroptera, one hundred and 
fifty Lepidoptera, and thirteen Diptera, from India ; presented 
by Dr. A. Jayakar. 

One hundred and sixty-two Butterflies from Japan ; 
presented by H. J. Elwes, Esq., F.R.S. 

Three hundred and fifty-six Butterflies from British New 
Guinea; presented by G. Kenrick, Esq. 

Three hundred and seventy-eight Butterflies from Sikkim 
and Bhutan ; presented by G. C. Dudgeon, Esq. 

Eighty-five Butterflies, and ninety Moths, from Taurus 
Mountains ; purchased. 

One hundred and fifty Butterflies, and one hundred and 
seventy Moths, from Assam ; presented by E. C. Ward, Esq. 

Six hundred and fifty Lepidoptera, forty-eight Hymen- 
optera, forty-two Coleoptera, eighteen Orthoptera, nine 
Neuroptera, four Diptera. and two Rhynchota, from the 
Malay Peninsula ; presented by H. N. Ridley, Esq. 

(From Australasia.) 
Five hundred and sixty Coleoptera ; obtained by exchange. 

Ninety-two Rhynchota, and six hundred and sixty-eight 
Hymenoptera, from Queensland ; presented by Dr. A. J. 
Turner. 

One hundred and thirty-eight Coleoptera, one hundred 
and fifty-five Hymenoptera, ninety-eight Orthoptera, forty- 
four Neuroptera, fifty-two Rhynchota, and four Diptera, 
from South Australia ; presented by H. J. Hillier, Esq. " 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 139 

(From America.) 

A further consignment of Central American Coleoptera, 
consisting of 8,618 specimens of Hydradophaga, Hydrophilidse, 
Brachelytra and Clavicornia. Also 4,727 Lepidoptera- 
(Satyrinse), 885 Homoptera (Membracidse), and 196 Ephe- 
meridae; presented by F. D. Godman, Esq., ll.d., f.r.s. 

Seven hundred and twenty-seven Moths, one hundred and 
seventy-four Orthoptera, and fourteen Neuroptera, from 
Paraguay ; presented by W. Foster, Esq. 

Four hundred and sixty-five Butterflies, one hundred and 
fourteen Hymenoptera, ninety Coleoptera, thirty-three Rhyn- 
chota, and sixty-five Diptera, from Paraguay ; purchased. 

Two hundred and fifteen Moths, from Alberta; presented 
by F. H. Wolley Dod, Esq. 

One hundred and two Coleoptera, from the Argentine 
Republic ; presented by A. F. Bayne, Esq. 

Two thousand four hundred and ninety-six Moths, and 
six hundred and thirty-nine Butterflies, from North and 
South America ; presented by W. Schaus, Esq. 

Prototracheata. — The ten accessions were obtained by 
purchase, and proved to be Peripatus corradiivom. Ecuador ; 
they were determined by Prof. Bouvier. 

Vermies. — The four hundred and forty-seven accessions 
includes four Oligocha^ta from Christmas Island, collected 
and presented by Dr. Hanitsch, and determined by Prof. Rosa ; 
the greater number are from the Beddard Collection. Four 
from the Antarctic were determined by Dr. Linstow, 

Echinoclerma. — The accessions totalled two hundred and 
eighty-five, including two hundred and twenty specimens 
from the Antarctic region collected by the " Discovery " ; 
only the specimens that have as yet been named have been 
registered. 

Six deep-sea Holothurians, presented by the trustees of 
the Indian Museum, and determined by Prof. Koehler. 

Seven interesting specimens, including the new Echinus 
tenuispinis, from the Irish Board of Agriculture. 

Several specimens of Toxopneustes variegatus from 
Kingston Harbour, collected by Mr. C. A. Wray, remarkable 
for the fixation of the generative products at the sites of the 
genital orifices. 

Anthozoa. — The twenty-one specimens of Porites from 
various localities in the Pacific Ocean, which had been studied 
during the preparation of Vol. V. of the Catalogue of Corals, 
were presented, partly by Mr. J. Stanley Gardiner and partly 
by the University Museum of Zoology at Cambridge. 



140 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Canon Norman supplied the Museum with a good series 
of Corals collected in British seas ; a selection of which is 
now exhibited. A very fine example of a Gorgonella from 
Zanzibar was presented by Mr. J. T. Last ; this will be 
mounted for exhibition. 

Tunicata, Hydrozoa, Polyzoa, Porifera, Protozoa. 
Among the acquisitions worthy of mention are : — 

Nine bottles containing named samples of Plankton 
Radiolaria, and eighteen bottles containing pelagic Tunicata, 
including the various stages in the life-history of Doliolum, all 
from the Faroe Channel. The specimens were collected by 
Dr. G. H. Fowler, while on board H.M.S. '' Research." 

Fifty-one specimens of Polyzoa, eleven MS. boxes full of 
original drawings and notes on the H3'^drozoa and Polyzoa 
of the Busk Collection, and sets of Plates of Polyzoa from 
rare and valuable publications, e.g., Savigny's " Description 
de I'Egypte," constituting the final instalment of the Busk 
Collection; presented by the Misses Busk. 

A collection of nineteen specimens of Hydrozoa from 
the Maldive and Laccadive Archipelagoes, including several 
co-types, described by Edward T, Browne ; collected and 
presented by J. Stanley Gardiner, Esq. 

VI. — Visitors and Students. 

The total number of visits paid during the year to the 
three Sections of the Department by Students and other 
persons requiring assistance or information amounted to 
11,811, as compared with : — 

11,824 in the year 1904. 



10,633 


1902. 


12,813 


1901. 


11,923 


1900. 


10,728 


1899. 


10,830 


1898. 


9,708 


1897. 


7,995 


1896. 


8,189 


1895. 




E. Ray Lankester, 




Director and Acting Keeper 




of Zoology. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 141 



Department OF Geology. 
I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Mammalia (Galleries 1 and 2). — The Eoliths exhibited 
in table-case 1 have been re-arranged and re-tableted. 

Pier-case 3, containing Primates and Carnivora, has been 
cleaned and re-painted. The skulls of Lemuroids from Mada- 
gascar, and some of the larger skulls of Carnivora have been 
newly mounted on stands, with printed labels ; and the 
smaller remains of Hycena have been re-tableted, in revised 
order, with printed labels. 

The unexhibited remains of Felidse and Hysenidse in 
drawers have been re-arranged and completely labelled. 

The smaller specimens of Ganis in table-case 2 have been 
re-tableted, with printed labels. 

A skull of Ovihos moschatus from the Severn valley has 
been mounted and placed in pier-case 16. * 

A plaster cast of a fore limb of Arsinoitherium zitteli 
has been mounted on a pedestal adjoining pier-case 22. 

Some Sirenian remains from the Eocene of Egypt have 
been mounted and added to pier-case 30. 

The catalogued Lagomorphous Rodentia have been 
arranged in drawers and re-labelled in accordance with the 
forthcoming catalogue. 

A selection of jaws and teeth of the pigmy elephant, 
Elephas Cypriotes, from the caverns of Cyprus, has been 
tableted, with printed labels, in table-case 17a. 

Pier-case 38, containing the remains of the Pleistocene 
North American Mastodon, has been re-arranged, re-fitted, and 
painted. 

Pier-case 39 (40) has also been re-arranged, refitted, and 
painted. It contains the Pleistocene South American Mastodon, 
with the skull and mandible of the contemporaneous North 
American Mastodon for comparison. 

Restored models of the skull and mandible of Falwo- 
mastodon and Moeritherium have been mounted and placed 
for comparison with the actual fossils, which are being 
re-arranged to include recent acquisitions, in wall-case 43. 

Number of specimens of Mammalia registered, 262. 

Aves (Gallery 2). — A plaster cast of a hind limb of 
jEpyornis titan has been mounted on a pedestal near wall- 
case 25. 

Number of specimens of Aves registered, 17. 

Reptilia and Am.phihia (Galleries 3, 4, 5). — The cases 
have been re-numbered in accordance with the new edition of 
the Guide Book recently published. 



142 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

New general descriptive labels have been prepared and 
printed for the Ornithosauria and Ichthyosauria. 

New cabinets with more commodious drawers have been 
fixed beneath the table-cases 5 to 23, and the unexhibited 
remains of Ornithosauria, Crocodilia, and Ichthyosauria, be- 
sides a few Dinosauria and Rhynchocephalia, have been 
transferred to them. There has also been some re-arrange- 
ment of the Crocodilia, Dinosauria, and Ichthyosauria in the 
table-cases. 

The smaller remains of Rhynchosauria have been tableted, 
with printed labels, in table-case 14. 

The plaster cast of the large skeleton of Diplodocus 
camegii, from the Jurassic of Wyoming, U.S.A., has been 
mounted on a special pedestal in the Gallery of Reptiles, 
Department of Zoology. 

The hind limbs of Getiosaurus oxoniensifi and Bronto- 
saurus excelsus have been re-mounted on a new pedestal near 
the specimen of Getiosaurus leedsi. 

The plaster cast of the femur of Atlantosaurus immanis 
has been similarly re-mounted on an adjacent new pedestal. 

Some small remains of Getiosaurus leedsi, with American 
bones of Di])lodocus and Brontosaurus, have been mounted, 
labelled, and arranged on the floor of case L. 

A diagram-restoration of the skeleton of Polacanthus foxi 
has been prepared, framed, and labelled, and placed with the 
actual remains of the skeleton in wall-case 4. 

The lower portion of wall-case 15 has been entirely re- 
arranged and re-fitted to accommodate various recently- 
acquired Ichthyosauria, including the new specimen which 
displays contained embryos. 

Two specimens, showing gizzard-stones in a fossilised 
Plesiosaurian stomach, have been added to table-case 29. 

The remarkable skulls and jaws of Theriodonts from the 
Karoo Formation of South Africa, presented by Alfred 
Brown, Esq., have been tableted and provided with printed 
labels in table-case 31. 

A new specimen of Testudo ammon, from the Eocene of 
Egypt, has been mounted in wall-case 19, and a plaster cast 
of another example of this tortoise has been placed on the 
top of the same case. 

The Labyrlnthodonts exhibited in table-case V have been 
arranged and re-tableted with printed labels. Various recent 
acquisitions and an explanatory label have been added. 

Number of specimens of Reptilia and Amphibia registered, 
255. 

Pisces (Gallery 6). — The table-cases have been re-num- 
bfered in accordance with the new edition of the Guide Book 
recently published. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 143 

The naming of the Anaspida, Heterostraci, and Osteostraci 
has been revised ; and the specimens have been re-arranged 
in accordance with the forthcoming Supplementary Catalogue. 

The unexhibited specimens of Asterolepis in drawers 
have been re-arranged and labelled while incorporating recent 
acquisitions. 

A new specimen of Trygon, from the Eocene of Monte 
Bolca, has been mounted in a glazed frame on the wall 
between wall-cases 3 and 4. 

A new cabinet, to contain the large unexhibited bones of 
Leedsia prohlematica, has been placed beneath the tail 
of this gigantic fish between wall-cases 13 and 14. 

The series of Ctenothrissidse from the English Chalk, 
exhibited in table-case 26, has been revised, and all the 
specimens have been re-tableted, with printed labels. 

Number of specimens of Pisces registered, 184. 

Mollusca (Galleries 7 and 8). — A plaster cast of the 
largest known Ammonite {Pachydiscus sepiDenradensis), 6 ft. 
8 in. in diameter, from the Upper Cretaceous of Westphalia, 
has been mounted on the wall at the North end of Gallery 7. 

Various recently acquired Triassic and Jurassic Nautili 
and Ammonites have been mounted, labelled, and added to 
the cases in Gallery 7. 

The unexhibited collection of Ammonites from the White 
Jura of Germany has been revised, re-arranged, and re-labelled. 

The table-cases of British Jurassic and Cretaceous 
Lamellibranchia and Gastropoda, in Gallery 8, have been 
partially re-arranged while revising the Guide Book. 

Series of newly described Eocene Lamellibranchia and 
Gastropoda from Nigeria and Somaliland have been mounted 
and labelled for exhibition in wall-case 3, Gallery 8. 

Number of specimens of Mollusca registered : Cephalopoda, 
933 ; Gastropoda, 4,174 ; Lamellibranchia, 4,247. 

Arthropoda (Gallery 8). — The registration, labelling, and 
arrangement of the unexhibited Phyllocarida, Ostracoda, 
and Cirripedia in drawers are now nearly completed ; and 
some progress has been made with the unexhibited Malacos- 
traca. 

A slab of Upper Cambrian limestone from North China, 
with numerous trilobites, has been framed, labelled, and 
placed in wall-case 14. 

Number of specimens of Arthropoda registered, 3,206. 

Vermes (Gallery 8). — A fine group of Serpulo, advena, from 
the Upper Old Red Sandstone of Caldy Island, lias been 
tableted and provided with a printed label in table-case 79. 

Number of specimens of Vermes registered, 151. 



144 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Polyzoa (Gallery 8). — The small cabinets of drawers, 
removed from the Gallery of Fossil Reptiles, have been 
placed in new frames round the walls of the work-room 
behind the Departmental Library. They are now occupied 
by the unexhibited collection of Polyzoa, which has been 
transferred from the drawers in Gallery 8. 

The arrangement and labelling of the unexhibited Jurassic 
Polyzoa, including recent acquisitions, have been completed. 

Number of specimens of Polyzoa registered, 539. 

Brachiopoda (Gallery 8). — The arrangement and labelling 
of Brachiopoda in drawers have been continued, those from 
the Arctic Regions and from European Jurassic Formations 
having been completed. 

A series of Devonian Brachiopoda from the Hindu Khoosh 
has been placed on exhibition in wall-case 11, and examples 
of several rare genera have been added to the systematic 
series of foreign Brachiopoda. 

Number of specimens of Brachiopoda registered, 2,833. 

Echinoderma (Gallery 8), — The Irregular Echinoidea from 
the English Chalk, exhibited in table-case 78, have been 
revised, re-tableted with printed labels, and re-arranged to 
illustrate their zonal distribution. 

The British Cretaceous Asteroidea have been revised and 
partly re- registered, while those described or referred to in the 
Palseontographical Society's Monograph of British Cretaceous 
Echinoderma have been marked. 

A few Miocene Echinoids from Holstein have been 
tableted, with printed explanatory labels, in wall-case 18. 

A series of rocks, largely composed of Echinoderm 
remains from the passage beds between the Cretaceous and 
Tertiary systems of Denmark, has been provided with 
explanatory labels and placed in wall-case 1-5. 

Various figured specimens of British Echinoidea, Aster- 
oidea, and Ophiuroidea have been re-mounted and furnished 
with printed labels in table cases 75-77. 

Number of specimens of Echinoderma registered, 1,129. 

New cabinets of drawers have been placed beneath some 
of the central cases in Gallery 8, to afford needed accommo- 
dation for the unexhibited collection. 

Anthozoa (Gallery 10). — The collection of Cretaceous 
Corals has been ar]*anged, labelled, and completely registered 
while incorporating recent acquisitions from the Tomes 
Collection and from Northern Spain. 

A typical collection of British Cretaceous Corals has been 
arranged, tableted, and labelled, with explanatory diagrams, 
in table-cases 1 and 2. 



DEPAUTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 145 

The Portlandian Corals have been similarly arranged, and 
a selection has been tableted and labelled in table-case 2. 

The re-arrangement of the unexhibited collection of 
Corallian Corals has been begun. 

Number of specimens of Anthozoa registered, 2,628. 

Hydrozoa, Porifera, and Protozoa (Gallery 10). — A 
specimen of the problematical Lodanella, from the Lower 
Devonian of Cornwall, has been mounted, with an explanatory 
diagram and printed label, in table-case 15. 

Number of specimens registered, 416. 

PlantcB (Gallery 10). — A typical collection of leaves from 
the Lower Eocene Clays of Alum Bay, Isle of Wight, has 
been arranged, tableted, and labelled in table-case 18. 

The unexhibited collection of Rhsetic and Triassic plants 
has been arranged and labelled in drawers. 

An exhibition of Triassic plant-remains in wall-case 14 has 
been planned, and the fittings have been prepared. 

The arrangement, mounting, and labelling of the Carboni- 
ferous plants in wall-case 17 have been completed. 

The base of a stem of Sigillaria, from the Coal Measures 
of Northumberland, has been mounted on a pedestal near the 
entrance to Gallery 10. 

New labels have been prepared for the Lower Carboni- 
ferous Coniferous tree exhibited in the grounds of the 
Museum. 

Number of specimens of Plantee registered, 497. 

Dynamical Collection and Tracks, &c. (Gallery 11). — 
Some blocks of Magnesian Limestone from Durham, ex- 
hibiting remarkable concretionary structures, have been 
mounted on a pedestal at the North end of Gallery 11. 

An additional Geological Section drawn by William Smith 
has been framed and exhibited with those already on the 
wall of Gallery 11. 

Number of specimens registered, 6. 

II. — Work of Mason, Assistant Mason, and Workshop 
Attendant. 

A large number of Tertiary mammalian remains from 
Egypt, Greece (Pikermi), Crete, Spain (Concud), and Pata- 
gonia (Santa Cruz) have been extricated from the matrix, 
hardened, and prepared for study or exhibition, 

A skeleton of the pigmy hippopotamus {Hippopotamus 
minutus), from the caverns of Crete, has been reconstructed 
from isolated bones and mounted for exhibition ; the missing 
parts being restored in plaster and wood. 

A plaster cast of the skeleton of Hippidium from the 
Argentine Pampa has been mounted for exhibition ; the few 
missing parts having been modelled in plaster. 



146 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A series of limb-bones of Diprotodon, from South Aus- 
tralia, has been prepared and hardened for mounting. 

The large specimen of Ichthyosaurus platyodon, from the 
Lower Lias of Stockton, has been repaired, and decaying 
pyrites has been removed from the rock. 

Plesiosaurian remains and two Crocodilian skulls, from 
the Oxford Clay of Peterborough have been prepared for 
exhibition. 

A skeleton of Pteranodon, from the Chalk of Kansas, has 
been prepared and hardened. 

Numerous repairs were done to the various parts of the 
plaster cast of Diplodocus carnegii. 

A large specimen of the branchial arches of Leedsia pro- 
hlematica, from the Oxford Clay of Peterborough, has been 
prepared for study and exhibition. 

Fishes from the Chalk of Kansas have been prepared and 
fixed in frames. A few fishes from the English Chalk have 
also been prepared. 

The plaster cast of the gigantic Ammonite (Pachy discus) 
has been fixed to the end wall of Gallery 7. 

Numerous specimens have been reduced and prepared 
before incorporation in the collection, notably Fishes, 
Crustacea, and Cephalopoda. 

Some large specimens of Carboniferous Plants, including 
the stem of Sigillaria, have been prepared for exhibition. 

Six blocks of Magnesian Limestone have been trimmed 
and prepared for exhibition. 

Numerous moulds and plaster casts of fossils have been 
made, including a series of coloured casts for presentation to 
the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburg. 

The Mason has also made a few plaster casts of fishes and 
Amphibians for the Department of Zoology. 

III. — Printing of Labels. 

The Museum Printer continues to devote one day each 
week to the preparation of labels for the Department of 
Geology ; but a Boy Attendant in the Department composes 
and prints most of the labels, and has this year prepared 
upwards of 727 (and 9,286 prints of these). 

IV. — Exchanges and Duplicates. 

Exchanges of plaster casts and duplicate fossils have been 
made with the following institutions : — Royal Scottish 
Museum, Edinburgh ; Geological Museum, University of 
Leyden ; and the American Museum of Natural History, New 
York. An exchange of Jurassic Gastropoda was also made 
with Mr. L. Eichardson. 



Department of geology. 147 

Small plaster casts have also been supplied for pur- 
poses of research to Prof. E. Koken and Mr. F. Springer. 

Duplicate fossils have been presented to the Surveyors' 
Institution ; St. Paul's School ; University College, Aber- 
ystwyth ; Royal Albert Memorial Museum, Exeter ; and the 
Hastings Institute, Worcester. 

V. — Departmental Library. 

The additions to the Library, which have been registered, 
stamped, catalogued, and press-marked, comprise 191 new 
works and pamphlets, of which 92 were purchased and 
99 presented ; 501 parts of serials in progress, of which 291 
were purchased, and 210 presented ; and 78 maps, of which 30 
sheets were purchased and 48 sheets presented, 129 volumes 
have been bound. 

VI. — Publications. 

The Catalogue of the Glossopteris Flora has been pub- 
lished. 

The MS. of the Catalogue of the Tertiary Vertebrata of 
the Fayutn is nearly completed, and about half the volume is 
in type. The MSS. of the Catalogues of Fossil Rodentia and 
Fossil Fishes (Supplement) are also in progress, and two 
sheets of the former Catalogue are in type. 

The Guide Book to Fossil Reptiles, Amphibians, and 
Fishes has been re-written by the Keeper, and this new 
edition has been published. The preparation of a new Guide 
Book to the Fossil Invertebrata has been begun. 

A new List of Casts and Moulds of Fossils in the Depart- 
ment of Geology has also been prepared, and will shortly be 
published. 

The following descriptive papers dealing with various 
parts of the collection, chiefly recent acquisitions, have been 
published in scientific journals during 1905 : — 

By A. S. Woodward, ll.d., f.r.s. 

1. On Parts of the Skeleton of Cetiosaurus leedsi, a 
Sauropodous Dinosaur from the Oxford Clay of Peterborough. 
Proc Zool. Soc, 1905, vol. i., pp. 232-243, text-figs. 39-49. 

2. On some Abdominal Ribs of Hyperodapedon, from the 
Keuper Sandstone of Hollington. Trans. N. Staffs. Field 
Club, vol. xxxix., pp. 115-117, pi. iii. 

3. Permo-Carboniferous Fishes and Labyrinthodonts from 
Kashmir. Palseont. Indica, n.s., vol. ii., mem. no. 2. 

4. Note on some portions of Mosasaurian Jaws obtained 
by Mr. G. E. Dibley from the Middle Chalk of Cuxton, Kent. 
Proc. Geol. Assoc, voL xix., pp. 185-187, text-figs. 1; 2. 

124. L 



148 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

By F. A. Bather, M.A., D.sc. 

1. The Echinoid Name Discoidea suhucula. Ann. and 
Mag. Nat. Hist. [7], vol. xv., pp. 145-148. 

2. Sympterura minveri, n.g. et sp. : a Devonian Ophiurid 
from Cornwall. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii. pp. 161-169, pi. vi. 

3. A Wind-worn Pebble in Boulder Clay. Ibid., pp. 358, 
359. 

4. The Mount Torlesse Annelid. Ibid., pp. 532-541, text- 
figs. 1-7. (Note in Abstr. Proc. Geol. Soc, 1905-06, p. 15.) 

By R. B. Newton, f.g.s. 

1. Eocene Shells from Nigeria. Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist. 
[7], vol. XV., pp. 83-91, pi. V. 

2. The Tertiary Fossils of SomaJiland, as represented in 
the British Museum (Natural History). Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc, vol. Ixi., pp. 155-180, pis. xvii-xxi. 

3. Note on the Age and Locality of the Estheviella 
Shales from the Malay Peninsula. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii., 
p. 49. 

4. An Account of some Marine Fossils contained in Lime- 
stone Nodules found on the Mekran Beach, off the Omara 
Headland, Baluchistan. Ibid., pp. 293-303, pis. xvi., xvii. 

5. Note on some Post-Tertiary Mollusca from Ceylon. 
Proc. Malac. Soc, vol. vi., pp. 509, 510. 

6. On Two Miocene Gastropods from Roumania. Ibid., 
pp. 340-345, with 3 text-figs. 

By C. W. Andrews, D.sc, F.G.S. 

1. Note on some recently discovered remains of the Musk- 
Ox (Ov-i^osmoscy^a^us, Zimmermann sp.) from the Pleistocene 
Beds of Southern England. Proc. Zool. Soc, 1905, vol. i., 
pp. 50-53, text-figs. 13, 14. 

2. Notes on some New Crocodilia from the Eocene of 
Egypt. Geol. Mag. [5] , vol. ii., pp. 481-484. 

3. Note on the Species of Palceomastodon. Ibid., pp. 562, 
563. 

By G. C. Crick, A.R.S.M., F.G.S. 

1. On aDibranchiate Cephalopod, Styracoteuthis orientalis, 
n. gen. and n. sp., from the Eocene of Arabia. Proc Malac. 
Soc, vol. vi., pp. 274-278. 

2. On a specimen of Cyrtoceras (Meloceras) apicale from 
the Carboniferous Limestone, Kniveton, Derbyshire. Geol. 
Mag. [5], voL ii., pp. 62-65. 

3. On some Fossil Cephalopoda from North Cornwall, 
collected by Mr. Howard Fox, f.g.s. Ibid., pp. 154-160. 



DEPA-RTMENT OF (JEOLOGY. 149 

By W. D. Lang, B.A., f.g.s. 

1. On Stomatopora antiqua, Haime, and its related Liassic 
Forms. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii., pp. 258-268, pi. xiv. 

By Dr. C. I. Forsyth Major, f.l.s. 

1. Rodents from the Pleistocene of the Western Mediter- 
ranean Region. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii., pp. 462-467, 501-506. 

By Miss D. M. A. Bate. 

1. Four and a half Months in Crete in search of Pleisto- 
cene Mammalian Remains. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii., pp. 193- 
202, pis. ix., X. 

By Prof. H. G. Seeley, f.r.s. 

1. On the Primitive Reptile ProGolophon. Proc. Zool. 
Soc, 1905, vol. i., pp. 218-230, text-figs. 30-38. 

By Baron Franz Nopesa, Junr. 

1. Notes on British Dinosaurs. Part I. Hypsilophodon. 
Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii., pp. 203-208, text-figs. 1-4. 

2. Notes on British Dinosaurs. Part II. Polacanthus. 
Ibid., pp. 241-250, pi. xii., text-figs. 1-8. 

3. Kerunia, a Symbiosis of a Hydractinian with a Cepha- 
lopo'd. Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist. [7], vol. xvi., pp. 95-102, 
pi. iii., text-figs. 1, 2. 

By G. J. Hinde, PH.D., f.r.s. 

1. Note on Fragments of Chert from North China. Geol. 
Mag. [5], vol. ii., p. 255. 

By H. Woodward, ll.d., f r.s. 

1. Note on a series of Trilobites obtained by Mr. Howard 
Fox, F.G,S., f]om the Devonian of Cant Hill, St. Minver, 
Cornwall. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii., pp. 151-154, pi. v., figs. 1-5. 

2. On a Collection of Trilobites from the Upper Cambrian 
of Shantung, North China. Ibid., pp. 211-255, pi. xiii., text- 
figs. 1-2. 

3. Note on a Fossil Crab and a Group of Balani discovered 
in Concretions on the Beach at Ormara Headland, Mekran 
Coast. Ibid., pp. 305-310, text-figs. 1, 2. 

By Prof. T. Rupert Jones, f.r.s. 

1. Note on a Triassic Estheriella from the Malay 
Peninsula. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii., pp. 50-52, pi. ii. 

L 2 



150 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

By H. W. Burrows, F.G.S. 

1. Note on a Bryozoan attached to Nejytunea found in 
one of the Mekran Nodules. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii., pp. 303- 
305, text-fig. 1. 

By 0. Rosenheim, PH.D. 

1. Chitin in the Carapace of Pterygotus osiliensis from the 
Silurian Rocks of Oesel. Proc. Roy. Soc, vol. 76b., pp. 398- 
400. 

By E. A. Newell Arber, m.a., f.l.s. 

1. On the Sporangium-like Organs of Glossopteris 
Browniana. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. Ixi., pp. 324-338, 
pis. XXX., xxxi. 

2. On some New Species of Lagenostoma, a type of 
Pteridospermous Seed from the Coal Measures. Proc. Roy. 
Soc, vol 76b., pp. 245-259, pis i., ii. 

By B. Smith, b.a. 

1. On a Lepidodendroid Stem from the Coal Measures. 
Geol. Mag. [5], vol. ii., pp. 208-211, text-fig. 1. 

By A. C. Seward, m.a., f.r.s. 

1. Permo -Carboniferous Plants from Kashmir. Palseont, 
Indica, n.s., vol. ii., mem. No. 2. 

Various fossils in the Department of Geology have also 
been described and figured by Mr. Henry Woods, Mr. W. K. 
Spencer, and Prof. J. F. Blake, in the Monographs of the 
Palseontographical Society, vol. lix., for 1905. 

Specimens have been lent for original research to Mr. 
Frank Springer (New Mexico), Mr. Henry Woods (Cambridge), 
Dr. N. Sokolov (St. Petersburg). Mr. W. K. Spencer 'Cam- 
bridge), Mr. R. I. Pocock (Zoological Gardens), Mr. E. A. 
Newell Arber (Cambridge), Dr. Wheelton Hind (Stoke-on- 
Trent), Mr. L. Uichardson (Cheltenham), and Mr. R. Kidston 
(Stirling). 



VII. — A cquisitions. 
A. — By Donation. 

Mammalia. — Plaster casts of the skull and other asso- 
ciated bones of Wynyardia hassiana, from the Lower 
Tertiary of Table Cape, Tasmania, the originals being the 
tvpe specimen described by Prof. Baldwin Spencer in Proc. 
Zool. Soc, 1900, pp. 776-795, pis. xlix., 1. Presented by the 
Director, National Museum, Melbourne. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 151 

Mammalian remains from the Eocene of the Fayum, Egypt, 
including a skull of Moeritherium. Presented by Baron 
Franz Nopcsa, junr. 

Four Mammalian teeth from the Miocene beds of Tekfui 
Dagh, Sea of Marmora. Presented by A. Frank Dabell, 
Esq., M.I.M.E. 

A tooth of Castor. Presented by Lieut. -Col. Thomas 
English, F.G.S. 

A Cetacean tooth from the Tertiary near Coquimbo, Chili. 
Presented by Lieut. Boger, r.n. 

Three remains of Edentata from the Pampa of Argentina. 
Presented by Malcolm Graham, Esq. 

A portion of mandible of Stegodon, with third lower 
molar, from Pliocene of Talagang, Jhelum, Punjab. Presented 
by Captain E. T. F. Birrell, r.a.m.c. 

A metacarpus of Bison prisons and skull of Musk-Ox 
(Ovihos moschatus) from the river-gravel near Frampton-on- 
Severn, Gloucestershire, Presented by W. T. Rennie, Esq. 

Frontlet and antlers of Roe-buck (Gapreolus caprea) 
from a deposit of silt, about 12 ft. below the surface near 
the Triangular Lodge, Rushden, near Kettering. Presented 
by James W. Butler, Esq. 

Five Mammalian bones from the Pleistocene Gravel, 
Barnwell, Cambridge, including distal end of femur of Lion 
and part of humerus of Bear. Presented by Thomas Jesson, 
Esq., F.G.S. 

A mandibular ramus of Sus scrofa from the peat, near 
Newbury. Presented by the Bath Literary and Scientific 
Institution. 

Reptilia. — Thirteen plaster-casts of footprints from the 
Lower Keuper Sandstone of Cheshire, described in the Rep. 
Brit. Assoc, Committee on the Flora and Fauna of the Trias, 
Pts. T. and II. Presented by Joseph Lomas, Esq., f.g.s. 

Abdominal ribs of Hyperodapedon from the Keuper 
Sandstone, Hollington, N. Staffs. Presented by John R, B. 
Masefield, Esq. 

Cervical vertebra of Tamhoeria maraisi, Seeley, from 
the Lower Karoo Formation, Tamboer Fontein, Cape Colony, 
being the type specimen, described by the donor in Ann. and 
Mag. Nat. Hist. [7], vol. xiv. (1904) pp. 336-341, figs. 1, 2. 
Also an imperfect dorsal vertebra from the same locality, 
noticed ibid, p= 340. Presented by Prof. H. G. Seeley,. f.r.s. 

A collection of Reptilian Remains from the Karoo 
Formation of Cape Colony, discovered by the donor chiefly 
in the neighbourhood of Aliwal North, and including the 



152 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

following specimens : — 15 remains of Euskelesaurus hrowni, 
described by Prof. Seeley in Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist. [6] vol. 
xiv. fl894), pp. 819-832, figs. 1, 3, 5 ; four remains of Masso- 
spondylus (?) hrowni, Seeley, loc. cit., vol. xv. (1894), 
pp. 119-124, figs. 18, 14 ; one portion of skull of Diademodon 
hrowni, Seeley, Phil. Trans., J 894 B, p. 1037, pi. 89, figs. 13, 
14 ; one portion of skull of Diademodon mastacus, Seeley, 
loc. cit., 1894 B, p. 1035, pi. 89, figs. 11, 12; one skull of 
Microgomphod.on oligocynus, Seeley, loc. cit., 1895 B, p. 31, 
pi. 1., figs. 1-4 ; two skulls of Trirachodon kannemeyeri, 
Seeley, loc. cit., p. 49, pi. 2., figs. 5-8. Presented by Alfred 
Brown, Esq. 

Fifty-five Reptilian remains from the Permian of Texas. 
Presented by Dr. E. C. Case. 

Eight fragments of Ichthyosaurus from the Lias of 
Weston and Ilminster. Presented by the Bath Literary and 
Scientific Institution. 

Two portions of Plesiosaurus and one portion of Ichthyo- 
saurus from the Lias of Weston. Presented by the Rev. 
H. H. Winwood, M.A., f.g.s. 

Remains of a Plesiosaurian with quartzose pebbles 
among the ribs, from the Upper Greensand near the E. end 
of Canal Tunnel, Savernake, Wilts : discovered and noticed 
by the donor, Wilts Archseol. and N.H. Mag., vol. ix. (1865), 
p. 170. Presented by Thomas Codrington, Esq., M.i.c.E., f.g.s. 

Reproduction in plaster of the restored skeleton of 
DiplodoGUS carnegii, from the Jurassic of Wyoming, U.S.A., 
mainly based on the original specimens in the Carnegie 
Museum, Pittsburg, U.S.A. Presented by Andrew Carnegie, 
Esq., LL.D. 

A small restored model of Diplodocus carnegii, made by 
the donor. Presented by W. J. Holland, Esq., ll.d. 

A Chelonian limb-bone and vertebra, and a mandible of 
Crocodilus niloticus and other Crocodilian bone-fragments 
from a marsh at Ause Royale, Mahi Island, Seychelles. 
Presented by Monsieur L. Tonnet. 

Two portions of premaxillse and two of maxillse of Croco- 
dilus niloticus from a marsh at Anse Royale, Mahi Island, 
Seychelles. Presented by H. P. Thomasset, Esq. 

Pisces. — Five fossil fishes from the Upper Silurian of 
JjSbU&rhshire {Thelodus scoticus, lanarkia spinosa, Birkenia 
elegans). Presented by James Young, Esq. 

One Pteraspis crouchi from the Lower Old Red Sand- 
stone Ferryside, Carmarthenshire. Presented by Ernest 
Dixon, Esq., f.g.s. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 153 

Twenty-nine Devonian fish-fragments from Devonsliire, 
collected by R. H. Valpy, Esq., F.G.S., illustrating his 
" Geology of Ilfracombe." Presented by the Trustees of 
the late R H. Valpy, Esq. 

Two specimens of A mhlypterus from the Permo-Carboni- 
ferous of Khunmu, Vihi Valley, Kashmir. (See Seward and 
Woodward, Palseont. Indiea., n.s. vol. ii., no. 2, 1905.) Presented 
by the Director of the Geological Survey of India. 

One tooth of Diplodus and two portions of Pleura- 
canthus from the Permian of Texas. Presented by Dr. E. C 
Case. 

A piece of the Rhsetic bone-bed, Lilliput, Yate. Presented 
by W. H. Wickes, Esq., f.g.s. 

Two fragments of Pachycormus from the Lias of Weston 
and Ilminster. Presented by the Bath Literary and Scientific 
Institution. 

Three fish-teeth from the Lower Cretaceous of France. 
Presented by J. A. Burford, Esq. 

One piece of jaw of Pachyrhizodus from the Chalk of 
Betchworth, Surrey. Presented by H. Eliot Walton, Esq. 

A fossil fish, probably Syllcemus, obtained by Mr. A. 
Cotton from a Cretaceous formation in Ekoi Creek, Calabar 
River, Southern Nigeria. Presented by the Director of the 
Imperial Institute. 

Remains of Siluroids from the Eocene of the Fayum, 
Egypt. Presented by Baron Franz Nopcsa, junr. 

One otolith and a Selachian tooth from the Headon Beds 
of WhiteclifF Bay, Isle of Wight, collected by the donor to 
illustrate his paper in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. xxiv. 
(1868), p, 519. Presented by Thomas Codrington, Esq., 

M.I.C.E., F.G.S. 

One vertebra and fourteen teeth of sharks (Lamnidce) 
from the Middle Miocene, Asphalte Mines, Ragusa, Sicily. 
Presented by Ambroise Pare Brown, Esq. 

One tooth of Carcharodon from a late Tertiary Limestone 
near Pamekasan, Madura Island, Java. Presented by Ivan A. 
Stigand, Esq. 

One Teleostean fish from the Miocene of Tekfui Dagh ; 
three Teleostean fishes from the Oligocene and Miocene of 
Roumania. Presented by A. Frank Dabell, Esq., m.i.m.e. 

Two teeth of Carcharodon rondeleti from Tertiary beds 
near Coquimbo,. Chili. Presented by Lieut. Boger, r.n. 

Mollusca. — An Orthoceras from the Silurian, Nare Cove, 
Porthalla, Cornwall. Presented by C. Davies Sherborn, Esq., 

F.G.S. 



154 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

One Agoniatites sp. from the Devonian, Rope Hawn, near 
St, Austell, Cornwall, and one Orthoceras with striated septa 
from the Taunusian, Polyne Quarry, W. of Looe, Cornwall. 
Presented by Upheld Green, Esq., f.g.s. 

A specimen of Oophinoceras sp. from the Devonian of 
St. Minver, Cornwall, described and figd. by G. C. Crick, GeoL 
Mag., March 1905. Presented by Howard Fox, Esq., f.g.s. 

A hundred Mollusca collected by the late R. H. Valpy, Esq., 
F.G.S., illustrating his " Geology of Ilfracombe " and also a 
paper by R. Etheridge in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1867. 
Presented by the trustees of the late R. H. Yalpy, Esq. 

Five Goniatites from the Upper Devonian, Herault, 
France ; one Ammonite from the Callovian, Foum Islamen, 
Constantine ; twenty-three Cephalopods from the Jurassic of 
France and Switzerland ; and fifty-seven Molluscs from the 
Lower Cretaceous of France. Presented by J. A. Burford, 
Esq. 

Four Lamellibranchs from the Coal Measures, 90 yards 
below Gay's Vein, Ashton Vale Colliery, Bristol ; one Lamelli- 
branch from the Lower Coal Measures, South Liberty Pit, 
Bristol ; one Cephalopod from the Lower Coal Measures, 
Shorneford, near Bacup, Lanes. Presented by Herbert Bolton, 
Esq., F.R.S.E. 

Twelve Molluscs from the Permo-Carboniferous and other 
formations of New South Wales, made by Mr. William Keene 
and noticed by him in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. xxi. (1865), 
p. 138, also enumexated in the " Catalogue of Natural and 
Industrial Products of New South Wales " (International 
Exhibition, 1862), p. 58. Presented by the Bath Literary and 
Scientific Institution. 

An Ammonite (Liparoceras cheltense) from the Middle 
Lias in a railway cutting near Winchcombe. Presented by 
Rev. R. Noble Jackson, m.a. 

An Ammonite with aptychus and two Teuthids from 
the Upper Lias of Ilminster, formerly in the collection of 
the late Charles Moore. Presented by Rev. H. H. Winwood, 

M.A., F.G.S. 

Five Lamellibranchs from the Gault (zone of Hoplites 
interruptus) and four Gastropods from the Lias (zone of 
Ammonites capricornus) from Black Ven, Charmouth. 
Presented by Dr. F. A. Bather, F G.s. 

One Pholadomya hucai^dium from the Cornbrash, E. of 
Corscombe Church, Dorset. Also Ar oophagia cf. radiata 
from the Cenomanian, Charmouth, Dorset. Presented by 
W. D. Lang, Esq., b.a., f.g.s. 

Thirty-nine Mollusca from the Upper Cretaceous of Sierra 
de Montsech, Lerida, Spain, and sixty-one Mollusca from 
the Jurassic of Lerida and Teruel, Spain. Presented by 
Dr. A. S. Woodward, f.r.s. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 155 

Twelve fragments of Ammonites (Perisphinctes) from the 
Upper Jurassic of the State of Chihuahua, Mexico. Presented 
by Henry F. Collins, Esq., F.G.S. 

Two specimens of Unio afF. valdensis, Mantell, from the 
Wealden Formation at Manning's Heath, three miles S. of 
Horsham, Sussex. Presented by Augustus Blakiston, Esq. 

One Macroscaphites gigas from the Lower Greensand, 
Nutfield, Surrey. Presented by the East Surrey Water 
Company. 

One Nautilus radiatus and two Pleurotomaria gigantea 
from the Lower Greensand, Kent. Presented by Jeffrey 
Whitehead, Esq. 

One Pleurotomaria from the Cenomanian of Newington, 
near Folkestone. Presented by Edwin Hambrook, Esq. 

One Actinocamax quadratus from the Chalk near 
Winchester. Collected and presented by Dr. F. A. Bather, 

F.G.S. 

One Actinocamax gramdatus from the Marsupites-zone 
of the Upper Chalk near Flamborough, Yorkshire. Presented 
by Arthur Burnet, Esq. 

An upper mandible of Nautilus from the Upper Chalk, 
Birchington, Kent. Presented by Robert B. Solomon, Esq. 

A specimen of Cardium sphceroideum from the Ceno- 
manian (zone of Fecten asper), Stert, near Devizes ; recorded 
by the donor in his list of fossils, Wilts. Archseol. Mag., 
vol. IX. (1865), p. 176. Also a hundred and thirty Molluscs 
from the Headon Beds of the Isle of Wight, collected by the 
donor to illustrate his paper in the Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 
vol. xxiv., (1868), p. 519. Presented by Thomas Codrington, 
Esq. M.I.C.E., F.G.S. 

Twenty Upper Cretaceous Molluscs and twenty rock 
specimens containing shells from Northern Nigeria, collected 
by Mr. Falconer. Presented by the Director of the Imperial 
Institute. 

Seven Lamellibranchs collected by the donors from the 
Upper Chalk of Surrey. Presented by Messrs. T. H. Withers 
and C, P. Chatwin. 

Forty-two marine Cretaceous shells collected by Mr. James 
(Crawford from the Trigonia-heds of Sunday River, S. Africa. 
Also a hundred and fifty-six fluvio-lacustrine shells collected 
ly Captain Caziot from the Oligocene and Cretaceous deposits 
of the South of France. Presented by E. R. Sykes, Esq., b.a. 

One Ostrea from the Tertiary beds near Coquimbo, Chili, 
and one Jurassic Ammonite from Chili. Presented by Lieut. 
Boger, R.N. 



156 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Eighty-five Molluscs from the Cretaceous of France ; two 
from the Cretaceous of Italy ; two from the Cretaceous of 
Algeria ; fifteen from the Tertiary and Post-Tertiary of 
Antigua and Barbadoes. Presented by A. J. Jukes-Browne, 
Esq., B.A., F.G.S. 

Two specimens of Gyrena horneensis from the Eocene of 
Eastern Borneo. Presented by David Draper, Esq. 

Seven Oysters, probably Alectryonia virleti, from the 
Miocene of Zanzibar. Presented by J. T. Last, Esq. 

Three Gryphcea cochlear, var. navicularis, from the Plio- 
cene of Myrton, Cyprus ; and a Nautiloid and a Gastropod 
from the Glohigerina Limestones of the Idalian Series 
between Pachna and Kissoussa to the N.W. of Limassol, 
Cyprus. Presented by E. H. D. Nicolls, Esq. 

Twenty-seven Tertiary MoUusca from Northern Chili. 
Presented by Herr Albert Holmgren. 

Eight Mollusca from the Tertiary Beds of the Dardanelles. 
Presented by Lieut, -Col. Thomas English, F.G.S. 

Twenty -six Molluscs from the Miocene of Takfui Dagh, 
Sea of Marmora ; and twelve Molluscs from the Miocene of 
Roumania. Presented by A. Frank Dabeli, Esq., m.i.m.e. 

Three pieces of bone-breccia of Post-Pliocene age, containing 
shells of Helix and Trochus, collected by Miss D. M. A. Bate 
in Crete, and described by the donor in Proc. Malac. Soc. 
Presented by Rev. R. Ashington Bullen. 

A valve of Ostrea from the Tertiary deposits of Punta 
Arenas, Chili. Presented by Captain Richard Crawshay. 

Six Lameliibranchs from Clodomiro mine near Capiapo, 
Chili. Presented by Martin Hardie, Esq. 

One Lamellibranch from the Miocene, and sixteen Molluscs 
from the Post-Pliocene deposits of Grisses, N.E. Java. 
Presented by Ivan A. Stigand, Esq. 

Two fossil Gastropod shells from Breccia in the Rock of 
Gibraltar. Presented by Col. C. Wilkinson. 

Ten natural casts of Mollusca, probably referable to exist- 
ing Atlantic species and therefore Post-Tertiary, collected 
from a shelly limestone forming a raised beach deposit, 
180-220 feet above sea-level, within 10 miles of Mossamedes, 
Angola, W. Africa. Presented by R. J. Cuninghame, Esq. 

A piece of fresh-water Limestone with Helix from a 
Quaternary formation, Madeira. Presented by Sir C. Alfred 
Moloney, k.c.m.g. 

One Vallonia pulchella from Holocene, Walton Heath, 
Surrey. Presented by R. H. Chandler, Esq. 

Arthropoda. — Three Trilobites {Ogygopsis hlotzi, Zacan- 
thoides spinosus, and Neolenus serratus) from the Middle 
Cambrian of Field, Mt. Stephen, B.C. Presented by F. G. 
Clark, Esq. 



DEPAETMENT OF GEOLOGY. 157 

Fifty rock fragments containing Trilobites from the Upper 
Cambrian strata in the province of Shantung, N. China, 
inchiding specimens described by Dr. Henry Woodward, 
Geol. Mag., May and June 1905. Presented by Rev. S. 
Couling, M.A. 

Twelve Trilobites collected by the donor from the Llan- 
deilo Beds of Llandrindod Wells. Presented by Dr. C. W. 
Andrews, f.g.s. 

One Trilobite and one Ostracod from the Silurian of 
Canada. Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

Two Trilobites from the Devonian, collected by the late 
R. H. Valpy, Esq., F.G.S. , illustrating his " Geology of 
Ilfracombe," and a paper by R. Etheridge in Quart. Journ. 
Geol. Soc, 1867. Presented by the Trustees of the late 
R. H. Valpy, Esq. 

Five eyes of Phacops from the Lower Devonian (Taunu- 
sian) of Polyne Quarry, near Looe, Cornwall. Presented by 
C. Davies Sherborn, Esq., f.g.s. 

Seven fragments of Dithyrocaris glabra from the Lower 
Carboniferous, Castle Ardross, Fife, noticed by Jones and 
Woodward, " Mon. Palreoz. Phyllopoda " (Pal. Soc, 1899), 
Addenda, p. XII. Presented by W. Tait Kinnear, Esq. 

A restored model of the Carboniferous Arthropod, Prest- 
wichioy rotundata. Presented by Frank Bowcher, Esq. 

Five specimens of Anthrapalmmon from the Carboniferous 
near Glasgow, and near Edinburgh. Presented by Robert 
Dunlop, Esq. 

Six specimens of Estheriella radiata, var. multilineata, 
from the Triassic shales of Pukus, Semanggol, Lerut, Perak. 
Presented by John B. Scrivenor, Esq., B.A., F.G.S. 

A fossil Decapod Crustacean from the Kimmeridge Clay, 
The Fleet, Wyke Regis, Dorset. Presented by Percy W. 
Cruttwell, Esq. 

Three Phyllopods {Estheria) from the Jurassic rocks 
of Heidelburg, Swellendam district. Cape of Good Hope, 
described by the donor, Geol. Mag., 19G1, pp, 350-354, 
figs. 1-4. Presented by Prof. T. Rupert Jones, f.r.s. 

One Scalpellum from the Chalk of Surrey. Collected 
and presented by Messrs. T. H. Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 

Eighteen Crustacea from the Headon Beds of the Isle of 
Wight, collected by the donor to illustrate his paper in 
Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1868, p. 519. Presented by Thomas 
Codrington, Esq., m.i.c.e., f.g.s. 

Echino derma. — One Cystid, Pleurocystis filitextus, from 
the Trenton Limestone of Canada. Presented by the Dowager 
Marchioness of Dufferin and Ava. 

One Lepadocystis moorei (Meek), from the Hudson River 
Group, Richmond, Ind. Presented by A. C. Benedict, Esq. 



158 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Twenty Devonian Crinoidea, collected by the late R. H. 
Valpy, Esq., f.g.s., illustrating his "Geology of Ilfracombe," 
and a paper by R. Etheridge in Quart. Journ. GeoL kSoc, 1867. 
Presented by the Trustees of the late R. H. Valpy, Esq. 

One Crinoid from the Taunusian, Polyne Quarry, W. of 
Looe, Cornwall. Presented by Upfield Green, Esq., F.G.S. 

Thirty-six plates of Crinoidea from shale above the 
Carboniferous Limestone, Cam Beck, near Ribblehead, Yorks. 
Presented by Philip Roscoe, Esq., f.g.s. 

Two specimens of Trochitenkalk with radioles of Cidaris 
grandoBva, from Gaismiihle, near Crailsheim, Wiirtembeig. 
Presented by the Geological Institute of Tiibingen University. 

Three specimens of Isocrinus from the Lower Lias, 
zone of Liparoceras capricornus, Black Ven, Charmouth. 
Presented by Dr. F. A. Bather, f.g.s. 

A Nucleolites clunicularis from the Cornbrash, E. of 
Corscombe Church, Dorset. Presented by W. D. Lang, Esq., 

B.A., F.G.S. 

Four Cretaceous Echinoids from Sierra de Montsech, 
Lerida, and four Jjurassic Echinoderms from L^rida and from 
Teruel, Spain. Presented by Dr. A. S. Woodward, f.r.s. 

Thirteen Echinoids, collected to illustrate their distri- 
bution in zones, from the Chalk of the South of England. 
Presented by C. Davies Sherborn, Esq., f.g.s. 

Eighteen Echinoids (four Micraste'r, two Echinocorys, 
two Holaster,m.nQ Off aster, and one Gonulus)ivom. the Chalk 
near Winchester. Collected and presented by Dr. F. A. 
Bather, f.g.s. 

Fourteen Echinoderms from the Chalk of Surrey. Pre- 
sented by Messrs. T. H. Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 

Seven Echinoids from the Chalk of Kent. Presented by 
G. E. Dibley, Esq., f.g.s. 

One Isocrinus australis preserved in opal, from the 
Upper Cretaceous of White Cliffs, Wilcannia, New South 
Wales. Presented by T. C. Wollaston, Esq. 

Two Echinoids from the Upper Cretaceous of Orofu, 
Northern Nigeria, collected by Mr. Falconer. Presented by 
the Director of the Imperial Institute. 

Four Echinoids from the Lower Cretaceous of France. 
Presented by Ivan A. Stigand, Esq. 

Seventeen Echinoderms from the Cretaceous of France. 
Presented by A. J. Jukes-Browne, Esq., B.A., f.g s. 

A Colony of Echinoids (? Hemiaster) from the London 
Clny beneath Whitestone Pond, Hampstead Heath, 280 feet 
from the surface. Presented by W. E. Avery, Esq. 



DEPAKtMENT OF GEOLOGY lS9 

Six plaster casts of the Echinoids Chuniola carolince, 
S2:)atangus gottschei, and Maretia zeisei, as described and 
figured by Dr. C. Gagel, Jahrb. geol. Landesanst., XXIII., 
p. 52.5. pis. xxiv., XXV. (1903), from drift near Zarrentin, 
S.E. Holstein. Presented by the Director, Konigl. Geolo- 
gische Landesanstalt, Berlin. 

Two Spatangoid Sea-urchins, from the Middle Eocene, 
Kasr-el-Sagha, Fayum, Egypt. Presented by Baron Franz 
Nopcsa, junr. 

One Crinoid of unknown age. Presented by the Bath 
Literary and Scientific Institution. 

Brachiofoda. — One Brachiopod from the Llandeilo beds 
of Llandrindod Wells. Presented by Dr. C. W. Andrews, 

F.G.S. 

Six Brachiopods from the Lower Palaeozoic rocks of 
Canada. Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

Two specimens of Spirifer suhcuspidatus from the Lower 
Devonian (Taunusian) of Polyne Quarry, near Looe, Cornwall. 
Presented by C. D. Sherborn, Esq., f.g.s. 

One Orthis calligramma from Devonian black quartzite, 
Catasuent Cove, Porth Luney, Cornwall. Presented by 
Upfield Green, Esq., F.G.S. 

Six Brachiopods from the Coal Measures, 90 yards below 
Gay's Vein, Ashtou Vale Colliery, Bristol. Presented by 
Herbert Bolton, Esq., f.e.s.e. 

About four hundred and fifty Brachiopods, collected by 
the late R. H. Valpy, Esq., f.g.s., illustrating his '* Geology 
of Ilfracombe," and a paper by R. Etheridge in Quart. Journ. 
Geol. Soc, 1867. Presented by the Trustees of the late 
R. H. Valpy. Esq. 

One Spirifer in Carboniferous Sandstone, from Jack 
Scar, near Middleton-in-Teesdale. Presented by Charles 
Lee, Esq. 

Ten Brachiopods from the Permo-Carboniferous and other 
formations in New South Wales, collected by Mr. William 
Keene and noticed by him in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1865, 
p. 138, also enumerated in the " Catalogue of Natural and 
Industrial Products of New South Wales " (International 
Exhibition, 1862), p. 58. Presented by the Bath Literary 
and Scientific Institution. 

Two Brachiopods from the Lower Cretaceous of France, 
and two from the Carboniferous of Koswa, Oural. Presented 
by J. A. Burford, Esq. 

Five Brachiopods from the Palaeozoic rocks in the 
Murrumbidgee River valley, 50 miles from Yass, New South 
Wales. Presented by A. S. Lukin, Esq. 

Two Brachiopods from the Bradford Clay, Langton 
Herring, Dorset. Presented by Rev. J. L. Templer. 



160 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Four Brachiopods from the Cornbrash, E. of Corscombe 
Church, Dorset, and sixteen Brachiopods from the Cretaceous 
of Cambridge and Norfolk. Presented by W. D. Lang, Esq., 

B.A., F.G.S. 

Ninety- eight Brachiopods from the Jurassic of Lerida and 
of Teruel, Spain. Presented by Dr. A. S. Woodward, f.r.s. 

Three Brachiopods from the Chalk of Surrey. Presented 
by Messrs. T. H. Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 

Four specimens of Crania tuherculata from the Danian 
of Copenhagen. Presented by the Mineralogical Museum of 
the University, Copenhagen. 

Forty-six Cretaceous Brachiopods from France. Presented 
by A. J. Jukes-Browne, Esq., B.A., f.g.s. 

Vermes. — One worm and one Conularia niagarensis 
from the Silurian of Canada. Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

A specimen of Serpula advena from the Upper Old Red 
Sandstone, Sandtap Bay, Caldy Island, Pembroke. Collected 
and presented by Allan Mahood, Esq. 

Six specimens of the supposed Annelid, Nereitopsis 
cornubicus, from the Lower Devonian, Polyne Quarry, Looe, 
Cornwall. Presented by Upfield Green, Esq., f.g.s. 

Four worms from the Jurassic of Lerida and of Teruel, 
Spain. Presented by Dr. A. S. Woodward, f.r.s. 

Ten Annelida from the Gault, zone of Hoplites inter- 
ruptus, Black Ven, Charmouth. Presented by Dr. F. A. 
Bather, f.g.s. 

One Serpula plana from the zone of Micraster coran- 
guinum, Haling Pit, Surrey. Presented by Messrs. T. H. 
Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 

Polyzoa. — One Polyzoan from the Silurian of Canada. 
Presented by Col. 0. C. Grant. 

One Polyzoan from the Wenlock Limestone, Wren's Nest, 
Dudley. Presented by S. Priest, Esq. 

Twenty-nine Devonian Polyzoa collected by the late 
R. H. Valpy, Esq., f.g.s., illustrating his " Geology of Ilfra- 
combe," and a paper by R. Etheridge in Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc, 1867. Presented by the Trustees of the late R. H. 
Valpy, Esq. 

One Polyzoan from the Lower Devonian (Taunusian) 
Polyne Quarry, Looe, Cornwall. Presented by Upfield Green, 
Esq., F.G.S. 

Twenty-one Oolitic Polyzoa from various localities in 
S.W. England, and Membranipora from the Chalk Marl, zone 
of Schloenbachia varians, Evershot, Dorset. Presented by 
Rev. J. L. Templer. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 161 

Two Poljzoa from the Cretaceous of Lerida and six from 
the Jurassic of Teruel, Spain. Presented bv Dr. A. 8. 
Woodward, f.r.s. 

Two specimens of Berenicea portlandica from the 
Portlandian, near Thame, Oxfordshire. Presented by S. S. 
Buckman, Esq., F.G.S. 

One Polyzoan from the Upper Greensand of Pinney Bay, 
Devonshire. Presented by Dr. F. A. Bather. 

Six Polyzoa from the Chalk of Surrey. Presented by 
Messrs. T. H. Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 

Three Cretaceous Polyzoa from France. Presented by 
A. J. Jukes-Browne, Esq., f.g.s. 

Fifty Polyzoa from the Eocene of Belgium. Presented 
by A. Vassall, Esq. 

One Polyzoan from the Headon Beds of Whitecliff Bay, 
Isle of Wight, collected by the donor to illustrate his paper 
in the Quart, Journ. Geol. Soc, 1868, p. 519. Presented by 
Thomas Codrington, Esq,, M.F.C.E., f.g.s. 

Goelentera. — Ten Graptolites from the Silurian of Central 
Wales. Presented by Dr. A. S. Wodward, f.r.s. 

Seventeen Graptolites from the Ordovician and Silurian 
of Central Wales. Presented by Dr. C. W. Andrews, f.g.s. 

Fourteen Corals from the Devonian of Germany and 
fourteen Corals and one Stromatoporoid from the Silurian 
and Devonian of England. Presented by Upfield Green, 
Esq., F.G.S. 

Forty-three Corals and Stromatoporoids from the 
Devonian, collected by the late E. H. Valpy, Esq., f.g.s., to 
illustrate his " Geology of Ilfracombe," and a paper by 
R. Etheridge in the Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1867. Presented 
by the Trustees of the late R. H. Valpy, Esq. 

Six Corals from the Lower Devonian (Taunusian), Polyne 
Quarry, near Looe, Cornwall. Presented by C. Davies 
Sherborn, Esq., F.G.S. 

One Coral from the Palseozoic rocks in the Murrumbidgee 
valley, 50 miles from Yass, New South Wales. Presented by 
A. S. Lukin, Esq. 

Six Corals from the Permo-Carboniferous and other 
formations of New South Wales, collected by Mr. William 
Keene, and noticed by him in Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1865, 
p. 138, also enumerated in the " Catalogue of Natural and 
Industrial Products of New South Wales " (International 
Exhibition, 1862), p. 58. Presented by the Bath Literary 
and Scientific Institution. 

One Coral from the Cornbrash, E. of Corscombe Church, 
Dorset. Presented by W. D. Lang, Esq., b.a., f.g.s. 



162 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Two hundred and fifty Corals from the Upper Cretaceous 
of Sierra de Montsech, Lerida, Spain. Presented by Dr. 
A. S. Woodward, f.r.s. 

Four opalized fossils, probably Corals, fi-om the Upper 
Darling River, New South Wales. Presented ?jy T. C. 
Wollaston, Esq. 

One Parasmilia centralis from the Chalk of Surrey. 
Presented by Messrs. T. H. Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 

One Hydrozoan of doubtful affinities from the Chalk, near 
Winchester. Collected and presented by Dr. F. A. Bather, 
F.G.S. 

Twenty-five specimens of Kerunia cornuta, from the 
Upper Eocene of the Fayum, Egypt. Described and figured 
by the donor in Ann. and Mag., Nat. Hist., July, 1905. Pre- 
sented by Baron Franz Nopcsa,junr. 

Two Anthozoa from the Headon Beds of WhiteclifF Bay, 
Isle of Wight, collected by the donor to illustrate his paper 
in the Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1868, page 519. Presented 
by Thomas Codrington, Esq., m.i.c.e., f.g.s. 

One Coral from the Tertiary rocks of Antigua. Presented 
by A. J. Jukes-Browne, Esq., B.A., F.G.s. 

Porifera. — Three Sponges from the Silurian of Canada. 
Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

One Lodanella from the Lower Devonian (Taunusian) of 
Polyne Quarry, near Looe, Cornwall. Presented by Upfield 
Quen, Esq., f.g.s. 

One Sponge from the Inferior Oolite, zone of Farhinsonia 
':insoni, Shipton Gorge, Dorset. Presented by Rev. J. L. 
Templer. 

Two Sponges from the Chalk of Surrey. Presented by 
Messrs. T. H. Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 

Nine Sponges from the Upper Cretaceous of Sierra de 
Montsech, and six from the Jurrasic of Teruel, Spain. Pre- 
sented by Dr. A. S. Woodward, f.r.s. 

Protozoa. — Tw^o Foraminifera from the Lower Cretaceous 
of France, and one from the Carboniferous of Koswa, Oural. 
Presented by J. A. Burford, Esq. 

Nine Foraminifera from the Carboniferous of Northumber- 
land, and thirteen from the Tertiary of the Isle of Masira, 
S.E. Arabia. Presented by A. Vassall, Esq. 

The type specimen of Ramulina cervicornis, described 
by the donor in Journ. Roy. Micros. Soc, 1896, pi. xii., 
figs. 10, 11, p. 584, from the Gault (bed X), Copt Point, 
Folkestone. Presented by F. Chapman, Esq., A.L.S. 

One Flabellina cor data from the Chalk of S rreJ^ Pre- 
sented by Messrs. T. H. Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 163 

Sixty-five Foraminifera from the Upper Cretaceous of 
Sierra de Montsech, Lerida, and three Miocene Foraminifera 
from Manresa, Spain. Presented by Dr. A. S. Woodward, f.r.s. 

A piece of Foraminifera! limestone from the Miocene of 
Grisses, N.E. Java. Presented by Ivan A. Stigand, Esq. 

A piece of Operculina rock from the Miocene of Zanzibar. 
Presented by J. T. Last, Esq. 

Flantce. — Galamites and Gala'mocladus from the Upper 
Carboniferous, north of Satoralliah-Ujhely, Hungary. Pre- 
sented by A. Gyorgy, Esq. 

Sixteen Plant-remains from the Permo-Carboniferous and 
other formations of New South Wales, collected by Mr. 
William Keene, and noticed by him in Quart. Journ. Geol. 
Soc, vol. xxi. (1865), p. L38, also enumerated in the " Cata- 
logue of Natural and Industrial Products of New South 
Wales" (International Exhibition, 1862), p. 58. Presented 
by the Bath Literary and Scientific Institution. 

Six Plant-remains from the Upper Old Red Sandstone, 
Avon Gorge, Clifton. Presented by William M'Pherson, 
Esq., F.G.s. 

Three specimens of Gangamopteris kashmirensis from 
the Permo-Carboniferous of Khunmu, Vihi Valley, Kashmir 
(see Seward and Woodward, Pal. Indica, n.s., vol. ii., No. 2, 
1905). Presented by the Director of the Geological Survey 
of India. 

Two specimens of Nullipore rock from the Upper Cre- 
taceous of Orofu, Northern Nigeria, collectediby Mr. Falconer. 
Presented by the Director of the Imperial Institute. 

A piece of Travertine containing fossil leaves from the 
Quaternary, Lapithos, N. Cyprus. Presented by E. H. D. 
Nicholls, Esq. 

A piece of fossil wood from Cape Flora, Franz Josef Land, 
noticed in the donor's work, "A Thousand Days in the 
Arctic." Presented by Captain F. G. Jackson. 

Roch Specimens. — An egg-shaped pebble of Devonian 
Limestone from Paignton beach, Devon, and a piece of 
perforated surface of Chalk from Shaw Hill, Newbury {see 
Proc. Geol. Assoc, vol. iv., 1876, p. 521, and vol. ix., p. 210). 
Presented by Professor T. Rupert Jones, f.r.s. 

Two rock specimens, probably Tertiary, one from East 
Africa, the other from Majunga, W. Madagascar. Presented 
by David Draper, Esq. 

A block of Middle Eocene rock in which the urchins 
described and figured by Dr. C. Gagel are found (Jahrb. 
Geol. Landesanst., xxiii., 1908, p. 505, pis. xxiv., xxv.). Pre- 
sented by The Director, Konigl. Geologische Landesanstalt, 
Berlin. 

A boulder from Cape Flora, Franz Josef Land, noticed in 
the donor's work, " A Thousand Daj'-s in the Arctic." Pre- 
sented by Captain F. G. Jackson. 

124. M 



164 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF TttR BRlTlSTT MUSEUM. 

B. — By Purchase. 

Mammalia. — Fifty-eight Mammalian remains, chiefly 
Edentata, collected by Handel T. Martin from the Santa 
Cruz Formation of Patagonia, including a skull of Borhyoena. 

A model of the skull and mandible of Palceomastodon and 
the same of Moeritherium,. 

Twelve plaster casts of foot-bones of Dinotherium from 
the Miocene of Bohemia, the originals in the Royal Bohemian 
Museum, Prague. 

A skull of Rhinoceros antiqiiifatis from the river-gravel 
of Peterborough. 

Two teeth of Entelodon from the Hempstead Beds, Isle 
of Wight. 

Mammalian remains from the Crag, including teeth of Sus, 
Goryphodon, Tapirus, Ruminants, Hipparion, Rhinoceros, 
Mastodon, Balcenodon, and Balcena ; also three rostra of 
Belemnoziphius. 

A portion of a skull of Bos longifrons from the tunnel 
under the Thames at Shadwell, fifty feet below the surface. 

Aves. — Vertebrae and limb-bones of Hesperornis regalis 
from the Cretaceous of Kansas, U.S.A. 

Reptilia. — A skeleton and two skulls, &c., of Telerpeton 
from the Trias of Elgin. 

One Ichthyosaurus quadriscissus from the Upper Lias, 
Holzmaden, Saxony, showing embrytfs in the body. 

One small Ichthyosaurus from the Lower Lias of Wilmcote, 
and other Ichthyosaurian remains, being part of the collection 
of the late R. F. Tomes, Esq., f.g.s. 

A skull of Teleidosaurus gaudryi, Collot ; the type 
specimen, described and figured in Mem. Acad. Dijon [4], 
vol. X. (1905), pis. i.-iii. From the Lower Jurassic, Saint- 
Seine-l'Abbaye, Cote-d'Or. 

A Dinosaurian tibia from the Kimmeridge Clay, Wey- 
mouth. 

A number of Reptilian remains from the Oxford Clay near 
Peterborough, namely :— One Teleosaurian head ; one skull 
of Dakosaurus ; associated head and a hundred and seventy- 
nine other bones, and part of stomach with gizzard stones, of 
Peloneustes ; associated head with a hundred and thirty- 
eight other bones of Thaumatosaurus. Collected by A. N. 
Leeds, Esq., f.g.s. 

Skeleton of Pteranodon, lacking head, from the Cretaceous 
of Kansas, U.S.A. 

Two pieces of Mosasaurian jaw and one Mosasaurian 
vertebra from the English Chalk. 

One Ichthyosaurian tooth from the Red Crag (derived 
fossil). 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 165 

-One fragment of Onychodus sigmoides and one 
Machcer acanthus peracutus from the Corniferous Limestone 
of New York, U.S.A. 

One Do'epanaspis gemuendenensis from the Lower De- 
vonian of Gmiinden. 

One head of Asterolepis, two specimens of Psammosteus 
tessellatus (one being part of the type specimen), and two 
shields and three pieces of Psammosteus taylori, from the 
Upper Old Red Sandstone of Nairn and Elgin. 

One specimen of Myriacanthus paradoxus irom. the hower 
Lias of Black Ven, Lyme Regis, showing dorsal fin-spine in 
association with the head. 

The hyomandibular and branchial arches of Leedsia prob- 
lematica from the Oxford Clay near Peterborough. Collected 
by A. N. Leeds, Esq. 

One Macropoma, four Physostomous fishes, two Acantho- 
pterygian fishes, one Plethodus, two groups of teeth of 
Ptychodus, and three Selachian teeth, from the English Chalk. 
Collected by G. E. Dibley, Esq., f.g.s., according to their 
zones. 

Specimens of Anogmius, Pachyrhizodus, and Saurodon, 
collected by C. H. Sternberg, from the Chalk of Kansas, 
U.S.A. 

One specimen of Trygon inuricatus from the Upper 
Eocene, Monte Bolca. 

Various fish-remains (Phyllodus, Acipenser, Notidanus, 
&c.) from the Red Crag. 

Mollusco,. — One Rhynchorthoceras from Sweden, and 
three Helicoceras from the Cretaceous of Japan. 

Seventy-eight Cephalopoda, five hundred and tw^enty-nine 
Gastropoda, and one hundred and five Lamellibranchia from 
the Carboniferous Limestone of Tournai, Belgium (Ad. Piret 
Collection). 

One Lima gigantea from the Lower Lias of Chadbury 
Gloucestershire. 

Six hundred and forty-one Cephalopoda and thirteen 
hundred and forty-five other Mollusca from the Jurassic 
Rocks, chiefly in Gloucestershire, being part of the collection 
of the late E. Witchell, Esq., f.g.s., and including a hundred 
and sixteen type and figured specimens. 

Six hundred and sixty-seven Cephalopoda, four hundred 
and seventy-nine Gastropoda, and seven hundred and forty- 
three Lamellibranchia, from the Jurassic Rocks, chiefly in the 
neighbourhood of Evesham, being part of the collection of the 
late R. F. Tomes, Esq., f.g.s. 

Sixty Cephalopoda, one Gastropod, and one Lamellibranch, 
collected by Prof. E. Koken from the Permo-Carboniferous 
Rocks of the Salt Range. 



166 ACCOUNTS, ETC. OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Twenty-three Permian, and eight Jurassic Lamellibranchia 
from various Russian localities. 

Sixty-seven Ammonites and Belemnites from English 
Corallian and Oxfordian rocks. 

Eleven Mollusca from the Lower Cretaceous (Urgonian) 
from Orgon, Bouches-du-Rhone. 

Fifty two Cephalopoda, ten Lamellibranchia, and twelve 
Gastropoda from the Upper Albian of Savoy, collected by 
the eminent geologist De Luc. 

Twelve Ammonites and Nautiloids collected by G. E. 
Dibley, Esq., F.G.S., from definite zones in the English Chalk. 

A coloured plaster cast of the type-specimen of the 
largest known Ammonite (diam. 6 ft. 8 in.), Pachy discus 
sepjpenradensis, from the Upper Cretaceous of Westphalia. 

Forty-three fossil Invertebrata, chiefly Mollusca, from the 
Cretaceous of Catumbella, Angola. 

One fine specimen of Pecten cinctus, from the Neocomian 
of Claxby, Lincolnshire. 

One Nautilus from the London Clay at South Kensington 
Station, 80 feet deep. 

One Cassidaria and one Chrysodomus from the Red 
Crag. 

Arthropoda. — Eleven Trilobites from the Ordovician of 
France. 

Two models of Eurypterus Jischeri, and two of Hugh- 
milleria socialis. 

Three specimens of Hugkmilleria sncialis from the 
Upper Silurian, New York, U.S.A. 

Nine electrotypes of type and figured specimens of Coal 
Measure Arthropods in the Bristol Museum. 

One Trilobite from the collection made by Prof. E. Koken, 
in the Permo-Carboniferous of the Salt Range. 

Thirty-five Crustacea from the Jurassic Rocks of Glou- 
cestershire, being part of the collection of the late E. 
Witchell, Esq., F.G.S. 

One Crustacean from the Stonesfield Slate. 

Thirty-six Decapod Crustacea, and two hundred and 
sixteen Phyllopoda, Ostracoda, and Insecta from the Jurassic 
Rocks of Western and South-Western England, being part of 
the collection of the late R. F. Tomes, Esq., f.g.s. 

Echinoderma. — Two Lepidocentrus from the Lower 
Devonian of Bundenbach, one Paloechinus from the Lower 
Carboniferous, Vise, Belgium, and two Cidarids from the 
Upper Trias of the Tyrol. 

Crinoids from the Carboniferous Limestone of Bundorran, 
Ireland. 

Two hundred and thirty-three Echinoderma from the 
Lower Carboniferous Limestone of Tournai, Belgium ( Ad. 
Piret Collection). 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 167 

A Crinoid from the Carboniferous of Roscobie, N.B. 

Thirteen Crinoidea, collected by Prof. E. Koken from the 
Permo-Carboniferous of the Salt Range. 
One Pentacrinus from the Lov/er Lias. 
Echini from the Pea-grit of Andoversford, Gloucestershire. 
One Clypeus from the Inferior Oolite. 

Ninety-six Echinoderma from the Jurassic Rocks of the 
West of England, being part of the collection of the late 
E. Witchell, Esq., F.G.S. 

Fifty-two Echinoidea, thirteen Asteroidea, and a hun- 
dred and thirty-two Crinoid fragments from the Jurassic 
Rocks of the West and South-West of England, being part of 
the collection of the late R. F. Tomes, Esq., f.g.s. 

Twenty Echinoidea from the Upper Albian of Savoy, 
collected by the eminent geologist De Luc. 

Brachiopoda. — Three hundred and one Brachiopoda from 
the Lower Carboniferous of Tournai, Belgium (Ad. Piret 
Collection). 

Brachiopoda from the Carboniferous Limestone of Bun- 
dorran. Ireland. 

Four hundred Brachiopoda, collected by Prof. E. Koken 
from the Permo-Carboniferous of the Salt Range. 

Eleven Permian Brachiopoda from the Jurassic Rocks of 
various Russian localities. 

Thirty-four Brachiopoda from the Bradford Clay of Creep 
Wood Quarry, Bradford-on-Avon. 

Four hundred and sixty-eight Brachiopoda from the 
Jurassic rocks of the West and South-West of England, being 
part of the collection of the late E. Witchell, Esq., f.g.s. 

Three hundred and forty Brachiopoda from the Jurassic 
rocks of the West and South-West of England, being part of 
the collection of the late R. F. Tomes, Esq., f.g.s. 

Twelve Brachiopoda from the Upper Albian of Savoy, 
collected by the eminent geologist De Luc. 

Vermes. — Thirty-one Annelids from the Jurassic Rocks of 
the West and South-West of England, being part of the 
collection of the late R. F. Tomes, Esq., F.G.S. 

One Annelid from the Jurassic of the West of England, 
a specimen from the collection of the late E. Witchell, Esq., 

F.G.S. 

Twenty-four Annelida from the Carboniferous Limestone 
of Tournai, Belgium (Ad. Piret Collection). 

Polyzoa. — Twelve Polyzoa from the Devonian of Indiana 
and Ohio, U.S.A. 

Eighty-six Polyzoa from the Jurassic rocks of the West 
and South-West of England, being part of the collection of 
of the late R. F. Tomes, Esq., F.G.S. 



168 ACCOUNTS, ETC. OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Ten Polyzoa from the Pea-grit of Andoversford, Glouces- 
tershire. 

Twelve Polyzoa from the Jurassic Rocks of the West and 
South-West of England, being part of the collection of the 
late E. Witchell, Esq., f.g.s. 

A hundred and seventy-five Polyzoa from the Chalk of 
Belgium, Kent, and Surrey. 

Anthozoa. — Forty-three Corals from the Devonian of 
Indiana and Ohio, U.S.A. 

Three hundred and three Anthozoa from the Lower 
Carboniferous of Tournai, Belgium (Ad. Piret Collection). 

Corals from the Carboniferous Limestone of Bundorran, 
Ireland. 

Forty-seven Anthozoa collected by Prof. E. Koken from 
the Permo-Carboniferous of the Salt Range. 

Four thousand eight hundred Jurassic Corals, five hun- 
dred and eighty-five Cretaceous Corals, and four hundred and 
eighty-four Corals from other formations, being the most 
important part of the collection of the late R. F. Tomes, Esq., 
F.G.S.. and containing a hundred and eighty-nine type and 
figured specimens. 

Three Jurassic Corals from the collection of the late 
E. W. Witchell, Esq., f.g.s. 

Three Corals from the Upper Albian of Savoy, collected 
by the eminent geologist De Luc. 

Porifera. — Twenty Porif era from the Lower Carboniferous 
Limestone of Tournai, Belgium (Ad. Piret Collection). 

Sponges from the Pea-grit of Andoversford, Gloucester- 
shire. 

A specimen of Stachyspongia from the Chalk Marl. 

Protozoa. — One Foraminifer, being part of the collection 
of Prof. E. Koken ; from the Permo-Carboniferous of the Salt 
Range. 

Plantce. — A model of the Carboniferous Plant Crossotheca. 
Five Microscope-sections of the coal plants, Cordaites 
sutclifi, and Medullosa, &c. 

Fossil fruit and wood from the Red Crag, Suff'olk. 

Tracks. — Seven Bilobites from the Ordovician of France. 



C. — By Exchange. 

Pisces. — Twenty-one coloured plaster casts of plates of 
Bothriolepis major from the Upper Old Red Sandstone of 
the Alves district, Elgin. From the Royal Scottish Museum, 
Edinburgh, 

Mollusca. — About 150 Tertiary Mollusca from Borneo and 
140 Post-Pliocene Mollusca from tiava. From the Geological 
]\iuseum. University of Leyden. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 169 

Twelve specimens of four species of Gastropods from the 
English Lias. From L. Richardson, Esq, f.g.s. 



The total acquisitions are 


as follov 


^s : — 


A.— Veetebrata : 






By Donation - 


- 


- 284 


„ Purchase 


- 


- 263 


,, Exchange - 


- 


21 

568 


B. — Invertebeata : 






By Donation - 


- 


- 2,612 


„ Purchase - 


- 


- 14,205 


„ Exchange - 


- 


- 302 
— 17,119 


C— Plants : 






By Donation - 


- 


32 


„ Purchase - 


- 


8 
40 


D. —Rock specimens : 






By Donation - 


- 


4 


„ Purchase 


- 


- - 7 



11 



Total Acquisitions for 1905 = 17,738 



VIII. — Visitors and Students. 

The number of visits paid to the Department by students 
and other persons for tTie purpose of consultation or study 
during 1905 was 4,968. 

IX. — Lectures and Demonstrations. 

Five parties were received in the Galleries of the 
Department of Geology, and demonstrations were given as 
follows : — 

March 11. — The Geologists' Association (61 members) ; 
by Dr. Woodward, Dr. Andrews, and Mr. Crick. 

September 30. — The St. Andrews Social Union of 
Stockwell (17 members) ; by Dr. Andrews. 

November 11. — The Battersea Field Club and the 
Selborne Society (47 members) ; by Dr. Andrews. 

November 25. — The London Pupil Teachers' Association 
(100 members) ; by Dr. Bather. 

December 16. — The Croydon Natural History Society 
(14 members) ; by Dr. Woodward. 

Arthur Smith Woodward,. 



170 ACCOUNTS, ETC. OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Mineralogy. 

Research. 

During the year the crystallographie and chemical investi- 
gation of new and rare minerals, belonging to the Sulphide 
Division, from the Binnenthal, Switzerland, has been con- 
tinued. In this connection crystals of smithite, hutchinsonite, 
trechmannite, marrite and lengenbachite have been crystallo- 
graphically and optically studied ; and quantitative chemical 
analyses have been made of smithite and hutchinsonite, one 
result of which has been to show that the rare element 
thallium is an important constituent of the latter mineral. 
In the Halide Division the new mineral paratacamite has 
been further crystallographically examined and the nature of 
its complex twinning discussed. In the Silicate Division an 
investigation has been in progress into the range of variation 
of the physical characters of the garnets, and for this purpose 
the refractive indices and specific gravities of various faceted 
stones have been determined. 

A collection of minerals from German East Africa, includ- 
ing a fine specimen of phenacite, has been crystallographically 
investigated. 

Various minerals (including specimens of andorite,stannite, 
tourmaline and wolframite) from Bolivia have also been ex- 
amined and determined. 

Crystallographie measurements have been incidentally 
made on various other specimens, including albite, anatase, 
apatite, blende, calaverite, caracolite, ilmenite, krennerite, 
parisite, seligmannite, sylvanite, tennantite and^turnerite. 

The petrographical examination of the 9C0 rock- specimens 
collected in the course of the "Discovery " Antarctic Expedi- 
tion has been in progress. In this connection about .300 thin 
slices have been microscopically examined, six quantitative 
chemical analyses have been made, and specimens of salts 
found on Antarctic ice have been qualitatively analysed. 

Specimens of dundasite from North Wales, a mineral 
which hitherto has been found only in Tasmania, have been 
examined and determined ; and a chemical formula for the 
mineral has been for the first time determined by a quantita- 
tive chemical analysis. 

In the chemical laboratory 12 complete quantitative 
analyses have been made, viz., of smithite (2), hutchinsonite 
(2), Antarctic rocks (6), a doubtful mineral from Ceylon 
containing rare-earths (\), and dundasite (1). Further, 34 
doubtful minerals have been qualitatively analysed. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINEEALOGY, 171 

Publications. 

A new edition of the " Students' Index to the Collection of 
Minerals " has been prepared and passed through the press, 
and the following paper has been published in the " Mineral- 
ogical Magazine and Journal of the Mineralogical Society ": — 

" An improved form of Refractometer " : by G. F. Herbert 
Smith, M.A., F.G.S. 

Miscellaneous. 

Slip-catalogues have been made of the large series of 
specimens of silver and gold, and labels have been written for 
all the specimens. For this purpose all available information 
respecting each specimen has been collected on the corre- 
sponding slip and the history traced as far as possible. In 
connection with this work a slip-index has been made of all 
the specimens purchased at Heuland's Sales before 1837 ; the 
collections of silver and copper have been entirely re-arranged ; 
and the more valuable specimens of gold and platinum have 
been weighed. Further, all the specimens of gold, silver 
and copper, bearing aiSxed labels referring only to special 
catalogues, have now been entered in the General Register. 

Experiments have been made relative to the best method 
of attaching the register-numbers to specimens, and gummed 
tickets, partly printed, have been designed. 

The incorporation of recent acquisitions has necessitated 
the re-arrangement and expansion of several species (pyro- 
morphite, garnet, blende, &c.) in the cases and drawers. 

Seventeen cubes of old drawers (8 drawers to a cube) which 
were too shallow for mineral specimens have been replaced by 
others containing 5 drawers to a cube. 

Large Index-labels for species have been designed, printed, 
framed and fixed to the columns in the gallery. 

The Catalogue of scientific instruments and apparatus in 
the Department has been revised and amplified. 

Assistance has been given in the revision of the proofs of 
the Catalogue of the Museum Library. 

Seventy-two boxes or parcels, containing about 1,300 
mineral specimens, have been received, unpacked, and 
examined ; eighty-five boxes or parcels have been packed 
and despatched. 

280 thin slices of rocks have been prepared and two 
meteoric irons have been cut. 

Departmental Library. 

To the Departmental Library have been added continua- 
tions of 29 periodicals (in 387 parts), 59 volumes of separate 
works, 66 pamphlets and parts of works, and 26 mining and 
survey reports; of these, 9 periodicals (in 118 parts), 11 



172 ACCOUNTS, ETC. OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

volumes of separate works, GO pamphlets and parts of works, 
and all the mining and survey reports were acquired by pre- 
sentation or transfer. All of them, including 730 plates, 
have been collated, registered and stamped. 

Students. 

The number of visits recorded as made to the Department 
for the purposes of consultation or study is 994. 

The Gallery being no longer reserved on particular days 
of the week for use by students, and study-series having 
been so arranged as to be directly accessible to the public, 
and so labelled as to render reference to the staff for informa- 
tion thereon almost completely unnecessary, it has become 
difficult to distinguish, for statistical purposes, " Students" 
of minerals from ordinary " Visitors," and stress can no 
longer be laid on the distinction. 

Demonstrations. 
A demonstration on Precious Stones and Meteorites was 
given by Dr. Prior to twenty-five members of the London 
Pupil Teachers' Association on November 25. 

Exchanges. 

Exchanges of specimens have been made with Dr. H. A. 
Ward, of Chicago, and Dr. F. Krantz, of Bonn. 

Accessions. 
1,083 specimens have been acquired, namely : — 

388 minerals, 681 rocks, and 14 meteorites. All of them 
have been registered, numbered, labelled, and incorporated 
with the Collection. 

The more important of them are as follows : — 

Minerals. 
By Presentation : 

A large mass of native copper coated with native silver, 
weighing 101 lb., from Bolivia; by F. Avelino Aramayo, Esq. 

A collection of tin-ores and other minerals from Bolivia : 
by M. Roberts, Esq. 

A large specimen of babel -quartz, from Breage, Cornwall : 
by A. Russell, Esq. 

Dundasite, from Welsh Foxdale mine, Caernarvonshire : 
by H. F. Collins, Esq. 

Beryl, molybdenite, thorianite and other minerals contain- 
ing rare earths, from Ceylon : by A. K. Coomaraswamy, Esq. 

A large specimen of columbite, from Norway : by F. A. 
Blair, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINEKALOGY. 173 

Specimens of tantalite from Australia : by J. P. de Castro, 
Esq., and by W. F. Grace, Esq. 

Tin-ores from the Transvaal : by G. A. Troye, Esq., and by 
D. Draper, Esq. 

Specimens of corundum, spinel, sodalite, &;c., from India, 
and of rubies, from N. Carolina : by Prof. J. W. Judd, c.B., 

F.R.S. 

Rubies, spinel and lapis lazuli, from Burma, the material 
described by C. Barrin^ton Brown, Esq., and Prof. J. W. 
Judd : by H.M. Secretary of State for India, through Prof. 
J. W. Judd, C.B., F.R.S. 

Opals, from Queensland : by T. C. Wollaston, Esq. 

Faceted zircons : by E. Hopkins, Esq. 

Monazite, fine crystals with anatase on quartz: by the 
Rev. J. M. Gordon. 

By Purchase : 

Fine crystals of whewellite, from Saxony. 

An exceptionally large crystal of seligmannite and a 
fine specimen of the new mineral bowmanite, from the 
Binnenthal. 

Amethyst with basal plane and distorted quartz crystals, 
from the collection of the late Prof. Damour. 

Crystals of hellandite, mica and molybdenite, from 
Norway. 

Of fine specimens from the United States may be men- 
tioned: — Amethyst crystals in parallel growth on smoky quartz 
from Montana, diaspore and datolite from Massachusetts, 
calcite crystals impregnated with sand from S. Dakota, zincite 
crystals from New Jersey, and a large crystal of riebeckite 
from Colorado. 

Specimens of copper-glance and copper-pyrites ; also 
crystals of bertrandite, a mineral new to Great Britain : 
from Cornwall. 

Crystals of danburite on axinite, and of wolframite, 
pseudomorphous after scheelite, from Japan. 

The following names added to the Museum List were 
previously not represented by specimens in the Collection . — 

Astrolite, bowmanite, hutchinsonite, keweenawite, lengen- 
bachite, marrite, mohawk-whitneyite, paratacamite, smithite, 
stilpnochlorane, trechmannite. 

Rocks. 
By Presentation : 
A collection of rock-specimens and ores from the copper 
mines of Bogoslovsk, Russia : by E. Stratonovitch, Esq., 
through W. H. Shockley, Esq. 

A small collection of alkaline rocks from Victoria, 
Australia : by G. B. Pritchard, Esq. 



174 ACCOUNTS, ETC. OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A collection of rock-specimens representing well-known 
formations in the Transvaal : by Dr. F. H. Hatch. 

A collection of rock-specimens from Angola : by R. J. 
Cuninghame, Esq. 

A series of crystalline limestones and of gneisses and 
granulites from the ruby-mining district of Burma; by 
H.M. Secretary of State for India, through Prof. J. W. Judd, 

C.B., F.R.S. 

A series of specimens of the dolomitic rocks of the 
southern Tyrol : by Prof. E. W. Skeats. 

By Purchase : 

A series of 276 typical rock-specimens from the Swiss Alps, 
collected by Prof. C. Schmidt. 

A series of 69 remarkable rocks from various localities. 

A specimen of orbicular granite from Argentina. 

Meteorites. 

By Presentation : 

Yenshigahara, Japan ; two pieces weighing 81 grams and 
34 grams respectively : by Dr. C. Ishikowa. 

Tanokami-yama, Japan ; a slice weighing 178 grams : by 
Dr. C. Ishikowa. 

Echigo, Japan; fell June 12, 1837: a piece weighing 
34 grams : by Dr. C. Ishikowa. 

Eukutomi, Japan; a piece weighing 225 grams: by Dr. 
C. Ishikowa. 

Marimba District, British Central Africa ; a ston ; 
weighing 333 grams : by A. J. Swann, Esq. 

By Exchange : 
Minas Geraes, Brazil ; a slice weighing 62 grams. 

Shelburne, Canada ; fell August 13, 1904 ; a slice weighiii<.; 
80 grams. 

By Purchase : 

Billings, Missouri ; a slice weighing 633 grams. 

Shelburne, Canada ; fell August 13, 1904 ; a piece weighing 
1,711 grams. 

Warbreccan, Queensland; stones weighing 31,640 gram;' 
(69 lb.), 29,140 grams (64 lb.), and 443 grams respectively. 

Santiago, Chili ; a piece weighing 301 grams. 

Meteorites of which the names are italicized belong to 
falls hitherto unrepresented in the Museum Collection. 

L. Fletcher. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 175 



Department of Botany. 

I. — ArrangefYient and Conservation. 

During the past year 19,048 specimens, consisting of 
13,498 Flowering Plants, 268 Vascular Cryptogams, 525 
Mosses, 53 Hepatics, 1,503 Lichens, 46 Algse, and 3,155 
Fungi, have been mounted and incorporated with the 
Herbarium. 

Flowering Plants. — Portions of the following collections 
have been laid out and incorporated with the general Her- 
barium — Dr. Hassler's collection from Paraguay, Father 
Hugh Scallan's collection from Central China, Rev. Urban 
Faurie's collection from Japan, and a collection of Philippine 
plants from Mr. E. Merrill. Dr. Bagshawe's collection from 
Uganda has been incorporated; and a collection from 
Rhodesia, by Mr. Fred EjT^les, has also been determined and 
incorporated. 

In the division Polypetalse various collections have been 
laid out and incorporated ; the principal additions being to 
the orders Rosacese, Leguminosse and Cniciferse. The Poly- 
petalse of a collection from Mongolia by Mr. C. Campbell 
have been identified. The order Chailletiacese has been 
re-arranged, and the South American Anonacese have been 
revised with reference to Dr. R. E. Fries's papers. 

In the division Gamopetalse, specimens have been laid 
out and incorporated in connection with the orders Rubiacese, 
Compositse, Convolvulacese, Solanaceso, Bignoniacese, and 
Gesneracese, and work of re-arrangement or revision has 
been done in the orders Rubiacese, Ericaceae, Convolvulaceae 
(especially tropical African and American), Scrophulari- 
acese, Selaginese, and Labiatse, and in the genera Eupatoriuw,, 
Abelia, Heliotropium and Calceolaria. 

In the Apetalse a large number of Euphorbiaceae have 
been laid out and incorporated, as have also collections from 
Malaya (by Ridley), British Columbia (by Shaw), Mexico 
(by Pringle), and Australia (by Statter and Podenzana). A 
collection from Uganda, by Dr. Bagshawe, has been worked 
out and incorporated, and a .small collection from Mongolia 
by Mr. C. Campbell, has been determined. Some time was 
devoted to the identification and revision of tropical African 
Loranthacese. 

In the Monocotyledons various collections have been laid 
out and incorporated, including plants from Angola, collected 
by Gossweiler, from South Africa, by Schlechter, from the 
West Indies, by Curtiss, and from Australia, by Podenzana ; 
also a number of Indian and Malayan palms. Work of 
re-arrangement or revision has been done in the orders 



176 ACCOUNTS, ETC. OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Liliacese (especially the genera Allium, Fritillaria, and 
others), Juncacese, Xyridacese, and Eriocaulaceee. Some 
time was devoted to the determination of collections made 
in Tibet, including those of Major Younghusband, and in 
Central China by Father Hugh Scallan. 

Work of determination and re-arrangement has been done 
in connection with Francis Bauer's drawings of Orchids, and 
Major-General Hardwicke's collection of drawings of Indian 
plants. 

Ferns. — The plants of various collections have been laid 
out and incorporated in the general series, including a collec- 
tion from Japan (by Faurie) ; and collections from the 
Falkland Islands, Tierra del Fuego, California, Tahiti, China, 
and Tibet, have been determined. The following genera have 
been in part revised and re-arranged — Polypodiwni, Fteris, 
and Aspleniitm (Philippine Islands species). 

Mosses. — The plants of various collections have been 
incorporated in the general series, including Menzies' typos 
of Polytrichacese. The genera Leucophanes, Isopterygium 
(in part), and Ectropothecium (in part) have been revised 
and re-arranged, and the plants collected by Mr. H. N. Ridley 
on Christmas Island have been determined. 

Algce. — The genera Delesseria and Laminaria have been 
revised and re-arranged ; and the plants collected by the 
British and Scottish Antarctic Expeditions, and by Mr. Ridley 
on Christmas Island, have been determined. 

Fungi.— Th.Q British Uredinese have been revised and 
re-arranged according to the monographs by Plowright and 
Klebahn, and material from numerous collections has been 
incorporated. The North American Uredinese of Arthur and 
Holway have been incorporated, and all outstanding material 
has been incorporated in the genus Uromyces, and to some 
extent in the genus Puccinia. 

Lichens. — Progress has been made in the work of labelling 
and arranging the British Lichens. 

In the exhibition series the labels have been revised, and 
numerous specimens inserted. Some progress has been made 
in the representation of the Dicotyledons, and several cases, 
including that containing the Sowerby models of Fungi, 
have been cleaned. The pedestal cases of British Fungi have 
been re-arranged, and the final sheets added, and progress has 
been made in the selection of material and preparation of 
labels for the case of British Lichens. An exhibition illus- 
trating the History of Plant- Classification by means of 
books and illustrations has been placed in the public gallery 
and fine specimens of the vegetable sheep (Raoulia), from 
New Zealand, and of Adenium, a remarkable dry-country 
plant, from Somaliland, have been mounted and exhibited. 

Some time has been devoted to the exhibition illustratin • 
British trees in the Central Hall. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 177 

A large photograph of an orchid, Phalcenopsis Schil- 
leriana, presented by the Hon. Walter Rothschild, has been 
framed and placed above the entrance to the Herbarium. 



ll.-^Publications. 

The official publications comprise Part III. of the Illus- 
trations of the Australian Botany of Cook's Voyage, by 
Mr. Britten, and a new edition of the Guide to the British 
Mycetozoa by Mr. Arthur Lister. 

The following publications relating to the collections and 
work of the Department have also appeared : — 

The Botany of the Anglo-German Uganda Boundary 
Commission, by Messrs. E. G. Baker, Spencer Moore, and A. B. 
Rendle. (Journal of Linnean Society.) 

Mr. Eyles's Rhodesian plants, by Messrs. E. G. Baker, 
Spencer Moore, and A. B. Rendle. (Journal of Botany.) 

Flora of Tropical Africa. (Edited by Sir W. T. Thiselton- 
Dyer.) Convolvulacese. By Dr. Rendle (with Mr. J. G. 
Baker). 

Note on Liparis longipes Lindl. By Dr. Rendle. (Journal 
of Botany.) 

Classification of Plants. By Dr. Rendle. (Journal of 
Botany.) 

Graham's Mexican Plants. By Mr. Britten. (Journal of 
Botany.) 

Notes on Cardamine, By Mr. Baker. (Journal of 
Botany.) 

Alabastra Diversa, XII. By Mr. Spencer Moore. (Journal 
of Botany.) 

New South African Plants, By Mr. Spencer Moore. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

African Rubiacese. By Mr. Spencer Moore. (Journal of 
Botany.) 

Penicillus and Rhipocephalus. By Mr. and Mrs. Gepp. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

Antarctic Algse (in two parts). By Mr. and Mrs. Gepp. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

Atlantic Algse of the " Scotia" Expedition. By Mr. and 
Mrs, Gepp. (Journal of Botany.) 

Note on Rhipidosiphon. By Mr. and Mrs. Gepp. (Journal 
of Botany.) 

Christmas Island Cryptogams. By Mr. and Mrs. Gepp. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

Fertilization in Sphcerotheca. By Mr. Blackman and Miss 
H. Eraser. (Annals of Botany.) 



178 ACCOUNTS, ETC. OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Further Studies in the Uredinere. By Mr. Blackman and 
Miss H. Fraser. (Annals of Botany.) 

On the Sexuality and Development of the Ascocarp of 
Humaria granulata Quel, By Mr. Blackman and Miss H. 
Fraser. (Proc. Roy. Soc.) 

Fungi new to Britain. By Miss A. Lorrain Smith (with 
Mr. Garleton Rea). (Trans. Brit. Mycolog. Soc.) 

III. — Exchanges of Duplicates. 

Exchanges have been effected with the Royal Botanic 
Museum, Berlin, the Hofmuseum, Vienna, the Botanic 
Museum, Zurich, the Botanic Garden of the Royal Academy of 
Science, Stockholm, the Bureau of Government Laboratories, 
Manila, the Botanic Gardens, Sydney, Mr. T. W. Naylor 
Beckett, Dr. C. A. M. Lindman, and Dr. R. Schlechter. 

IV. — Loan of Si^ecimens. 

Specimens, mainly undetermined, have been lent as 
follows : — 35 specimens of Nepenthes to Professor John 
Macfarlane, University of Pennsylvania, U.S.A., ; 11 speci- 
mens of Bambusese to Sir Dietrich Brandis, working at the 
Royal Gardens, Kew; 9 specimens of Calceolaria to Dr. 
F. Kriinzlin, Berlin ; 30 specimens of Malayan Impatiens to 
Sir Joseph Hooker. 

In every case the specimens have been returned in good 
condition, accompanied by determinations and valuable notes. 

V. — Departmental Library. 

The additions during the past year have been, by donation, 
30 volumes, 86 pamphlets ; by purchase, 117 volumes, 2 
pamphlets, in all 147 volumes, 88 pamphlets. These include 
23 periodicals, in 141 parts, presented, and 76 periodicals, in 
168 parts, purchased, in all 99 periodicals in 759 parts. 83 
volumes have been bound. Progress has been made with 
the classification and arrangement for binding of the large 
collection of notes and drawings by R. A. Salisbury. 

VI. — Acquisitions. 

The following additions have been made to the collections 
by presentation : — 

170 Phanerogams and 80 Cryptogams from Malaya, from 
H. N. Ridley, Esq. ; 48 Phanerogams from the Shan States, 
from Major C. H. Melville ; 4 Phanerogams from India, from 
Dr. T. Cooke ; 45 Phanerogams and 20 Cryptogams from Hong- 
kong, from S. T. Dunn, Esq. ; 188 Phanerogams from Eastern 
Mongolia, from C. W. Campbell, Esq. ; 1,954 Phanerogams 
and 136 Cryptogams from Western China, collected by E. H. 
Wilson, from Messrs. Veitch ; 69 Phanerogams from Rhodesia, 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 17^ 

from E. R. Sawer, Esq. ; 21 Phanerogams from Northern 
Nigeria, from Dr. Karl W. Kumm ; 3 specimens of Convol- 
vulacese from Northern Nigeria, from Capt. G. B. Gosling; 
122 Phanerogams and 8 Cryptogams from Angola, from J. 
Gossweiler, Esq. ; 153 Phanerogams and 3 Cryptogams from 
the Transvaal, from J. Burtt Davy, Esq. ; 106 Phanerogams 
from the Uganda Protectorate, from Dr. A. G. Bagshawe ; 
3 specimens of Compositse from South Africa, from Dr. H. 
Bolus ; 4 specimens of Coniferse from Mexico, from George 
Shaw, Esq. ; 11 specimens of Violets from the United States, 
from Homer D. Howse, Esq. ; 6 Phanerogams from California, 
from Dr. Davidson ; 24 specimens of Sarracenia from Dr. 
J. M. McFarlane, Philadelphia ; 249 Phanerogams and 17 
Cryptogams, collected in Mexico, 1827-9, by G. J. Graham, 
from Mrs. Howgrave Graham ; 36 specimens of Podostemacese 
from A. W. Bartlett, Esq. ; 401 Phanerogams and 17 Crypto- 
gams from Chili, from G. F. Scott Elliot, Esq. ; 7 Flowering 
plants and 13 Cryptogams from Tierra del Fuego, from Capt. 
Crawshay ; 41 Phanerogams and 13 Cryptogams from the 
Falkland Islands, from Mrs. Vallentin ; 5 specimens of Azalea 
critically determined, from Herr J. Valckenier Suringar ; 
specimens of cultivated plants from Messrs. A. Perry (8), 
James O'Brien, Esq. (20), Walter Ledger, Esq. (9), and E. A. 
Bowles, Esq. (16) ; a section of Yew from the Red Bog, near 
Ballyfin, Queens Co., Ireland, from R. D. Cole, Esq. ; a leaf 
of Ceratozamia mexicana and a specimen of Eohallium 
Elaterium for exhibition, from the Director, Royal Gardens, 
Kew ; and 7 specimens of Characese for exhibition, from 
Messrs. H. and J. Groves ; 100 Ferns from the South Sea 
Islands and New Zealand, from Commander G. G. Webber ; 

3 Ferns from the Pyrenees, from C. E. Salmon, Esq. ; 37 
Mosses from Fernando Po, from Mr. W. S. Sherrin ; 13 Aiosses 
from the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, from M. J. Cardot ; 
24 Hepatics from Jamaica, from i^lexander W. Evans, Esq. ; 

4 new marine Algse from the Faroe Islands and Norway, 
from Herr H. G. Simmons; 24 tubes of fresh-water Algse, 
collected by I. H. Burkill, Esq., from Lt.-Col. D. Prain ; 
photographs of 7 types of Japanese Sargassa in Herb. Harvey 
from Dr. E. Perceval Wright ; 33 Lichens from Bombay, from 
Rev. E. Blatter; one or two specimens from Sir Daniel 
Morris, Miss Copland, J. W. O'Dell, Esq., F. Garry, Esq., 
Lieut. Rayner Cole, Franklin White, Esq., Dr. Britton, Dr. 
Morrison, Rev. R. P. Murray, W. Fawcett, Esq., Rev. J. 
Gerard, C. Kerr Wilson, Esq., Miss Anna Vickers, and J. T. 
Bennett -Poe, Esq ; a drawing of a group of plants by M. van 
Huysum, from F. Jus ten, Esq. ; and a large photograph of 
FhalcEnopsis Schilleriana for exhibition, from the Hon. 
Walter Rothschild. 

The additions to the British Herbarium by presentation 
have been : — 90 specimens from C. E. Salmon, Esq. ; 160 
fvpecimens from Rev. E. S. Marshall ; photograph of wild 
K 124. N 



180 ACCOUNTS, ETC. OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

cherry tree showing " Witches' Broom," from Jas. Saunders, 
Esq., 34 specimens from Rev. H. J. Riddelsdell ; a large col- 
lection of Rubi collected by the Revs. W. H. Purchas and 
A. Ley, from Rev. A. Ley ; 3 specimens from Miss E. 
Armitage ; 23 specimens from G. C. Druce, Esq. ; 28 speci- 
mens from A. Bennett, Esq. ; 3 specimens from J. C. Melvill, 
Esq. ; 4 specimens of willows from Rev. E. F. Linton ; 5 
cryptogams from T. E. Belcher, Esq. ; 9 rare Hepaticse from 
Symers M. Macvicar, Esq. ; 3 Fungi and 2 books of manu- 
script descriptions of British Tuberoidese and Discomycetes, 
from Worthington G. Smith, Esq. ; large specimens of Lamin- 
aria from Loch Eil, from Henry A. Hammond, Esq. ; and 
large specimens from the Scilly Isles, from Messrs. C. B. Maggs 
and R. H. Banting; about 700 marine Algse, mostly from the 
West coast of Scotland, from Monsignor Canon Bernard 
Ward ; and single or two specimens from Prof. D. Oliver, 
Mrs. Gregory, W. P. Hiern, Esq., C. T. Green, Esq., H. W. 
Pugsley, Esq., E. Holland, Esq., Dr. C. B. Plowright, and 
Canon H. W. Lett. 

The following additions have been made by exchange of 
duplicates : — 487 specimens from South America and Mexico, 
-and specimens of African Acanthacese, from the Royal 
Botanic Museum, Berlin, through Dr. Engler ; 2,333 Phanero- 
gams and 227 Cryptogams of the Philippine Islands, from 
the Bureau of Government Laboratories, Manila, through 
Prof. Elmer D. Merrill ; 137 specimens from Brazil,, collected 
by Malme, from the Botanic Garden of the Royal Academy 
of Science, Stockholm, through Prof. AVittrock ; 127 Phanero- 
gams and 9 Cryptogams, chiefly collected by R. Schlechter 
in South Africa, from the Botanic Museum, Zurich, through 
Prof. Hans Schinz ; Kryptogamse Exsiccatse, Cent, x, xi, from 
the Vienna Hofmuseum ; 123 specimens, mainly Orchids, 
from New Guinea, from Dr. R. Schlechter ; 64 New Zealand 
Mosses, from T. W. Nayior Beckett ; 138 Mosses and Hepatics 
of Brazil, from Dr. C. A. M. Lindman, 

The principal purchases during the year were : — 1,273 
Phanerogams and 39 Cryptogams from Paraguay, from 
Dr. Sassier; 881 Phanerogams and 84 Cryptogams from 
Japan, Corea and Formosa, from Rev. Urban Faurie ; 200 
Phanerogams and 17 Cryptogams from Siam, collected by 
Dr. Hosseus, from Dr. Wilms ; 176 Phanerogams and 
21 Cryptogams, " Iter Persicum alterum, 1902 " from J. 
Bornmiiller ; 537 South African plants collected by R. 
Schlechter, from Dr.Loesener ; 590 specimens from Cameroons 
collected by G. Zenker, from Dr. E. Gilg ; 445 Phanerogams 
and 73 Cryptogams from British Columbia, from C. H. Shaw ; 
800 specimens from South California, from L. R. Abrams ; 
460 specimens from North Mexico, from G. B. Metcalfe; 
Herb. Normale, Cent, xliv, from Dorfler ; Flora Stiriaca 
exsiccata, Cent, i, from Hayek; 117 specimens Herb. 
-Dendrologicum (Fascicle v), from Koehne ; 82 specimens 



DEPABTMENT OF BOTANY. 181 

Carices Exsiccatse (Fascicles xii-xiiA.) and Gramineae 
Exsiccatse (Fascicles xvii, xviii) from Kneucker- 25 British 
Hieracia (Fascicle vii.), from Kev. W. R. Linton. 

125 Cryptogams of Germany, Austria and Switzerland, 
from Migula ; 160 Muscineae of Cardiganshire, from Painter ; 
50 Mosses of the Malay Archipelago, from Fleischer ; 200 
European Hepaticse, from Schiifner; 58 Mosses and 136 
Fungi of Brazil, from Ule ; 75 North American Algse, from 
Collins.. Holden, and Setchell ; 250 Fungi Imperfecti, from 
Kabat and BuJDak ; 20 Ohio Fungi, from Kellerman ; 14 
Microscope Preparations of Micro-Fungi, from Miss A. L. 
Smith; 150 Micro-Fungi, from Vestergren ; 50 Fungi Selecti, 
from Jaap ; 50 Ascomycetes, from Rehm ; 100 European 
Fungi, from Rabenhorst, Winter, and Pazschke ; 50 Econ- 
omic Fungi, from Seymour and Earle ; 150 Fungi of 
Germany, 50 Uredinese, 50 Phycomycetes and Protomy- 
cetes, from Sydow ; 150 Cryptogams of South Africa, from 
Wilms ; 400 North American Fungi, from Bartholomew, 
Ellis, and Everhart ; 100 Saxon Fungi, from Krieger ; 
25 Parasitic Fungi, from Briosi and Cavara; 3 exhibition 
sheets of Water-colour Drawings from Worthington G. Smith ; 
30 Water-colour Drawings of British Lichens for exhibition, 
from Highley. 

Among the additions acquired by purchase, special refer- 
ence may be made to 12 MS. volumes containing a classified 
series of annotated descriptions of the genera and species of 
British Basidiomycetes, prepared by Mr. Worthington G. 
Smith, and illustrated with 135 ink drawings exhibiting the 
characters of the genera and subgenera. More than 2,150 
species are described, thus affording a valuable supplement to 
the fine series of coloured drawings in the Department. 

VII. — Demonstrations. 

Demonstrations on the collections have been given by Mr. 
Britten to 31 members of the Catholic Association, April 8th, 
and by Dr. Rendle to 35 members of the Selborne Society, 
January 28th, to 25 members of the Co-operative Holidays 
Association Rambling Club, February 11th, and to 15 mem- 
bers of the West Ham Education Board, Nature Study Class, 
March 11th. 

Ylll.— Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits to the Department for consultation 
and research during the year was 1,939, 

For the whole of the year the Department was in charge 
of the Senior Assistant, Mr. James Britten. 

A. B. Rendle. 



BRITISH MUSEUM. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 25 February 1907 ;— /or, 

COPY " of Account of the Income and Expenditure of 
the British Museum (Special Trust Funds) for 
the Year ending the 31st day of March 1907; and, 
Return of the Number of Persons admitted to visit 
the Museum and the British Museum (Natural 
History) in each Year from 1901 to 1906, both Years 
inclusive ; together with a Statement of the Progress 
made in the Arrangement and Description of the 
Collections, and an Account of Objects added to 
them in the Year 1906." 



Treasury Chambers, | ' WALTER RUNCIMAN. 

11 April 1907. ) 



{Mr, Rothschild.) 



Ordered, hy The House of Commons, to he Printed^ 
11 April 1907. 



LONDON : 
PRINTED FOR HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE, 

BY EYRE AND SPOTTISWOODE. 

PRINTERS TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY. 



And to be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from 

WYMAN AND SONS, Ltd., Fetter Lane, E.G. ; or 

OLIVER AND BOYD, Edinburgh ; or 

E. PONSONBY, 116, Grafton Street, Dublin. 

105. 




[ 3 ] 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
I.— ACCOUNT OF THE RECEIPTS AND iSXPENDITURE OF 
THE BRIDGEWATER FUND, for the Tear ended 31st 
March 1907 - 4 

II.— ACCOUNT OF THE FARNBOROUGH FUND, for the sams 

period -------- -..4 

III.— ACCOUNT OF THE SWINBY FUND, for the same period - 6 

IV.— ACCOUNT OF THE BIRCH FUND, for the same period - - 6 

v.— ACCOUNT OF THE BEQUEST OF THE LATE MR, VINCENT 

STUCKEY LEAN for the same period . . - - . 8 

VI.— ACCOUNT OF THE BEQUEST OF THE LATE MR. CHARLES 

DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM for the same period - - 8 

VII.- -RETURN of the Number of Peesons admitted to visit the 
Beitish Museum and the Beitish Museum (Natueal 
HiSTOEY) in each Year from 1901 to 1906, both Years 
inclusive -----------lo 

VIII.— STATEMENT of Geneeal Peogeess at the Museum (Blooms- 
bury) 16 

IX. — STATEMENT of Peogkess made in the Aerangement and 
Desceiption of the Collections, and Account of Objects 
added to them, in the Year 1906 (Bloomsbury)- . - - 20 

X.— Ditto - - - ditto - (Natural History) - - - 99 



A 2 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



I.— AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditube of the 



To Balances on the 1st April 1906 - 

- DiviDiCNDS received on 13,150Z. 135. lOd. 
Stock in 21 per Cent. Consols, 
bequeathed by the Earl of Bridge- 
water, viz. ; 

On the 5th April 1906 £,. 82 3 10 

„ 5th July 1906 - 82 3 10 

„ 5th October 1906 - 82 3 10 

„ 5th January 1907 - 82 3 10 



- Rent of a Real Estate, bequeathed by 
the Earl of Bridgewater (less charges of 
collection, repairs, &c.) - 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 
437 M 11 



15 4 



27 16 



794 



Stock, 
2| % Consols 



£. s. d. 
13,150 13 10 



13.150 13 10 



II.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 





Cash. 


Stock, 
2i°/o Consols. 






£. s. d. 


£. s. d. 




To Balances ou the 1st April 1906 - - - 


333 9 3 


2,879 10 7 




.- Dividends received on 2,879/. 10*. 7d. Stock 
in 2i per Cent. Consols, be- 
queathed by Lord Farnborough, 
viz. : 








On the 5th April 1906 £.17 19 11 








.5th July 1906 - 17 19 11 








5th October 1906 • 17 19 11 








„ 5th January 1907 • 17 19 11 


71 19 8 






£,. 


405 8 11 


2,879 10 7 





ACCOUNTS, ETC., OP THE BBITISHf MUSEUM.' 



BEIDGEWATEK FUND, from the 1st April 1906 to the31&tMarcblS07. 



By One Year's Salary of the E ger ton Librarian - 
- Amount expended on purchase of Manuscripts 



Balances on the 31st March 1907, 
carried to Account for 1907-1908 



Cash. 


Stock, 
2^ °/o Consols. 


£. *. d. 
175 - - 

568 11 9 


A. s. d. 



50 15 



79i 



13,150 13 10 



13,150 13 lU 



FAKNBOROUGH FUND, from the 1st April 1906 to the 31st March 1907. 



By Amount expended on purchase of Manuscript - 

- Balances on the 31st March 1907, 
carried to Account for 1907-1908 



£. 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 
100 - - 

305 8 11 



Stock, 
2 J % Consols. 



£. s. 



2 ,879 10 7 



405 



11 2,879 10 7 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



III.— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the 






Cash. 


Stock, 
2^ °l^ Consols. 






£. s, d. 


&. s. d. 




To Balances on the 1st Aprill 906 - 


50 6 1 


5,683 1 6 




- Dividends received on 5,683/. is. 6d. Stock 
in 2i psr Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by Dr. George Swiney for Lectures 
on Geology, viz, : 








On the 5th April 1906 - £. 35 10 4 








„ 5th July 1906 - 35 10 4 








„ 5th October 1906 - 85 10 4 








„ 5th January 1907 - 35 10 4 


142 1 4 










£. 


192 7 5 


5,683 1 6 





IV-— AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of 



To Balance on the 1st April 1906 

-- Dividends received on 565A 3*. M. Stock in 
2^ per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by Dr. Birch in 1766, for the three 
Under Librarians of the British 
Museum, viz, : 



On the 5th April 1906 - 


£3 10 


8 


„ 5th July 1906 


3 10 


8 


„ 5th October 1906 - 


3 10 


8 


„ 5th January 1907 - 


3 10 


8 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 



14 



14 2 



Stock, 
2^% Consols. 



£. s. d. 
565 3 9 



565 3 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 



SWmEY FUND, from the 1st April 1906 to the 31st March 1907. 



Cash. 



By Amount paid to Dr. K. F. ScharfE, for Lectures 
on Geology in 1906 



Balances on the 31st Makch 1907, 
carried to Account for 1907-1908 



£. s. d. 
140 - - 



52 7 5 



£. 192 7 5 



Stock. 
2^ °/o Consols. 



6-. d. 



5,683 1 6 



5,683 1 G 



the BIECH FUND, from the 1st April 1906 to the 31st March 1907. 





Br Legacy paid to the three Under Librarians 
of the British Museum, whose oflBces 
existed in 1766, viz., the Keepers of the 
Departments of Printed Books, Manu- 
scripts and Natural History . - - 

- Balance on the 31st March 1907, 
carried to Account for 1907-1908 


Cash. 


Stock, 
2^% Consols. 




£. s. d. 
14 2 8 


&. s d. 
565 3 9 




14 2 8 


565 3 9 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



V. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest 
and Extension of the Library and Eeading-room of the British 





Cash. 


Local Loans 
Stock. 






£. s. d. 


£. *. d. 




To j4 MOUNT of Local Loans Stock on 1st April 
1906 .... 


— 


51,632 6 11 




- Dividends received during the year - 


1,566 12 n 






- Amount of Local Loans Stock purchased with 
the Dividends - - . 


- 


1,588 18 10 




£. ■ 


1,566 12 11 


53,221 5 9 





yi. — AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest 

1st April 1905 to 





Cash, 


Metropolitan 
.s^ \ Stock. 






£. s. d. 


£. s. d. 




To Amount of Metropolitan 3^ per cent. Stock on 
Ifet April 1906 - . . . 


- 


7,307 15 6 




- Dividends received during the year 


259 - 8 






- Amount of Metropolitan 3^ per cent. Stock 
purchased with the Dividends - 


- 


250 16 1 




£. 


259 - 3 


7,558 11 7 





ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



of the late MR. VINCENT STUCKEY LEAN (for the Improvement 
Museum) from the 1st April 1906 to the 31st March 1907. 



By Amount expended in the purchase of 
1,588Z. 18*. lOd. Local Loans Stock, Com- 
mission, &c. - - 



Balance op Stock on the 31st Maech 1907 
carried to account for 1907-1908 



£. 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 



1,566 12 11 



1,566 12 11 



Local Loans 
Stock. 



£. s. d. 



53,221 5 9 



53,221 5 



of the late MR. CHARLES DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM from the 
the 31st March 1907. 



By Amount expended in the purchase of 
250?. \&s. Id. Metropolitan 3^ per cent. 
Stock, Commission, &c. - - _ . 



Balance of Stock on the 31st March 1907 
carried to account for 1907-1908 



Cash. 



259 - 3 



259 



Metbopolitan 
31 % Stock. 



£. 



7,558 11 7 



7,558 11 7 



E. Maunde Thompson, 

Director and I'rincipal Librarian. 



10 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



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12 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The British Museum, Bloomsbury (including the Depart- 
ments of Printed Books and Maps, Manuscripts, Oriental 
Printed Books and Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, 
Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities, Greek and Roman 
Antiquities, British and Mediaeval Antiquities and Ethno- 
graphy, and Coins and Medals), is open to the public free 
daily (except on Good Friday and Christmas Day and days 
of Public Fast or Thanksgiving), as follows : — 



On Weekdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

After 4 p.m. in January, February, November, Decem- 
ber, and after 5 p.m. in March, September, October, only 
certain of the galleries remain open, viz. : — 



On Mondays ( Exhibitions of Manuscripts, Printed 

Wednesdays', ^^^''/^l^-'r ""^ Drawings, Porcelain, 

, < Glass & Majolica ; Prehistoric, British, 

^^ I Anglo-Saxon, Mediaeval and Ethnogra- 

Feidays l^phical Collections. 



On Tuesdays f Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek and Roman 
Thursdays ' Galleries (exclusive of the Vase Rooms 
' and Bronze Room) ; Gold Ornament 
Room, American Collections, and the 
Waddesdon Room. 



and 
Saturdays 



On Sunday Afternoons : — 

From 2 to 4 p.m. in January, February, November, 
December. 
„ 2 „ 5 „ „ October. 

„ 2 „ 5.30 „ „ March, September. 
„ 2 ,, 6 „ „ April, May, June, July, August. 



Persons applying for the purposes of research and i ef erence 
are admitted to the Reading Room under certain regulations 
every weekday, except the days specified below, from 9 a.m. 
until 7 p.m. The Newspaper Room is open, under similar 
regulations, from 10 a.m. until 4, 5, or i5 p.m., according to 
the season of the year. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 13 

The Reading Room, Newspaper Room, and Students' Rooms 
in the Library and Department of Manuscripts are closed on 
Sundays, Good Friday, Christmas Day, and the first four 
weekdays in March and September. 

Other Students' Rooms are closed on Sundays, Good Friday, 
and Christmas Day, and occasionally for cleaning. 

Students are admitted generally to the several Departments. 
on weekdays, from 10 till 4 or 5 o'clock ; and to the Sculpture 
Galleries from 9 o'clock till the hour of closing, 

British Museum, ■\ E. Maunde Thompson, 

80 March 1907./ Director and Principal Librarian. 



14 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 





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ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BEITISH MUSEUM. 



15 



The Exhibition Galleries of the British Museum (Natural 
History), Cromwell-road, South Kensington, including the 
Departments of Zoology, Geology and Palaeontology, Mine- 
ralogy, and Botany, are open to the public, free, daily, 
except Good Friday and Christmas Day, and days of Public 
Fast or Thanksgiving. 



The hours of Admission are as under : — 

On Weekdays, throughout the year from 10 a.m., in 

- to 



January - - - . 

February 

March - _ - . 

April to August 

September 

October - - - . 

November and December 



4 p.m. 

4.30 

5.30 

6 

5.30 

5 

4 



also, on Mondays and Saturdays only, from the begin- 
ning of May to the middle of July, to 8 p.m., and from the 
middle of July to the end of August, to 7 p.m. 



On Sundays, in 










January - 
February - 
March 


- 


- 


from 


2 to 4 p.m 
2 „ 4.30 „ 
2 „ 5.30 „ 


April _ - - 

May to August - 

September 

October - - - 

November and December 


- 


» 

>> 


2 „ 6 
2.30 „ 7 
2 „ 5.30 „ 
2 „ 5 

2 ., 4 



Persons are admitted to study in these Departments every 
weekdav from 10 till 4 o'clock. 



British Museum (Natural History), 1 E. Ray Lankester, 

23 February 1907. i Director. 



16 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

VIII. — General Progress at the Museum, Bloomsbury. 

It is a matter for regret that a further decline in the 
number of visits to the Museum has to be recorded for the 
year 190(j. The total number was 691,950, a fallincr off of 
nearly 122,000 from the number in 1905. Nor has the 
decline been confined to weekday visits, as it was in the 
previous year. The 57,738 visits on Sundays were less by 
4,369 than those in 1905. We must go back to the year 1900 
with its 689,249 visits before finding a total to compare with 
that of the year 1906. 

At the same time, it is an indication of a steady growth 
of intelligent interest in the collections that, while the 
numbers of visits decrease, the sale of Guide-books generally 
tends to increase. 

The number of visits of students to the Reading Room 
has also been reduced by 2,000, the total for the year being 
212,997, as against 214,940 in 1905. The daily average was 702. 

The average numbers of persons in the room, counted at 
the later hours of the afternoon, were : — 



4 P.M. 5 P.M. [ 6 P.M. 

349 256 172 



6.30 P.M. 
119 



The number of visits of students to particular Depart- 
ments in 1906 was 55,513, as against 57,557 in 1905. The 
number of visits to the Newspaper Room decreased by 2,000 ; 
while, as regards other fluctuations, there were 1,200 fewer 
visits in the Sculpture Galleries, but 800 more in the Depart- 
ment of Manuscripts, and nearly 1,100 more in the Department 
of British and Mediaeval Antiquities. 

During the year effect has been given to the scheme of 
the British Museum Extension which is projected to occupy 
in the future the site of the lines of houses on the north, 
east and west sides of the Museum, which were purchased 
in 1895. A building to form a range of galleries connected 
with the northern portion of the present Museum buildings 
is now being erected upon the site of demolished houses 
which formed the south side of Montague Place, under the 
control of the First Commissioner of His Majesty's Works ; 
Mr, John James Burnet, A.R.S.A., being the architect to 
whom the work is entrusted. 

The building is to consist of a basement and a sub-ground 
floor, for storage; a series of ground-floor galleries, for 
expansion of the library ; a mezzanine to be arranged in 
studies and students' rooms ; and a suite of exhibition 
galleries on the upper floor. The means for the work are 
provided from funds partly bequeathed by the late 
Mr. Vincent Stuckey Lean and partly voted by Parliament. 

A first contract for the construction of the basement and 
sub-ground floor was entered into in April, when work was 
commenced. 



GENERAI^ PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 17 

For many years serious defects have shown themselves 
in the facing stones of the Museum buildings, being chiefly 
due to the employment, during construction, of iron plugs 
instead of copper plugs for bonding ; with the result that a 
very large portion of the surface has been cracked and burst 
by oxidation of the iron. Repairs have been in progress 
since 1905, and will be continued until the injuries have been 
made good. 

As a further precaution against fire, the interior of the 
roof has been divided into smaller "risks" by the introduc- 
tion of sectional walls ; an elaborate system of lightning 
conductors has been installed ; and the opportunity has been 
taken to bring the fire-staff, formerly lodged some distance 
away, into residence in a spare house in Montague Place. 

The planing and polishing of all the wooden floors of the 
Museum galleries has now been completed, the floor of the 
Ethnographical Gallery having been treated during the year. 
The improvement in the cleanliness of the galleries, and even 
of the interiors of the show-cases into which, under the old 
system, the floating dust continuously raised by the traffic 
of visitors penetrated in spite of all precautions, is ample 
compensation for the time and money expended on the work. 

In the Sculpture Galleries, the Ephesus Room and Ante- 
Room, and the Phigaleian Room ; and, on the Upper Floor, 
the North Gallery, have been re-painted. Im r ements 
have been eff'ected in the ventilation and lighting of some of 
the exhibition galleries by the introduction of electric fans 
and additional skylights. 

In consequence of the largely increasing number of appli- 
cations for leave to make photographs from the collections, 
and the excessive demand upon the time of the superintending 
staff, the Trustees have been constrained to impose fees of a 
small amount for the privilege. 

Among the more important additions to the several 
Departments the following may be specially noticed : — 

The Department of Printed Books has been fortunate in 
acquiring as many as 246 Incunabula, or books printed before 
the year 1501, chiefly of German and Italian origin. This 
accession brings the Museum collection of Incunabula into 
the front rank, if it does not actually place it at the head of 
all collections in national libraries, duplicates being excluded 
from calculation. To the liberality of Lord Strathcona, the 
Hon. Walter Rothschild, and others, the Department also 
owes the possession of a collection of 158 works or editions 
hitherto unknown, including Incunabula and many books of 
the 16th century. Among single volumes of special interest 
added to the Department are " The Book of Good Manners," 
a very rare work, printed by Caxton in 1487 ; and seven 
early English plays and interludes printed between 1560 and 
1580. 

The Department of Manuscripts has made notable addi- 
tions to its collections. By gift of His Majesty the King 
105, B 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

it comes into possession of two Greek papyrus rolls from 
Herculaneum, which formed part of the series presented by 
the Neapolitan Government to the Prince of Wales in 
1803-6, five of the same series having been given to the 
Museum in 1865 by Her late Majesty Queen Victoria. Other 
valuable additions to the departmental collection of Greek 
papyri have been made by a donation from the Egypt 
Exploration Fund and by purchase. The Department has 
also acquired two valuable MSS. of Chaucer's " Canterbury 
Tales," and a volume of English Metrical Romances of about 
the year 1400 ; • as well as the official diplomatic corre- 
spondence of Charles, Lord Whitworth, from 1702 to 1725, 
and the political and private correspondence of the Marquess 
Wellesley, from 1797 to 1842. Mr. R. P. Brereton has 
bequeathed his collections relating to the churches of 
Northamptonshire, Rutland, and Somerset. 

The Department of Oriental Printed Books and Manu- 
scripts has secured some important Coptic MSS., and has 
added some further examples to its fine collection of Arabic 
MSS. of the 13th and 14th centuries. The large series of 
Tibetan MSS. and books which were presented by the 
Government of India in 1905 are noticed in this Return. 

The Department of Prints and Drawings has purchased 
an interesting series of portraits of eminent persons of the 
nineteenth century by Henri and Rudolf Lehmann. A 
selection of them is exhibited in the King's Library. The 
very important collection of Japanese woodcuts printed in 
colours, which was formed by Mr. Arthur Morrison, has also 
been added to the Department, which has further benefited 
by many liberal donations from private persons. 

To the Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities 
are added a remarkable statue of Sen-Mut, the architect of 
the Egyptian Queen Hatshepset, about 1550 B.C. ; a large 
series of scarabs which are an im.portant supplement to the 
Museum collection ; and a number of miscellaneous Egyptian 
antiquities, presented by the Egypt Exploration Fund. 
Among the Babylonian and Assyrian antiquities are a 
remarkable historical inscribed cone of a king of Babylon, 
about 2145 B.C. ; series of inscribed Babylonian tablets of 
2400-2000 B.C. ; and some very early and rare cylinder seals. 

To the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities is 
added an interesting series of Greek bronzes of the best 
period (p. 66, Nos. 9-16); and among the many donations to 
the Department are a series of casts of fragments of sculpture 
from the frieze of the Parthenon, presented by the Greek 
Government ; a rare series of votive off'erings, of the pre- 
Roman period, found in Spain and given by Mr. Horace 
Sandars ; and a group of Greek vases, the gift of Sir Henry 
H. Ho worth. 

The Department of British and Mediaeval Antiquities and 
Ethnography has secured a remarkable Italian albarello of 
the 15th century, together with other valuable specimens of 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 19 

maiolica ; a Byzantine medaUion of cloisonne enamel, the 
gift of Mr. Charles J. Wertheimor ; and an important series 
of temple-pictures and other objects fi-om Tibet presented by 
the Government of India. 

The Department of Coins and Medals has been enriched 
by a most important donation, from Dr. F. Parkes Weber, of 
Greek and Roman coins, and of mediaeval and modern, 
British and Colonial, and Oriental coins and medals, making 
a total of upwards of 5,500 pieces. 

Gifts of Museum publications, including reproductions of 
prints and drawings by Old Masters and sets of electrotypes 
of British Historical Medals, have been made to Free 
Libraries, Local Museums, and Art Schools throughout the 
United Kingdom, and "to institutions in various Colonies. 

The following are the publications issued by the Depart- 
ments at Bloomsbury during the year : — 

Cuneiform Texts from Babylonian Tablets, etc., in the 
British Museum. Parts XXIL and XXIII. 1906. Foolscap, 
7a-. 6d. each part. 

Coptic and Greek Texts of the Christian Period from 
Ostraka, Stelae, etc., in the British Museum. By H. R. Hall. 
100 plates. 1905. Foolscap, 21. 

Catalogue of the Greek Coins of Phrygia. By Barclay V. 
Head. With map and 53 plates. 1906. 8vo, 21. 

Medallic Illustrations of the Historv of Great Britain and 
Ireland. Plates XLI-L. Part V. 1906. Portfolio, 6s. 

Catalogue of MS. Music in the British Museum. By 
Augustus Hughes-Hughes. Vol. 1. Sacred Vocal Music. 
1906. 8vo, 21s. 

Subject Index of the Modern Works added to the Library 
of the British Museum in the Years 1901-1905. 1906. 
8vo, 21. 

Catalogue of Printed Books. Excerpt. " Byron." 1906. 
4to, Is. 

Catalogue of the Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Assamese, 
Oriya, Pushtu, and Sindhi MSS. in the Library of the British 
Museum. By J. F. Blumhardt, M.A. 1905. 4to, 11. 

Early Engraving and Engravers in England (1545-1695). 
A Critical and Historical Essay by Sidney Colvin. With 
41 photogravure facsimiles and 46 illustrations. 1905. Folio, 
51. 5s. 

Reproductions of Prints. New Series. Part XV. (Speci- 
mens of Line Engraving by German Masters of the Eighteenth 
Century). 11 plates. 1906. 2L 

Guide to the Sculptures of the Parthenon ; (a section of 
the Catalogue of Sculpture, Vol. 1). 3rd Edition. 1906. 
8vo, Is. 

Guide to the MSS., Autographs, Charters, Seals, Illumina- 
tions, and Bindings exhibited in the Department of Manu- 
scripts. With 30 plates. 3rd Edition. 1906. 8vo, 6c^. 
British Museum, | E. Maunde Thompson, 

30 March, 1907. ) Director and Principal Librarian. 

B 2 



20 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

IX.— PROGRESS made in the Arrangement and 
Description of the Collections, and Account 
OF Objects added to them in the Year 1906 
(Bloomsbury). 



Department of Printed Books. 

I. Arrangement. — The works added to the collection during 
the past year have, as far as possible, been placed on the 
shelves of the Library according to the system of classifica- 
tion adopted in the Museum. 

The press-marks, indicating their respective localities, have 
been marked on the inside and affixed to the back of each 
volume. 

The total number of these press-marks amounts to 
70,831 ; in addition to which 42,484 press-marks have been 
altered in consequence of changes and re-arrangements 
carried out in the Library ; 25,412 labels have been affixed 
to books and volumes of newspapers, and 119,107 obliterated 
labels have been renewed. 

The process of attaching third-marks to the books in the 
New Library, with the view of accelerating their delivery 
to readers, has been continued ; 18,503 books have been 
thus marked during the year, and the corresponding altera- 
tions, amounting to 97,797, have been carried out in General 
and Hand Catalogues ; 2,885 index-slips have been written 
for London Newspapers. 

The number of stamps impressed upon the articles received 
has been 428,403. 

4,720 presses of books and newspapers have been dusted in 
the course of the year. 

II. Catalogues. — (a) Cataloguing. — 43,742 titles have 
been written (the term "title" applying equally to a main- 
title and to a cross-reference). Of these, 31,986 were written 
for the General Catalogue, 2,347 for the Map Catalogue, and 
9,409 for the Music Catalogue. 

(h) Printing.— 26,468 titles and 1,122 index-slips for the 
General Catalogue, and 13,814 for the Music Catalogue have 
been prepared for printing during the year ; and 36,460 titles 
and 1,039 index-slips fo]- the General Catalogue, 4,802 titles 
for the Map Catalogue, and 13,814 for the Music Catalogue 
have been printed. 

Another volume of the Subject Index, embracing the 
period 1901-1905, and containing 51,400 entries, was published 
in 1900. 



DEPARTMENT OF FEINTED BOOKS. 21 

Readers have now at their disposal a Subject Index of all 
modern works added to the Library between January, 1881, 
and December, 1905. The total number of entries in the four 
volumes of the work amounts to 206,400. 

(c) Incorporation. — General Catalogue. — 35,655 title- 
slips and 873 index-slips have been incorporated into each 
of three copies of this Catalogue. This incorporation has 
rendered it necessary, in order to maintain as far as possible 
the alphabetical arrangement, to remove and re-insert 47,251 
title-slips in each copy and to add to each copy 1,007 new 
leaves. 

The system of fortnightly incorporation of accessions 
to the Library has been carried out with perfect regularity 
during the past year. 

Hand Catalogues. — The number of new entries made 
in the Hand Catalogue of " Academies " was 306 ; in that 
of "Periodical Publications," 592; in that of Maps and 
Charts, 469 ; in that of Music, 1,058 ; in that of London 
Newspapers, 2,885 ; and in that of Directories, 978. 

{d) Map Catalogue. — 2,347 titles have been written for the 
Map Catalogue, and 2,890 title-slips have been incorporated 
into each of three copies of it. This incorporation has 
rendered it necessary to remove and re-insert 8,120 title-slips 
in each copy and to add to each copy 292 new leaves. 

(e) Music Catalogue. — 9,409 titles have been written for 
the Music Catalogue, and 10,070 title-slips have been incorpo- 
rated into each of the two copies of it. This incorporation 
has rendered it necessary to remove and re-insert 18,860 title- 
slips in each copy of it and to add to each copy 407 new leaves. 

(/) Shelf Catalogue. — For this Catalogue, in which the 
title-slips, mounted on cards, are arranged in order of press- 
marks, about 27,400 have been so mounted and about 112,500 
have been incorporated in their proper order. 

(^) Catalogues of Books of Reference in the Reading Room, 
— The additions and alterations in each of the four inter- 
leaved copies of the Catalogue of Books of Reference in the 
Reading Room, which are requisite in order to record the 
changes in this collection by the addition of new works and 
the substitution of new for earlier editions, have been made : 
the number of such additions amounts to 55. 

Additions have also been made to the collection of books 
in the Galleries of the Reading Room b}^ the incorporation of 
new works of interest and importance; and by the substitution 
of new for earlier editions. The number of such additions 
amounts to 84. 

III. Binding. — The number of volumes and sets of 
pamphlets sent to be bound in the course of the year was 



22 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

13,619, including 4,031 volumes of newspapers. In conse- 
quence of the frequent adoption of the plan of binding two 
or more volumes in one, the number of volumes returned 
was [),995 ; in addition to which 91 volumes have been 
repaired in the binders' shops. 

Besides this, the following binding work has been done 
in the Library itself : — 6,323 volumes have been repaired ; 
354 broadsides, &c., have been inserted in guard-books, and 
4,938 volumes of reports, parts of periodicals, &c., have been 
bound in a light style of binding. 

The following maps, charts, «Szic., have also been bound or 
mounted during the year : — 39 atlases and 72 volumes of the 
25-inch Ordnance Survey have been bound ; 716 Ordnance 
Survey Indexes have been mounted on cards ; 270 maps have 
been mounted on linen, and 124 on cards ; four portfolios 
have been made for special maps. 

52,537 numbers of Colonial Newspapers have been folded 
into 969 parcels, and 1,011 such parcels have been tied up and 
labelled preparatory to being bound. 

16 volumes of the Blue Copy of the General Catalogue, 
13 volumes of the Red Copy, and 21 of the Green Copy have 
been broken up and rebound in 94 new volumes. Also, 352 
columns have been re-laid in each of the three interleaved 
copies of the General Catalogue — a process rendered necessary 
by the accumulation of titles under certain headings. 

IV. Reading Room Service. — The number of volumes 
replaced in the General Library after use in the Reading 
Room was 822,330 ; in the King's Library, 25,405 ; in the 
Grenville Library, 1,735 ; in the Map Room, 5,370 ; in the 
presses in which books are kept from day to day for the use 
of readers, 698,621 ; and in the Oriental Department, 469 ; 
making a total amount of 1,553,930 volumes supplied to 
readers during the year, exclusive of those to which the 
readers have personal access on the shelves of the Reading 
Room, 

The number of readers during the year was 212,997, giving 
an average of over 702 daily, the room having been open on 
303 days ; with an average of over seven volumes daily 
for each reader. 

Newspaper Room. — The number of readers during the 
year has been 19,723, giving a daily average of over 65, the 
room having been open on 303 days. The number of volumes 
replaced after use was 57,341, giving a daily average of 189 
and of over two volumes to each reader, not reckoning 
volumes, chiefly Parliamentary Papers, taken from the shelves 
of the Newspaper Room by the readers themselves. In 
addition to the above, 1,350 country newspapers were 
brought up to the Library from the Repository at Ilendon 
for the use of readers, and 82 visits were made to Hendon 
by readers. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 23 

Map Room. — 281 visitors have been admitted to the Map 
Room for the purpose of special geographical research. 

Photography. — There have been 356 applications for leave 
to photograph from books in the Library, and 1,013 volumes 
have been supplied to the applicants for this purpose. 

V. Accessions. — (a) 28,498 volumes and pamphlets (includ- 
ing 180 atlases, fee, and 1,336 books of music) have been added 
to the Library in the course of the year. Of these, 6,291 
were presented ; 14,454 received under the provisions of 
the Copyright Act ; 468 by Colonial Copyright ; 694 by 
International Exchange ; and 6,591 acquired by purchase. 

(b) 64,977 parts of volumes (or separate numbers of 
periodical publications and of works in progress) have also 
been added to the Library. Of these, 1,967 were presented 
39,107 received under the provisions of the Copyright Act 
436 by Colonial Copyright ; 481 by International Exchange 
and 22,986 acquired by purchase. 

(c) 1,793 maps in 11,238 sheets have been added to the 
collection in the course of the year. Of these, 879 maps in 
1,255 sheets were presented ; 684 maps in 9,183 sheets were 
received under the provisions of the Copyright Act ; 65 maps 
in 65 sheets, by Colonial Copyright ; and 165 maps in 735 
sheets were acquired by purchase. 

(d) 7,483 Musical Publications have been added to the 
collection. Of these, 6,999 were received under the provisions 
of the Copyright Act ; 452 by Colonial Copyright ; and 32 
were acquired by purchase. 

(e) The number of newspapers published in the United 
Kingdom, received under the provisions of the Copy- 
right Act during the year, has been 3,300, comprising 216,650 
single numbers. 1,148 of these newspapers were published 
in London and its suburbs ; 1,626 in other parts of England 
and Wales and in the Channel Islands ; 285 in Scotland ; 
and 241 in Ireland. 252 sets, containing 35,886 numbers of 
colonial and foreign newspapers, have been presented ; and 
83 sets, containing 12 volumes and 15,055 numbers of current 
colonial and foreign newspapers, have been purchased. 

(/) 4,128 articles not included in the foregoing paragraphs 
have been received in the Department. These consisl of 
a Broadside, Single Sheets, Parliamentary Papers, and other 
miscellaneous items. 

The total number of articles enumerated above, as having 
been received in the Department during the past year, 
exclusive of newspapers, is 106,879. 

Acquisitions of Special Interest. — During the course of 
the year 1906 the unusually large number of 246 Incunabula 
was added to the Library ; among these are many works of 
special interest and value, including two English books. 
The British Museum now possesses, exclusive of duplicates, 
9,088 books printed before the close of the year 1500. 



24 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

In addition to the two English Incunabula, 61 books 
printed in England or Scotland before the year 1640 were 
added to the Library during the year. 

The most interesting among the English and Scotch books 
are — 

" The Book of Good Maners." Printed by William Caxton, 
1487, In a stamped leather binding, probably the work of a 
provincial bookbinder, perhaps at Oxford or Cambridge, not 
long after the book was printed. Three other copies only 
of this book are known — one in the Library of Lambeth 
Palace, a second in the Cambridge University Library, and a 
third in the Royal Library at Copenhagen. The present copy 
wants six leaves, including the first and last, while several 
others have been cropped or injured. 

" The Contemplacyon of Sinners." Printed by Wynkyn 
de Worde, July 10, 1499. The meditations in English verse 
are attributed to Richard Fox, Bishop of Durham. The book 
is perfect and in good condition. 

" The Christen State of Matrymonye." Translated from 
the Dutch of Heinrich Bullinger by Miles Coverdale, 1543. 

Coverdale, Miles : '* The Christen rule or state of all the 
worlde," 1547. 

Lauder, William : " Ane Compendious and breue Tractate 
concernyngye Office and dewtie of Kyngis, Spirituall Pastoris 
and temporall Jugis." Printed by John Scot, 1556. John 
Scot had two presses, one in Edinburgh, the other at Saint 
Andrews ; the present book, of which two copies only are 
known, was probably printed at Saint Andrews. 

" An Exposition after the maner of a contemplacion upon 
the Li psalme." Printed by Thomas Marshe for Michael 
Lobley, London, (Licensed in 1557-58.) 

Seven early English Plays and Interludes, printed between 
1560 and 1580 : 

(1) " A newe Interlude of Impacyente poverte." 

John King, London, 1560. 
No other copy of this book is known. 

(2) " The Enterlude of Johan the Euangelyst." 

John Waley, London, c. 1560. 
No other copy of this book is known. 

(3) " A preaty new Enterlude of the Story of King 

Daryus." 

Hugh Jackson, London, 1577. 
No other copy of this edition is known. 

(4) " An Enterlude called lusty Juuentus." 

John Awdeley, London, c. 1560. 
No other copy of this edition is known. 

(5) " A pretie Enterlude called Nice Wanton." 

John Allde, London, c. 1560. 



DEPAllTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 25 

(6) "The playe of the weather. A newe and a very 

merye enterlude made by John Heywoode." 

John Awdeley, London, c. 1565. 

(7) " An enterlude of Welth and Helth." 

Without imprint. 
The book was entered afc Stationers' Hall in 
1557-8. No other copy of this book is known. 

Knox, John : " An Answer to a letter of a Jesuit named 
Tyrie." Printed by Robert Lekpreuik, Saint Andrews, 
1572. 

Rollock, Hercules : " Epithalamium " on the marriage of 
King James VI. and Anne of Denmark. H. Charteris, 
Edinburgh, 1589. 

Tarlton, Richard : " Tarlton's newes out of Purgatorie." 
Printed for T. G. and T. N., London, 1590. 

Nash, Thomas : " Pierce Penilesse, his supplication to the 
Divell." Richard Jones, London, 1592. 

Among the foreign Incunabula and later works, the 
following are of special interest : — 

Petrarch: " Historia Griseldis." Printed by Ulrich Zel], 
Cologne, about 1470. 

A broadside prospectus of an edition of Justinian's Codex, 
printed by Johami Sensenschmidt and Andreas Frisner, 
printers, of Nuremberg, in 1475. A copy of the book itself 
is in the Library. 

Hermannus de Schildis : "Speculum manuale Sacerdotum." 
Printed at Mainz about 1475 by the " Printer of the Darm- 
stadt Prognostication," who has not yet been identified. 

Mills, Joannes de : "Repertorium Juris." Printed by 
Nicholas Goetz, Cologne, about 1475. With the printer's 
metal cut device. 

Andreae, Joannes : " Additiones ad Speculum judiciale 
Durantis." Printed by G. Husner, Strassburg, 1476. 

The " Legenda Aurea," translated into Italian by Niccolo 
Malermi, printed by Gabriel de Piero, Venice, 1477. 

Vincent de Beauvais : " De liberali ingenuorum Institu- 
tione." Printed by the Brothers of the Common Life, 
Rostock, about 1476. 

" Libellus de regimine rusticorum," by Werner Rolewinck. 
Printed at Cologne about 1478, in the types of Arnold ter 
Hoernen, who mostly published Rolewinck's books in the 
first instance. 

" Rosarium odor vite." Printed in a type used by 
Stephen Plannck at Rome in 1479, and if by him one of his 
earliest books. A curious collection of moral extracts in 
Italian, with many words in the Neapolitan dialect. 



26 A.CCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A German version of the Vision of Tundal, with numerous 
woodcuts, printed by Johann and Conrad Hist, Speier, about 
1480. 

" Buch der Natur," with woodcuts, printed by Anton 
Sorg, Augsburg, 1482. 

Trovamala, Battista : " Summa Casuum." Printed by 
Nicolaus Girardengus, Novis, 1484. The only book known 
to have been printed at Novi. 

Paulas de Castro : " Consilia et allegationes." Printed 
by Anton Koberger, Nuremberg, 1485. 

A Psalter, printed by Georg Reyser, Wiirzburg, 148o. 
An unusually fine piece of printing. 

" Diss Buch heysset Lucidarius." Printed by Hans 
Schonsperger, Augsburg, 1488, with woodcuts. 

" Le Livre et auctoritez des saincts docteurs touchant 
de I'aduenement du maulvais Antexpist.^' Illustrated with 
twenty woodcuts. Six editions of this work are known, of 
each of which one or two copies only are extant. The two 
earliest were printed at Lyons, the two latest at Paris, and 
the two intermediate copies at one or other of these places 
or possibly at Angouleme. The present copy, hitherto 
undescribed, is one of two intermediate copies printed about 
1490. 

A Psalter, printed by Louis Cruse, Geneva, about 1494. 
Part of the Voynich collection described below, and therefore, 
like all the rest of the books in it, believed to be unique ; the 
work, moreover, of a very interesting printer. 

" Statuta d'Ascoli." Printed by Joannes de Theramo, 
Ascoli, 1496. No other copy of this book is known. 

"Coustumier de Normandie." Printed by Jacques le 
Forestier, Rouen, 1497 or 1498. 

A Missal of the use of Breslau, printed by Peter 
Schoeffer, Mainz, 1499. 

A Missal of the use of Hildesheim, printed by Georg 
Stuchs, Nuremberg, 1499. 

Erasmus, Desiderius : " Erasmi Roterodami Libellus de 
constructione octo partium orationis ex Britannia nuper 
hue perlatus." Leipsic, 1518. A Germa.n edition of Erasmus' 
Latin Grammar for the use of Saint Paul's School. 

A few books in bindings of special interest and value have 
been added to the Library during the year. 

Among these are — 

" Lettere de Messer Horatio Brunetto," Venice. 1548. In 
a sixteenth century Venetian binding, in calf, with tooling of 
an oriental design peculiar to the late fifteenth and early 
sixteenth century binders in Venice. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 27 

A fine edition of " Eikon Basilike," 1649. Bound in richly 
tooled red morocco with the arms of Charles I. 

" Book of Common Prayer," Oxford, dated 1681, but issued 
in 1689 or subsequently. Bound in red morocco with fine 
gold tooling and the arms of William and Mary. 

Settle, Elkanah : " Fears and Dangers fairly displayed." 
London, 1706. Bound in black morocco with the arms of 
John, first Duke of Rutland ; a fine specimen of Settle's 
bindings. 

" Book of Common Prayer," Oxford, 1772. Bound in 
transparent vellum, with paintings in monochrome beneath 
the vellum. A good specimen of the work of James Edwards 
of Halifax, who patented a process for making vellum 
transparent in 1785. 

Donations. — Among the many Donations with which 
the Library has been enriched during the year 1906 are 
the following : — 

A collection of forty-six volumes containing Translations 
into Bohemian of the works of English and American authors, 
published in Prague between the years 1900-1904. The 
translations include the Dramatic Works of Shakespeare in 
22 volumes, and novels and other books by J. M. Barrie, 
R. D. Blackmore, George Eliot, Nathaniel Hawthorne, 
Rudyard Kipling,. Mark Twain, and other authors. Presented 
by H.M. the King. 

A collection of one hundred and fifty-eight unknown 
books or editions, formed by Mr. W. M. Voynich. The 
collection includes fourteen incunabula ; thirty-one books 
printed between 1500 and 1532 ; three editions of the " Sex 
Linguarum Dictionarius," 1536, 1541, and 1548 ; a copy of 
Stanford's " Plees del Coron," 1560, with an interesting 
portrait medallion of Queen Elizabeth stamped on the bind- 
ing ; four Icelandic books printed between 1691 and 1694 ; 
seventeen books printed in small towns such as Aix, Annecy, 
Assisi, Asti, Cuneo, Lodi, &c., and three separate issues of the 
Atlas of Italy by Giovanni Antoni Magini, published in 1620 
and a few years later. Presented by the Lord Strathcona and 
Mount Royal, the Hon. Walter Rothschild, M.P., and others. 

" tJber den Durchstich der Landenge von Stagno." (By 
Archduke Ludwig Salvator.) Prague, 1906. Presented by 
H.I. and R.H. the Archduke Ludwig Salvator. 

" The Bishop Collection in the Metropolitan Museum of 
Art of the City of New York. Investigations and studies 
in Jade." 2 vols. Privately printed, New York, 1906. 
Bequeathed by the late Mr. Heber R. Bishop. 

" Monumenta Pulveris Pyrii.'" Reproductions of ancient 
pictures concerning the history of Gunpowder, with ex- 
planatory notes by Oscar Guttmann. Printed for the Author, 
1906. Presented by Oscar Guttraann, Esq. 



28 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A Collection of Newspapers published in the British 
Colonies during the year 1905, in continuation of the series 
previously presented. Presented hy the Royal Colonial 
Institute. 

Music. — The most interesting accessions to the Musical 
Library have been — 

Wilfflingseder, A.: " Musica teutsch," Nuremberg, 1572, 
interleaved with a partial translation into English in the 
handwriting of R. L. Pearsall. 

" OfFertoria totius anni," by J. P. A. Palestrina. Venice, 
1594. 

Pallavicino, Benedetto: " Sacrae Dei Laudes." Venice, 
1605. 

*' The Banquet of Musick ; or a Collection of the newest 
and best Songs." Printed by E. Jones, for Henry Playford, in 
the Savoy, 1689-1691. 

" A Collection of the best Scots Tunes, by A. Munro." 
Paris, 1723, 

0. K. Fortescue. 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 29 



Depaktment of Manuscripts. 

1. Catalogue of Additions. — All the MSS. acquired in 
1906, viz. Additional 37233-37425 and Egerton 2862-2866, 
have been described and (with the exception of Additional 
37348-37397) have been indexed. The descriptions have also 
been revised. 

The descriptions of MSS., etc., acquired in 1905 have 
been printed. The revision of the Index to the Sexennial 
Catalogue for 1900-1905 has been completed, and the Index, 
A-L, has been printed off. 

2. Catalogue of Papyri. — The preparation of descriptions, 
transcripts, annotations, etc., has been completed for Vol. III., 
and the text printed. The Index is well advanced, and 72 
out of 100 plates have been printed off. 

3. Catalogue of the Royal MSS. — One hundred and eighty- 
five MSS. in the Royal collection have been described for the 
new Catalogue in progress. 

4. Catalogue of Music. — Vol. I. (Sacred Vocal Music) has 
been bound and issued, the revision of descriptions for Vol. II. 
(Secular Vocal Music) has been completed, and sheets Y-2 V 
(end of text) have been printed off. The Index is in course 
of preparation. 

5. Catalogue of Romances. — Progress has been made in 
the preparation of Vol. III. 

6. Catalogue of Charters. — Additional Charters 47734- 
48170, 51533-52391 (acquired in 1903), and 53121-53194 
(acquired in 1904), have been described and indexed. 

The revision of topographical entries from Charters 
acquired in 1882-1890 for incorporation with the corre- 
sponding slips of the old collections and of the later acqui- 
sitions down to 1881, to form Vol. II. of the General Index of 
Charters, has been continued, letters A-G and part of H 
being ready for press. 

7. Class Catalogue of MSS. — The printed descriptions of 
Additional MSS. acquired in 1905 and of Egerton MSS. 
acquired in 1900-1905 have been incorporated. 

8. Binding. — Two hundred and eighty-three Additional 
MSS. and one Egerton MS. newly acquired, and one hundred 
and forty-six MSS. of the old collections, have been bound or 
repaired, together with fifty-four Books of Reference and 
Catalogues. 

One hundred and ten Charters have been repaired. 
Ninety -nine Papyri have been bound and glazed. 



30 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

9. Verification. — The entire collection of MSS. and some 
portion of the Additional Charters have been verified by 
comparison with the Shelf- and Box-Lists. 

10. Exhibitions. — A new Guide to the re-arranged General 
Collection of MSS. exhibited to the public has been completed 
and issued. Series I. of Reproductions from Illuminated 
MSS. exhibited has been prepared. 

11. Stamping, folioing, and placing. — One hundred and 
ninety-eight Additional MSS., eight hundred and thirty-nine 
Charters and Rolls, and one hundred and thirty-seven Books 
of Reference have been stamped, with a total of 21,619 
impressions. 

Two hundred and nine MSS. have been folio'd, with a total 
of 51642 folios. 25321 Index-slips, etc., have also been 
numbered. 

Four hundred and fifty-eight MSS. and one hundred and 
fifty-seven Papyri have been placed, press-marked, and 
entered in the Hand- and Shelf-Lists. Sixty-eight Charters 
and Rolls have been placed and entered in the Inventory. 
Numbers have been written on five hundred and nineteen 
Charters and Rolls. 

A new Hand-List has been made for the Harleian MSS. 
A Hand-List of Additional Charters and a Shelf-List of 
Exhibited MSS. are in progress. 

Thirty-nine Seals and Casts have been provided with 
boxes, placed and entered in the Inventory. 

12. Books of Reference. — One hundred and forty-four 
volumes and parts have been received, catalogued, and placed, 
and some progress has been made in the re-arrangement of 
Books in the Working Room. 

13. Consultation of MSS. — The number of MSS. consulted 
in the Students' Room attached to the Department was 32934, 
and of those delivered in the Reading Room 478. 

The number of Charters, Rolls and Seals consulted was 
4196. 

The number of Students working in the Department was 
11414. 

Magna Charta was exhibited to 8634 visitors. 

14. MSS photographed. — Five hundred and twenty-six 
MSS. (including Charters and Seals) were allowed to be 
photographed, with a total of 1340 photographs taken. 

15. Acquisitions. — The number of Manuscripts and Docu- 
ments, etc., acquired during the year has been — 

Additional MSS. - - - - - - 193 

Egerton MSS. ---__. 5 

Charters and Rolls ------ 73 

Detached Seals and Casts - - ' - 40 

Papyri -------- 235 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 31 

His Majesty the King graciously presented to the Depart- 
ment two charred papyrus rolls from Herculaneuin, which 
originally formed part of the gift of the Neapolitan Govern- 
ment to H.R.H. George, Prince of M^ales, in 1803-6. Five 
rolls from the same collection were presented to the British 
Museum by H.M. Queen Victoria in 18G5 ; the rest were 
destroyed in unsuccessful attempts to open them. Of the two 
rolls now presented, one has been opened, and contains portions 
of the work of Epicurus, De Natura ; the other is unopened. 

Another notable donation of Greek papyri consists of 
twenty-two papyri from Oxyrhynchus (Behnesa) presented 
by the Egypt Exploration Fund. These MSS. (the texts of 
which have been published by Dr. B. P. Grenfell and Dr. A. 
S. Hunt, the discoverers) include several literary works of 
great interest, notably (1) a fragment containing Sayings of 
our Lord, probably from the same collection (though not the 
same MS.) as the fragment published in 3 897, and including 
the introductory paragraph, which appears to assign the 
authorship of the collection to- Thomas and another apostle ; 
(2) considerable portions of an Epitome of Livy, differing 
from that hitherto known and coveiing books 37-40 (the 
complete text of which books is extant) and 48-55 (the text 
of which is lost) ; this MS., which can be assigned to the 
3rd century, is also of great palteographical value, early dated 
Latin MSS. being extremely rare ; (3) a large part of the 
Epistle to the Hebrews (ii. 14-v. 5, x. 8-xi. 13, xi. 28-xii. 17), 
written on the back of the Livy, late in the 3rd or early in 
the 4th century ; its text agrees in the main with that of the 
Codex Vaticanus where that is extant, and it is consequently 
important as indicating the probable text of that MS. in the 
latter part of the Epistle, where it is defective ; (4) about 
five columns of lyric poetry which may be assigned with 
confidence to Pindar, including an ode to be sung by a chorus 
of maidens, a class of Pindar's works not hitherto extant ; 
(5) a vellum leaf of a life of Alcibiades, written in a fine 
hand of about the 5th century. The rest of the donation 
includes a number of non-literary documents in good condition, 
of historical and palseographical importance. 

The Department has also acquired by purchase a large 
collection of Greek papyri, including a few literary fragments 
of minor interest, but consisting mainly of miscellaneous 
documents of the Eoman and Byzantine periods, which will 
furnish material for a future volume of the Catalogue of 
Papyri, and will contribute their share to the increasing 
knowledge of these periods which is being denved from the 
many publications of such texts now proceeding from all 
civilised countries, and in which the publications of this 
Department have taken an important part. 

Among other purchases the most important historically 
is a large collection of Wollesley Papers, now divided into 
forty-eight volumes. It chiefly consists of the political 



32 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

and private correspondence of the Marquis Wellesley from 
his appointment to be Governor-General of Bengal in 1797 
down to his death in 1842, and includes a large number of 
confidential letters from George IV., the Duke of Wellington, 
Canning, Dundas, Lord Liverpool, S. Perceval, Lord Gren- 
ville, Peel, Lord Grey, Lord Melbourne, and many other 
leading politicians of the time. The collection was reserved 
when the rest of Lord Wellesley's papers, which are of a less 
intimate character and relate almost exclusively to his 
government of India, were presented to the Museum in 
1842. 

The official correspondence of the well-known diplomatist 
Charles Whitworth, first Lord Whitworth, in fifty volumes, 
has also been acquired. It covers the years 1702-1725, 
during which he was British representative at Ratisbon, 
Vienna, Moscow, Berlin, and the Hague, and at the Congress 
of Cambray, and was chiefly carried on with successive 
Secretaries of State and English and foreign ministers 
abroad. 

The principal bequest received during the year was from 
Mr. Robert Pearson Brereton, of Oundle. It consists of 
his collections in twenty-threa volumes relating to the 
churches of north Northamptonshire and Rutland and to 
the church-towers of Somerset, and includes, besides notes 
and an incomplete architectural history of the buildings, 
nearly eight hundred permanent photographs taken by 
himself. 

Among other additions, by purchase, donation, or bequest, 
are the following : — 

Gospels, in Greek, with illuminated head-pieces ; late 
10th cent. 

St. Augustine, " De opere monachorum," etc., three quires 
of a MS. in Caroline minuscules of the 9th cent. 

Breviary, pars hiemalis, of Paris use, with illuminated 
initials, circ. 1300. Belonged to the College de Clermont 
at Paris. 

Vitse Patrum, and other lives of saints, written in 
Germany ; early 14th cent. 

A volume of English Metrical Romances, including King 
Richard, Bevis of Hampton, Florence and Blanchefloure, 
The Battle of Troy, Amys and Amylion, etc. ; circ. 1400. 

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales : the " Norton " MS., on 
vellum ; 15th cent. 

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, with Lydgate's Story of 
Thebes : the " Ingilby " MS., on paper; 15th cent. 

Breviary, of Ambrosian use, with coloured initials, written 
by Antonio de' Uberti, in the diocese of Milan, in 1402. 

Gospels, in Slavonic, with prefaces, etc. ; 16th cent. 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 33 

Letter from Captain W. Fenner to the Lord Admiral, 
reporting his discovery of a large vessel of the Spanish 
Armada in Havre Roads, 25 August, 1588. 

Narrative, in Latin, by Father John Gerard, Jesuit, of 
his proceedings in England, written about 1609 : I7th century 
copy from the original at Rome. 

Draft order for settling the militia in Scotland, with 
curious marginal notes in the hand of Charles I. [1642]. 

Draft by Sir E. Hyde of the letter of Charles IT. to the 
House of Lords enclosing his Declaration ; Breda, -^ April, 
1660. 

Report by a captain in the Duke of York's squadron of 
the action with the Dutch off Harwich ; 3 June, 1665. 

Bulstrode Whitelocke's " Annals of his own Life," in his 
own hand, ending with an account of his embassy to Sweden 
in 1653-4. Seven volumes. 

Letters of British Ministers abroad and others to George 
Stepney, Envoy to Berlin, Vienna, etc.; 1691-1706. 

Dispatches of H. St. John, Viscount Bolingbroke, and 
other Secretaries of State to the Earl of Strafford and John 
Robinson, Bishop of Bristol, Plenipotentiaries for the Treaty 
of Utrecht; 1711-1714. Two volumes. 

Letters of Admiral Sir Alex. J. Ball, Bart., Governor of 
Malta, to Granville Penn, on political affairs and the situation 
in Malta, Egypt, etc. ; 1802-1805. 

Letter of Napoleon Bonaparte, as First Consul, to the 
Minister of War, 1803 ; and an order of Admiral Sir W. 
Sidney Smith, 1813. Presented hy the Rev. John Charles 
Elgood. 

Letters and orders of Lord Collingwood, as Commander 
in Chief of the Mediterranean Fleet ; 1806-1809. 

Letter of General Grouchy, Governor of Madrid, to Prince 
Murat, giving an account of the revolt in Madrid against the 
French ; 3 May, 1808. 

Letter of General Latour-Maubourg, commanding the 
French cavalry, to Marshal Soult, giving his report of the 
battle of Albuera (16 May) ; 27 May, 1811. 

Pass-words for the Court and the City for each day in 
the months of July 1812 and November 1820, signed by 
George IV. as Prince Regent and as King. Presented hy 
His Majesty the King. 

Letters of Comte Adolphe de Circourt to H. Reeve on 
French and general European politics ; 1849-1853. Two 
volumes. 

Impressions of the Great Seal of King Edward VII. for 
the United Kingdom and for Scotland and Ireland. Pre- 
sented by the Right Hon. W. G. E. Macartney, Deputy 
Warden of H.M. Mint. 

105. c 



M ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Abridgement of law cases, compiled circ. 1620-1635, based 
on the rolls of the prothonotaries of the Court of Common 
Pleas. 

Arms in colour of the Knights of the Garter from the 
foundation of the order, with badges, biographical notes, etc. ; 
apparently begun about 1488 and continued to 1521. 

Confirmation of arms to Thomas Le Blanc, of London, 
and other descendants of David Le Blanc, of Rouen; 1753. 
With arms in colour. 



"The French Royal Greek Types and the Eton Chry- 
sostom," by Robert G. C. Proctor, 1903. Autograph, being 
the last bibliographical paper of the author, who was lost in 
the Alps in the same year. Presented by A. W. Pollard, 
Esq. 

Two lectures on Illuminated MSS., delivered at Cambridge 
by H. Yates Thompson, Sandars Reader in Bibliography, 
1905. Presented by the Author. 

Lectures on Illuminated MSS., delivered at Cambridge 
by Sir E. Maunde Thompson, K.C.B., Sandars Reader in 
Bibliography, 1906, Presented by the Author. 

Diary of Adam Winthrop, of Groton Manor, co. Suffolk, 
father of John Winthrop, Governor of Massachusetts ; 
1592-1610. Bequeathed by Robert C. Winthrop, of Boston, 
U.S.A. 

Journal of John Law, surgeon of the " Discovery," on 
the third voyage of Capt. James Cook to the South Seas, 
with full particulars of the death of Capt. Cook at Hawaii ; 
1778, 1779. Presented by G. G. Lawrence-Law, Esq. 

Register of the dining-club called the "King of Clubs," 
chiefly in the hand of the Rev. Sydney Smith ; 1798-1821. 
Presented by Cosmo Romilly, Esq. 

Journal of Henry Kirk, of Norton Folgate, London, 1816- 
1818 ; written in cypher. Presented by Eustace Neville- 
Rolfe, Esq., Consul General at Naioles. 

Memoirs of Toussaint Ambroise Talour de la Cartrie, 
Comte de la Villeniere, an officer in the Royalist army of 
La Vendee in 1793-1794, and subsequently a refugee in 
England, where he was known as the Count de Cartrie : an 
English translation made from the French original, now lost. 
Presented by John Lane, Esq., who published the Memoirs 
in 1906. 

Nine letters from Benjamin Disraeli to his sister, on 
political matters, etc. ; 1839-1845. 

Twenty-one letters of David Livingstone, during his 
return journey from Loanda to the Zambesi, addressed to 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 35 

Edmund Gabriel at Loanda ; 1 October, 1854 — 12 August, 
1855. 

Three letters of Card. J. H. Newman to J. Lewis, with 
reference to his Letter to the Duke of Norfolk (1875) ; 1877. 

Letters (single) from the animal-painters John Sartorius, 
junr., 1802, and John Francis Sartorius, 1828. Presented hy 
Mr. E. E. Leggatt, printseller. 

Nine letters of Sir Walter Scott to Miss Anna Seward, 
of Lichfield, on literary and other matters; 1802-1808. 

Letter from Honore de Balzac to A. Borget, with reference 
to Pere Goriot, Mme. de Berny, etc. ; March, 1835. 



Drawings of architectural details of English churches, 
castles, old houses, etc., by C. A. Buckler ; 19th cent, (from 
1843). Bequeathed {with other MSS. received in 1905) by 
the Artist. 

Drawings of churches in co. Northampton, with notes, by 
Gilbert Fletcher, of Towcester ; 1807-1812. Three volumes. 
Presented by H. S. Smith-Rewse, Esq. 

Court-rolls and terrier of Herringswell, co. Sufi'olk, with 
six charters relating to Cambridgeshire ; 14th cent. Pre- 
sented by Ronald Lyvett, Esq. 

Transcripts by the Bev. Edward Cookson, M.A., of 
registers of churches in Ipswich, co. Suffolk ; 1559-1837. 
Presented by the Rev. E. Cookson. 

Deeds (60) relating to Caterham, co. Surrey ; 16th-18th 
cent. Presented by the Rev. Joseph Hewetson. 

Crown-grants (3) of Stanstead and other manors, co. 
Sussex; 1555-1587. Presented by Mrs. Albert Way. 

Coloured map and full particulars of the lands of Richard 
Bridger, Esq., in Warminghurst, co. Sussex ; 1707. 

Court-book of the manors of Bromham-Baynton, Brem- 
hill, Stanley, etc., co. Wilts, belonging to Sir E. and Sir 
H. Baynton ; 1565-1612. 

Collections by James Sykes, relating to the family of 
Sykes, of Yorkshire and elsewhere. Five volumes. Be- 
queathed by the Collector. 

Collections by the late Sir H. Dryden, Bart. (d. 1899), 
relating to Broughs, Picts' Houses, Stone Circles, etc., in 
Scotland and the Shetland Isles, with drawings, plans, etc. 
Seven volumes. 

Charter of Queen Eleanor, widow of Henry IL, to the 
Abbey of Fontevrault; 1199. 

Compositions in four, five, and six parts for viols by 
English and Italian composers ; earl}'- 17th cent. 

c 2 



36 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

" Samson," oratorio in full score by G. F. Handel, with 
" cuts " indicated in the composer's autograph ; circ. 1750. 

Vocal duets and canons, by Giuseppe Aprile, 1776. Pre- 
sented hy F. G. Edwards, Esq. 

Symphony in D, by Charles Edward Horsley : autograph 
full score, 1844. 

Drum and organ parts to " Palestine," an oratorio by 
Dr. W. Crotch : autograph additions for a revival about 
1830. 

" May Day," cantata by Sir G. A. Macfarren : the con- 
ductor's score for the first performance ; 18.56. 

Music, with words, of the Russian National Anthem 
(composed in 1833), in the autograph of the composer Alexis 
de Lwoff; 1858. 

" Cantica," in the autograph of Giuseppe Verdi, composed 
for the opening of the Exhibition in London in 1862. 

" The Sleeping Queen," opera in the autograph of Michael 
William Balf e ; 1865. 

" Prinz Meihusalem," operetta in full score in the auto- 
graph of Johann Strauss, junr. ; circ. 1876. 

George F. Warner. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 37 



Department of Oriental Printed Books and 
Manuscripts. 

Cataloguing and Arrangement. — The numbers of the 
sheets of the various Oriental Catalogues sent to the press in 
1906 are : — Arabic Accessions, 3 sheets ; Gujarati Accessions, 
3 sheets ; Marathi Accessions, 6 sheets, Sanskrit Accessions, 
20 sheets. 

The numbers of the Titles written for the various Cata- 
logues are : — Arabic, 274 ; Armenian, 37 ; Assamese, 17 
Baluchi, 18; Bengali, 90; Burmese, 114; Canarese, 142 
Chinese, 734; Coptic, 4; Ethiopic, 10; Garo, 4; Gujarati; 
125 ; Hebrew, 271 ; Hindi, 221 ; Hindustani, 359 ; Japanese 
179 ; Kashmiri, 2 ; Kurukh, 6 ; Kurdish, 2 ; Malay, 28 
Malayalam, 30; Mandaitic, 2; Marathi, 113; Mundari, 2: 
Nepali, 2; Oriya, ]7 ; Pahlavi, 4; Panjabi, 66; Persian 
1,343 ; Pushtu, 23 ; Sanskrit, 599 ; Sindhi, 36 ; Sinhalese, 5 
Syriac, 22 ; Tamil, 168 ; Tigre, 1 : Telugu, 53 ; Tibetan, 
468 ; Turkish, 28 ; Zend, 10. 

Twenty Arabic MSS. and 33 Hebrew MSS. have been 
fully catalogued. 

Short descriptions of 200 MSS. acquired have been entered 
in the Descriptive List, the Register, and the Classed 
Inventory. 

Seventy MSS. (ff. 8,956) have been folio'd. 

Binding. — The numbers of Printed Books and MSS. sent 
to the Binders are : — Arabic Books, 120 ; Chinese Books, 64 ; 
Hebrew Books, 68; Persian Books, 121; Sanskrit Books, 
229 ; MSS., 92 ; Pamphlets, 57. 

Students. — The number of Students working in the 
Students' Room attached to the Department during the year 
is 3,313. The number of Oriental Printed Books consulted 
in the Department is 5,081, and of those used in the Reading 
Room 469. The number of Oriental MSS. consulted in the 
Students' Room is 5,594. 

Photography. — Eighty-six applications have been made 
to photograph from books and MSS. 

Additions. — The number of works added to the Depart- 
ment during the year is 2,204, of which 1,986 are Printed 
Books and 218 are MSS. Of the Printed Books, 869 were 
bought ; 733 were received under the India Copyright Act ; 
46 were received under the Colonial Copytight Act ; and 338 
were presented. 



38 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The MSS. are :— 

Arabic - - - - ~ - 9 

Arabic-Persian _ _ _ _ i 

Burmese ------ 1 

Chinese ------ 21 

Coptic - 19 

Hebrew ------ 5 

Mandaitic ----- 1 

Pali 2 

Persian ------ 6 

Sanskrit-Tibetan - - - - 2 

Syriac ------ 2 

Tibetan 145 

Turkish ------ 4 



218 



The most important acquisitions are : — 

Arabic MSS. — 1. Part of the Rasa'il Ikhwan al-Safa, an 
encyclopaedia of philosophy compiled by the society of the 
Ikhwan al-Safa or " Brothers of Purity " (Xth cent.). 
Part iii., treatise 5 — part iv,, treatise 3. A.H. 646 (a.d. 
1248). 8". 

2. Kitab al-masa'il fi al-tibb, a manual of medicine in 
catechetical form by Hunain ibn Ishak (died A.H. 294), with 
an anonymous commentary. Xlllth cent. 8°. 

3. A commentary by Ahmad b. al-Hasan al-Jarabardi 
(died at Tabriz in A.H. 746) upon the Minhaj al-wusul, a 
treatise upon the bases of Muhammadan law b}'- al-Baidawi 
(died A.H. 716). Books 4-6. a.h. 718 (a.d. 1318). 8°. ' No 
manuscript of this commentary appears to be known in 
Europe. 

4. 'Awarif al-ma'arif, a systematic treatise on Sufism by 
Shihab al-Din 'XJmar ibn Muhammad al-Suhrawardi (died 
A.H. 632). 8°. Written in Shiraz A.H. 729 (a.d. 1329). 

5. A detached volume of a work on Shafi'i law by 
Muhammad b. Bahadur al-Zarkashi (died A.H. 794), entitled 
Khadim al-Rafi'i wa'l Raudah. A.H. 854 (a.d. 1450). 4°. 
Manuscripts of this work are very rare. 

6. Asas al-iktibas, an anthological work by Ikhtiyar ibn 
Ghiyath al-DTn al-Husaini, completed in a.h. 897 (a.d. 1492). 
XV-XVIth cent. &. 

Chinese MSS. — 1. A treatise on the recognition of one's 
own faults (Chih kwo lun), by the Emperor K'ien-lung, in 



DEPARTMENT OF OKiENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 39 

the handwriting of the author, with his seal and signature. 
This manuscript, which is elegantly written and enclosed in 
finely carved boards and case, was taken from the Summer 
Palace by General Montauban in the campaign of 1860. 
Written a.d. 1782. Fol. 

2. A chronicle, by the Emperor K'ien-lung» of the ten 
successful military campaigns conducted by him. The MS. 
is a copy made by the minister Wu Sheng-lan. 12°. 

3. A treatise on the " Great Plan," one of the Chapters of 
the Book of History, by the Emperor K'ien-lung. Embroidered 

' in silk, roll form. 

Chinese Printed Books.— I. A coL'ection of about 850 
Chinese volumes, forming the greater part of the Chinese 
library collected by the late T. Watters, consisting mainly of 
. Buddhist works and of works on the geography of Buddhist 
countries ; together with a very fine copy of the Chinese 
classics. This collection throws a valuable light on the 
places visited by the early Chinese Buddhist travellers in 
India and in the intermediate countries. 

Coptic MSS. — 1. Fifty folios of the Pauline Epistles, in 
the Sahidic version. Y-VIth cent. 

2. Twelve documents on papyrus, belonging to a series 
discovered in the monastery of Tcheme in Western Thebes, 
of which the British Museum already possesses 70. They 
consist of wills, deeds of sale, records of disputes over inherit- 
ance, &c., and belong to the first half of the Vlllth cent. 

A.D. 

Hebrew MSS. — 1. Seri hag-guf, a treatise on medicine by 
Nathan b. Joseph Palquera. Dated A.M. 5192 (a.d. 1432). 4°. 

2. A marriage-contract between Ephraim b. Kalonymos 
Sanguini and Luna, daughter of Mordecai Fano. The oldest 
illuminated Hebrew document of the kind hitherto made 
known. Modena, A.D. 1558. 

3. A commentary on the first part of the Mishnah, called 
Seder Zera'im, by Isaac b. Melchizedek. Vellum, a.m. 5047 
(A.D. 1287). 12°. 

4. Prayer-book of the" German rite. Vellum, XIII- 
XlVth cent. 12°. 

• 5. Services for the New Year and Day of Atonement, 
characterised by features of the rare old French ritual. 
Written in Corfu in the XVIilth cent. 8°. 

.. Hebrew Printed Books, — 1. The first edition of David 

Kimhi's Hebrew Dictionary. Printed before 1480, probably 

at Rome. 

. .2. Sefer Habakbuk, a parody on the feast of Purim, 
.written in imitation of the prophetical style of the Old 

Testament. Printed at Pesaro, a.d. 1513. 



40 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

3. Massekheth Purim, a parody on the feast of Purim, 
written in imitation of the Talmudic style. Printed at 
Pesaro near the beginning of the XYIth cent. 

4. L'Ornement Hebraique, par D. Gunzburg et V. StassofF. 
1905. A large portfolio containing coloured reproductions 
of Hebrew manuscript illuminations. 

Mandaitic MSS. — 1. A manuscript containing part of 
the Kolasta, comprising the Book of Souls, and hymns. 
XlXth cent. 

Pali MS. — 1. The Upari-pannasa, the third section in 
the Majjhima-nikaya of the Sutta-pitaka. Written in the 
old Burmese square character, on palm-leaves. Early XlXth 
cent. 

Persian MSS. — l. A divan of poems (ghazals) by Zaki 
Hamadani (died a.h. 1030). a h. 1036 (a.d. 1C21). 8°. The 
Divan of a very little known author, no copy of which is at 
present recorded to exist in Europe. 

2. Salutar, a treatise on farriery, being the Persian trans- 
lation of the Sanskrit Salihotra, made by order of 'Abd 
Allah Khan Firiiz-jang about A.H. 1037. With 17 miniatures. 
a.d. 18.51. 4°. 

Sanskrit and Tibetan MS. — 1. Abhidhana-muktamala, 
in Tibetan mNgon brjod mu tig phreng ba, a vocabulary of 
Sanskrit synonyms, with Tibetan iiLterpretation. XVII- 
XVIIIth cent. 

Syriac MSS. —1. A volume containing (1) the Book of 
Gifts, by Mar Shubhha le-Maran : (2) a homily on the 
solitary life, addressed to monks and others by Abraham 
of Nephtar : (3) an account of persecutions of Christian 
Fathers, by Bar-^adbeshabba : (4) a homily of Theodore [of 
Mopsuestia] against the followers of Macedonius, &c. Vellum, 
IX-Xth cent. 8°. 

2. Minor Offices of the Nestorian Church. A. Gr. 1909 
(A.D. 1598). 8°. 

Tibetan MSS.—l. The Kanjur (bKa-'gyur), the first or 
scriptural section of the Buddhist Canon of Tibet, in 106 
large folio volumes, finely written and illuminated. 

2. Three copies of the Pahcha-vimsati-sahasrika-Prajna- 
paramita, one of the great philosophical works of the 
Buddhist scriptural canon, in large folio volumes, finely 
written in gilt letters. 

3. A copy of the same work remarkable for its extremely 
archaic spelling. Fol. 

4. Ashta-sahasrika-Prajna-paramita, one of the chief 
philosophical works of the Buddhist scriptural canon, 
finely written in gilt letters, and enclosed in beautifully 
carved wooden boards. Large fol. 



DEPAKTMENT OF ORIENTAL FEINTED BOOKS AND MSS. 41 

5. The Bhadra-kalpika-sutra, one of the chief sacred 
texts of Northern Buddhism. FoL 

6. Nineteen miscellaneous manuscripts treating of the 
ritual and religious doctrine of various Tibetan sects. 

7. A record of the foundation of the monastery of Urgyan 
gling. 

8. rGyal rabs, a standard history of the kings of Tibet. 

9. The Kalapa-vyakarana, i.e., the Ka-tantra, a well- 
known series of aphorisms on Sanskrit grammar, with a 
commentary, in Tibetan. 10 pts. Fol. 

10. Three sets of musical scores for ritual chanting. 

Tibetan Printed Books. — 1. The Tanjur (bsTan-'gyur), the 
second great section of the Tibetan Canon, in 214 volumes. 
Fol. 

2. About 200 miscellaneous volumes and tracts, chiefly 
treating of the religious doctrine and practice of the various 
sects of Tibet, and especially of the dGe-lugs-pa school. 

The above Tibetan collections were presented by the 
Government of India in 1905. 

Turkish MSS.—l. Ottoman Annals. a.h. 1203-1206 
(a.d. 1788-1792). A full court chronicle, without author's 
name. XVIIIth cent, (before a.h. 1229, a.d. 1814). 8". 

2. Tarikh i TamashvarT, a history of Turkey from A.H. 
1094 to 1157 (A.D. 1683-1744), by Ibrahim Na'Tm al-Din 
Tamashvari. Composed in a.h. 1178 (a.d. 1764). XVIIIth 
cent. 8°. 

3. Vard i mutarra, lives of Grand Viziers of Turkey from 
Raghib Muhammad Pasha to Yusuf iya Pasha (a.h. 1171- 
1217). Composed in a.h. 1217 (a.d. 1803) by Ahmad Javid 
Bey, Early XlXth cent, (before A.D. 1822). 8°. 

Robert K. Douglas. 



42 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Department of Prints and Drawings. 
1. — Arrangement and Cataloguing. 

The prints and drawings contributed to the Nelson 
exhibition in the King's Library have been removed and 
been replaced by an exhibition of the series of portrait 
drawings by Henri and Rudolf Lehraann, recently acquired. 

A selection has been made of prints and drawings of all 
schools and periods, to be reproduced for the proposed loan 
collection of 240 lantern glides, and the slides have been 
completed and delivered, 

The work of sorting and arranging in wrappers the 
collection of portraits of English royal personages be- 
queathed by Lord Cheylesmore has been completed, and 
references to it have been inserted in the index of English 
Portraits. 

The collection of fifteenth and sixteenth century printed 
books illustrated with woodcuts, presented by Mr. William 
Mitchell in 1904, has been definitely arranged with a few of 
similar character otherwise acquired, the volumes being 
grouped, so far as difi'erence of size would permit, in the 
alphabetical order of their places of printing. A list of the 
books in this class, 85 in number, of which the Department 
of Printed Books does not possess copies, has been drawn up 
and sent to the keeper of that Department in order that 
the titles and references may be inserted in the Library 
Catalogue. 

All the Italian drawings belonging to the Malcolm and 
Vaughan collections have been incorporated with the main 
series in a single alphabetical order. 

The collection of etchings and lithographs by J. McNeill 
Whistler has been mounted, lettered, and arranged in eight 
solander cases. 

The mounting and lettering of the etchings by Charles 
Meryon have been completed, and the collection has been 
arranged in seven solander cases. 

The collection of prints after English masters has been 
examined, and all woodcuts, the subjects of which were 
drawn on the blocks by the original artists, have been 
removed and formed into a separate series of English 
woodcuts arranged under the designers' names in two 
portfolios. 

The collection of unmounted German etchings has been 
arranged in two portfolios. 

The collection of etchings and woodcuts by Robert Bryden 
Las been arranged in a portfolio. 



DEPAETMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 43 

The collection of photographs executed for the National 
Photographic Record and survey has been sorted and arranged 
topographically in eighty boxes in one of the two basement 
rooms placed at the disposal of the Department of Prints and 
Drawings by the Department of Printed Books. 

The loan collection of framed duplicate engravings has 
been removed to and arranged in the adjacent basement 
room, together with all spare exhibition frames belonging to 
the Department. 

Eight hundred and twenty-eight prints and one hundred 
and forty-two drawings recently acquired have been incor- 
porated with the collections to which they severally belong. 

The collection of eighteen hundred and fifty-one Japanese 
colour-printed woodcuts (on two thousand one hundred and 
one sheets), acquired from Mr. Arthur Morrison, has been 
received, checked, and sorted as a preliminary to the work of 
registration and mounting. 

All books of prints and books of reference recently 
acquired have been catalogued, labelled, and placed on the 
shelves. 

The preparation of a general catalogue of the collection 
of English Portraits has been resumed. 

The preparation of a descriptive catalogue of the collection 
of Early German and Flemish Woodcuts has been continued, 
and the MS. of the whole division relating to the School of 
Augsburg completed and prepared for press. 

Vol. IV. of the catalogue of English Drawings, containing 
in alphabetical order the names from S to Z, has been com- 
pleted and is passing through the press. The preparation of 
a supplementary volume has been commenced. 

The preparation of a catalogue of the collection of 
drawings by Rembrandt, for departmental use, has been 
completed ; a subject index to his drawings and etchings, and 
a bibliography of the subject, have also been drawn up. 

The preparation of a descriptive catalogue of the collection 
of. fifteenth-century Italian Engravings has been commenced 
and completed so far as concerns the Florentine School. 

A MS. index to the recently published " List of Works of 
Early English Engravers " has been prepared. 

Titles have been written for articles in the " Gazette 
des Beaux Arts" and various other foreign periodicals for 
insertion in the catalogue of Books of Reference. 

The collection of Turner's "Liber Studiorum " has been 
marked off in the new edition of Rawlinson's catalogue. 
:■-■:'■ The collection of foreign royal portraits has been provided 
'with new wrappers. 

The preparation of an index to the Banks collection of 
shop bills, invitation cards, &;c. has been continued. 



44 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

The transcription for press of the catalogues of English 
Portraits and English Drawings has been continued. 

Eleven hundred and fifty-five items have been entered in 
the Register of acquisitions. 

Three thousand two hundred and four prints, drawings, 
&ic. recently acquired, have been impressed with the depart- 
mental stamp and references to the Register. 

The work of preparing, specially repairing, and mounting 
a selection from the Cheylesmore collection of mezzotint 
portraits, additional to that shown in the exhibition gallery, 
has been continued. Three hundred " ordinary " mezzotints 
belonging to the same collection have been fixed in wrappers 
for their better preservation. 

Five hundred and ninety-nine drawings and prints have 
been prepared and mounted on sunk mounts, and five hundred 
others have been mounted in the ordinary manner. 

The total number of students admitted to the Print Room 
during the year ending 31st December 1906 was 8,396. 

Three hundred and fifty applications were made for leave 
to photograph objects in the collection and 2,017 photographs 
were taken. 

II. — Additions. 

The total number of prints, drawings, &;c. acquired 
during the year was 4,176, of which the following are the 
most important : — 

Italian School. 

Braivings. 

Credi, Lorenzo di. Study of a child's arm ; silver-point 
heightened with white. From the Lely collection. 

Galli, Francesco (da Bibiena). Five designs for operatic 
scenery ; pen and sepia. Presented by Col. Croft Lyons 
through the National Art Collections Fund. 

Robusti, Jacopo (Tintoretto). Assumption of the Virgin ; 
sketch in oils on paper ; a fine and important example. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 
Vinci, Leonardo da. Mona Lisa ; woodcut by A. Kriiger ; 
printed in colours. 

German School. 
Drawings. 

Diirer, Albrecht. Christ on the cross between the Virgin 
and St. John ; with two separate studies for the Virgin and 
one for the crucifix ; pen and ink ; an interesting small 
example hitherto unknown. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 45 

Woodcuts. 

Master H.M. " Das gantze Leben vnd Historia des . . . 
Hertzogen Friderichen, Churfursten zu Sachsen," &ic. ; large 
sheet of cuts by a Saxon artist, c. 1554. Transferred from 
the Department of Printed Boohs. 

Engraving. 

Master B.M. (fifteenth cent.). Two knights in armour. 
(Pass. ii. 241, 217). The only known impression with the 
monogram. 

Schools of the Netherlands. 

Drawings. 

Vos, Maarten de. Thirty-one designs of New Testament 
subjects ; pen and bistre. 

Engraving. 

De Bry. Triumphal arch commemorating the marriage 
of Frederick, Elector Palatine, with Elizabeth of England. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 
Potter, Paulus. Equestrian portrait of Dirk Tulp ; by 
Pieter Dupont ; engraved at the expense of Dr. Six. Pre- 
sented by Dr. J. Six van Hillegom. 

French School. 
Drawings. 

Massard, Leopold. Portrait of Francis I., Emperor of 
Germany ; pencil. 

Millet, Jean Frangois. Study for " Les Glaneuses " ; black 
chalk. " L'Enfant Malade " ; black chalk. Both from the 
Staats Forbes collection. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 

Loir, Luigi. " Le Val de Grace " ; by G. Rodriguez ; 
etching. Presented by the Prefect of the Seine. 

Rixens, Jean Andre. " Le Feu " ; by G. Fraipont ; etching. 
Presented by the Prefect of the Seine. 

Scandinavian School. 

Etching. 

Thaulow, Fritz. " Les Cygnes " ; printed in colours. 



46. ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



FoREiCxN Artists working in England. 

Lehmann, Henri and Rudolf. One hundred and two 
portraits, chiefly executed in pencil, of eminent persons of 
the nineteenth century, viz. — rH.R.H. Albert Edward, Prince 
of Wales, H.R.H. George, Duke of Cambridge, Sir E. Ball, 
Sir J. Bowring, Sir D. Brewster, Elizabeth B. Browning, 
R. Browning, R. Chambers, Sarah J. Clarke (Grace Green- 
wood), Wilkie Collins, Charlotte Cushman, E. Deutsch, 
C. Dickens, J. Gibson, R.A., W. S. Gilbert, W. E. Gladstone, 
Sir M. G. Duff, Bret Harte, O. Wendell Holmes, H. von 
Herkomer, R.A., Lord Herschell, Lord Houghton, T. H. 
Huxley, Henry James, Lord Leighton, Robert Lowe, G. H. 
Lewes, J. R. Lowell, Lord Lytton, Cardinal Manning, Sir 
Theodore Martin, Sir J. E. Millais, L. Motley, F. Max Miiller, 
Sir R. Owen, B. W. Procter, C. Reade, Sir C. Russell, J. 
Burdon-Sanderson, H. M. Stanley, W. W. Story, Lord Strat- 
ford de RedclifFe, Tom Taylor, Lord Tennyson, Sir H. 
Thompson, Mrs. Humphry Ward, G. F. Watts, R.A., Pope 
Pius IX., Frederick William, Crown Prince of Prussia, E. About, 
J. J. Ampere, Cardinal Antonelli, B. Auerbach, G. Baini, 
C. E. Beule, W. Bouguereau, F. Bremer, F. Chopin, P. von 
Cornelius, E. Du Bois-Reymond, J. F. Eckermann, H. W. 
Ernst, H. Flandrin, J. Froebel, Robert Fleury, J. L. Gerome, 
G. Gervinas, C. Gounod, F. Gregorovius, K. Giitzkow, F. 
Heilbuth, E. Hildebrandt, F. HiUer, A. von Humboldt, J. 
Joachim, L. Knaus, A. de Lamartine, R. Lepsius, C. F. Lessing, 
F. Liszt, W. Liibke, J. Massaret, A. Menzel, G. Meyerbeer, 
J. Moscheles, T. Mommsen, F. Overbeck, L. Pasteur, L. von 
Ranke, A. von Reumont, A. Riedel, E. Rietschel, A. Ristori, 
C. Schnaase, Clara Schumann, M. von Schwind, G. Verdi, 
W. Verestschagin, R. Virchow, G. Waagen, J. Sandeau, and 
H. and R. Lehmann. 

Lely, Sir Peter. Portrait of a lady ; crayons. 



Etchings. 

Arendsen, P. J. Portrait of Georgiana, Duchess of 
Devonshire ; from picture by Gainsborough at Althorp ; 
artist's proof. Presented hy the Artist. 

Lithographs. 

Herkomer, Hubert von, R.A. " Echoes from the German 
Alps " ; set of twelve ; 1877. Presented hy C. Rowley, esq. 



Engraving. 

Bovi, Mariano. Lady Hamilton dancing the Tarantella 
after W. Locke. 



department of prints and drawings. 47 

English School. 

Draivings. 

Beardsley, Aubrey. Satirical portrait of himself; pen 
and ink. Presented hy R. Ross, esq. 

Bone, Muirhead. The great Gantry at Charing Gross 
Station ; pencil. Presented by the National Art Collections 
Fund. The Avenue Theatre, as injured by the fall of part 
of Gharing Gross Station, 5th December 1905 ; pencil. 
Presented by the Artist. 

. Graig, William Marshall. Portrait of Princess Gharlotte ; 
watercolours. 

Gruikshank, Isaac. The sailor's description of a sea- 
fight ; watercolours. 

Dadd, Richard. Sketch of a curiosity shop ; dated 
" Bethlehem Hospital, June 22, 1854 " ; watercolours. 

Dance-Holland, Sir Nathaniel, R.A. Portrait of a gentle- 
man ; pencil. Presented by E, E. Leggatt, esq. 

Forster, Thomas. Portrait of a gentleman ; pencil on 
vellum; signed and dated 1705. 

Gainsborough, Thomas, R.A. Boy, girl, and dog at a 
stile ; black chalk. Presented by H. J. Pfungst, esq.,F.S.A., 
through the National Art Collections Fund. 

Gillray, James. Three sketches for caricatures on 
Napoleon ; pen and watercolours. 

Humphry, Ozias, R.A. Portrait of Edward Edwards 
A. R.A, ; charcoal heightened with white. Presented by 
E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

John, Augustus Edwin. Two studies of a male model ; 
charcoal. Study of a baby's head ; black chalk. "Tarrying 
late " ; a composition ; charcoal. Presented by the Artist. 

Landseer, Sir Edwin, R.A. Monks carousing; pencil. 
Sketch for " Death of the Wild Bull " ; pencil. Two land- 
scape sketches ; pencil. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Landseer, Jessica. Portrait of Thomas Landseer, A. R.A. ; 
crayons. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Lawrence, Sir Thomas, P.R.A. Portrait of a lady ; red 
and black chalk. Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Locke, William. Two studies of Lady Hamilton dancing 
the Tarantella, combined in a group ; pen and watercolours. 

Mason, George, A. R.A, Girl holding vessel on her head; 
sketch in oils on paper. A Crilf ; sketch in oils on paper. 
Studies of a girl dancing ; Indian ink. Studies for group of 
shepherd and dog ; black chalk. Sheet of studies of calves 
and sketches of picture compositions ; pencil. 



48 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Moore, Albert. Woman reclining; a drapery study; 
white and black chalk on brown paper. 

Rich, Alfred W. Ditchling Mill, Sussex ; watercolours. 
Southwick Harbour, Sussex ; watercolours. Presented by 
the Artist. 

Romney, George. Sketch of Miss Vernon with a dog, for 
the picture " The Sempstress " ; pen and Indian ink. 

Rowlandson, Thomas. Fifteen sketches for political 
caricatures, 1784 ; pencil. 

Scott, David, R.S.A. Knowledge questioning Death ; 
pencil. 

Smith, W. A. Portrait of a lady, 1790 ; pencil and water- 
colours. 

Spiers, Richard Phene. The portico of Prince Napoleon's 
Pompeian house in Paris, 1860 ; watercolours. Presented by 
the Artist. 

Stevens, Alfred. Back view of a nude figure ; red chalk. 
Studies of head and arm of a woman ; red chalk. Studies of 
the nude female model ; red chalk. 

Watts, George Frederick, R.A. Thirty-five studies and 
cartoons for his pictures. Presented by Mrs. Watts. 

White, Robert. Portrait of a gentleman ; miniature in 
pencil on vellum. 

Worlidge, Thomas. Portrait of Dutton the watchmaker ; 
pencil on vellum ; signed and dated 1736. 

Etchings. 
Allan, David. " Presbyterian Penance " ; aquatint. 
Bretherton, James. Four plates after H. W. Bunbury. 

Strang, William. Portrait of Reginald Cripps. Presented 
by R. Cripps, esq. 

Lithographs. 

Crane, Walter. Portrait of himself, 1905. " The World 
for the Workers," 1904. Presented by the Artist. 

Rothenstein, William. Portrait of Mrs. Alice Meynell. 
Presented by Campbell Dodgson, esq. Manchester Portraits ; 
set of twelve lithographic drawings. Presented by C. 
Rowley, esq. 

Engravings. 

Blake, William. Trial proofs of leaves 53 and 5 of the 
prophetic book " Jerusalem, the Emanation of the Giant 
Albion," 1804 ; on back aud front of one sheet, hand coloured 
by the artist. 

Cockson, Thomas. Portrait of Thomas Blount, Lore* 
Mountjoy. From the Truman collection. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 49 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 

Bimbury, Henry William. Thirty-five plates of domestic 
and humorous subjects, illustrations to Shakespeare, &c. 
engraved by C. Knight, Tomkins, Bretherton, and others. 

Cos way, Richard, R.A. Hebe; by A. ZafFonato, stipple; 
printed in colours. 

Crane, Walter, Certificate for swimming, Battersea ; 
from a line block. Certificate of the Manchester Unity 
Friendly Society ; photogravure. Dancer ; photolithograph. 
The Bridge of Life ; from a cartoon ; photolithograph. Peace, 
1902 ; photolithograph. Presented by the Artist, 



American School. 
Etchings. 

Blum, Robert Frederick. Collection of seventeen plates. 
Presented by the Cincinnati Museum Association. 

Japanese School. 

The Arthur Morrison Collection of Japanese Woodcuts 
printed in colours, including examples by the following 
artists : — ^Ashikuni, o ; Ashiyuki, 1 ; Bairei, 3 ; Banki, 2 
Ippitsusai Buncho, 4 ; Bunro, 2 ; Chikanobu, 36 ; Choki 
10; Danjuro, 1; Gakutei, 9; Gekko, 125; Hanzan, 1 
Harumasa, 1 ; Harunobu, 32 ; Harushige, 1 ; Hidemaro, 1 
Hirokage, 1 ; Hirosada, 3 ; Hiroshige, 400 ; Hokkei, 6 
Hokuba, 1 ; Hokui, 1 ; Hokusai, 123 ; Hokushiu, 4 
Hokuyei, 5 ; Ikku, 1 ; Kabukido, 1 ; Kikumaro, 5 ; Kiosai 
6 ; Kiyochika, 12 ; Kiyohiro, 3 ; Kiyomasu, 7 ; Kiyomine, 4 
Kiyomitsu, 4 ; Kiyonaga, 17 ; Kiyonobu, 6 ; Kiyotada, 1 
Kiyotsune, 1 ; Kogyo, 8 ; Koriusai, 18 ; Koson, 8 ; Kuni- 
chika, 3 ; Kunihiro, 3 ; Kunimaru, 1 ; Kunimasa, 3 
Kuninaga, 1 ; Kuninao, 1 ; Kunisada, 57 ; Kuniyasu, 4 
Kuniyoshi, 200 ; Kwanzan, 1 ; Kwazan, 2 ; Kitao Masanobu 
3 ; Okumura Masanobu, 4 ; Riusai Masanobu, 1 ; Masayoshi 
5 ; Masunobu, 2 ; Matahei (after) 1, (drawings by) 2 ; Matora, 
1 ; Moronobu, 2., (after) 1 ; Nagahide, 8 ; Nobukadzu, 1 
Rinsai, 5 ; Riokoku. 3 ; Riosetsu, 2 ; Sadahide, 4 ; Sadahiro 
1 ; Sadakage, 1 ; Sadanobu, 3 ; Seido, 1 ; Sekijo, 1 ; Setsuro 

1 ; Sharaku, 2 ; Shibakokan, 1 ; Shigeharu, 1 ; Shigemasa, 

2 ; Shigenaga, G ; Shigenobu, 6 ; Shikimaro, 1 ; Shiko, 2 
Shinsai, 3 ; Shucho, 1 ; Shuncho, 6 ; Shundo, 1 ; Shunjo, 2 
Shunkio, 1; Shunko, 6; Shunman, 5'; Shunsen, 6; Shunsho 
32; Shunsui, 1; Shuntei, 4; Miyagawa Shuntei, 19 
Shunto, 1 ; Shunyei, 20 ; Shunzan, 5 ; Shusei, 1 ; Soraku 
1 ; Sori, 2 ; Sugakudo, 1 ; Sukenobu, 7 ; Taito, 1 ; Tofu, 1 
Torin, 1 ; Tosen, 1 ; Toshiaki, 1 ; Toshihide, 25 ; Toshikata 
51 ; Toshinobu, 2 ; Toyoharu, 4 ; Toyohide, 1 ; Toyohiro, 17 

105. D 



50 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Toyokuni I., 53 ; Toyokuni II. (Toyoshige), 5 ; Toyokuni 
III., 1; Toyomaru, 1; Toyonobu, 4; Tsukimaro, 1; Uta- 
maro I., 50 ; Utamaro II., 2 ; Yeiri, 1; Yeisen, 38; Yeishi, 
20; Yeisho, 5 ; Yeishosai, 1 ; Yeisui, 1 ; Yeizan, 12 ; Yoshi- 
iku, 1 ; Yoshikadzu, 5 ; Yoshitova, 2 ; Yoskitoshi, 136 ; 
Zeshin, 11 ; miscellaneous, 43 ; in all comprising 1,851 prints 
on 2,101 sheets. This collection was formed by Mr. Morrison 
during a period of many years with the help of the best 
Japanese experts, all but first-rate examples in fine early 
states being excluded ; so that, though there exist much 
larger collections, there are very few of more uniformly 
high and select quality, or better fitted to form the nucleus 
of a standard series for the historical and technical study 
of this very important branch of Japanese popular art. 



Portraits. 
Foreign. 
Bourignon, Antoinette ; by P. van Gunst ; on vellum. 
Mozart, Johann Wolfgang ; when a boy ; etching by 
C. Schiitz. 

English. 

Burgess, Daniel ; by J. Drapentier. Presented by 
A. Bowditch, esq. 

Goldsmith, Oliver ; after Bunbury, by E. J. Bretherton ; 
etching. 

Nelson, Horatio, Viscount ; after L, Abbott, by W. 
Barnard ; mezzotint. 

History. 

The coronation banquet of George IV. ; anonymous 
aquatint ; printed in colours. 

Caricatures. 

Thirty seven political and social satires, 18th century. 
Presented^ by Alfred Boiuditch, esq. 



Playing Cards. 

A French Gee-graphical pack, the suits representing the 
four quarters of the globe; designed by N. Poilly, Paris 
1763 ; wanting the 7 of 'Africa. 



Bookplates. 

Six plates executed by Capt. Nevile U. Wilkinson for 
Mary, Duchess of Roxburghe, Viscountess Brackley, the 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, 51 

Earl of Durham, Robert S. Gardiner, and Marion Wilson. 
Presented by the Artist. 

Plate of Thomas de Grey, brother of William, first Lord 
Walsingham, who changed the torteaux-in-chief to annulets 
gules. Presented ly Lord Walsingham. 

Plate of Mrs, Alec Tweedie ; designed by Walter Crane 
and engraved bj^ A. and E. Leverett. Presented by Mrs. Alec 
Tweedie. 

Plate of Rev. S. E. V. Filleul; by T. Moring, 1902. 
Presented by Rev. 8. E. V. Filleul. 

Plate of Susannah Oxenham ; two impressions. Presented 
by Airs. Oxenham. 

Books of Prints and Books of Reference. 

Bouchot, Henri. " L'Exposition des Primitifs Frangais " ; 
liv. 1-4, with 100 plates. 

Burgkmair, H., and A. Vogtherr. A set of eighty-seven 
etchings of the arms of Augsburg families, with frontispiece, 
(Pass, iii, 285, 3). Presented by an anonymous donor 
through the National Art Collections Fund. 

Eisenmann, Oscar. " Die Konigliche Gemalde-Galerie 
zu Cassel." 

Gower, Lord Ronald. " George Romney," 1904. 

Hamel, Maurice. " Les Salons de 1905." 

Henderson, Thomas F. "James I. and VI.," 1904. 

Holmes, Sir Richard R. Drawings by Holbein at 
Windsor ; reproduced by Hanfstaengl ; 2nd series. 

Huttichius. '•' Imperatorum et C^esarum Vitse " ; W. 
Koppel, Strasburg, 1534, 4to ; with title border and 
numerous ornaments throughout by Hans Weiditz. 

Presented by Gampbell Dodgson, esq. 

Jacobsen, E., and P. N. Ferri. " Neuentdeckte Michelangelo- 
Zeichnungen in den Uffizien zu Florenz " ; with 24 plates ; 
1905. 

Jessopp, A., J, -Jl. Gotch, J, Lr -Caw, and A. Fox-Davies. 
" William Cecil, Lord Burghley," 1904. 

Lens, Bernard. " Bowles's New Preceptor in Drawing," 
with frontispiece and 61 plates. 

Mauclair, CamilJe. "Jean Baptiste Greuze," 1905. 

Menpes, Mortimer. " Whistler as I knew him," 1904. 

Pruthenius, Ludovicus. " Trilogium animse," Nuremberg, 
1498. Presented by the National Art Collections Fund. 

Robaut. Alfred. " L'Q^uvre de Corot," tom. 3 and 4, 
1905. 

D 2 



52 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM, 

Servaes, Franz. "Giovanni Segantini, sein Leben unci 
sein Werk," J 902. 

Simonson, George A. " Francesco Guavdi," 1904. 

Steinmann. " Die Sixtinische Kapelle," Band II. ; with 
portfolio of 70 plates. 

Steinmeyer, Vincent. " Newe Kiinstliche Wohlgerissene 
und in Holtz geschnittene Figuren"; Frankfurt-am-Main, 
1G20 ; woodcuts chiefly by Hans Weiditz. Presented by the 
National Art Collections Fund. 

Vachon, Marius. " William Bouguereau," 1900. 

Vegetius " Vier blicher der Rytterschafft," Erfurt, 
]511, fol. ; with anonymous woodcuts. Presented by Max 
Rosenheim, esq., F.S.A. 

" Das Concilium zu Constanz," Augsburg, 1536 ; with 
woodcuts by J. Breu. Presented by Max Rosenheir)i, esq., 
F.S.A. 

"Costume of Yorkshire," 1814; forty aquatints by 
R. Havell after G. Walker ; in two states ; coloured. 

*' Biblia Sacra " ; with 100 plates after mxodern artists. 

" Handzeichnungen alter Meister zu Berlin *' ; Lief. 

XIII-XVI. 

" French Art from Watteau to Prud'hon," vol. u 

" L'Qiluvre de James McNeill Whistler," liv. 1; with 
20 plates. 

Sidney Calvin. 



EGYPTIAN' AND ASSriiLAN ANTIQUITIES. 



Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities. 

I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, ^c. 
Egyptian Antiquities : — 

The general re-arrangement of the Egyptian Collections 
has been continued and the greater number of the important 
objects acquired during the year have been incorporated and 
exhibited. 

The re-arrangement of the Egyptian Galleries has been 
continued. The stelae have been grouped in chronological 
order, and the labelling and re-labelling have been continued. 
A considerable number of statues, sarcophagus covers, etc. 
have been repaired. Stone shelves have been built into 
several of the bays in both Galleries, and the wall space 
which is now available for exhibition purposes is nearly 
doubled. 

Thirty-three temporary Caen stone plinths have been 
worked and placed in position ; eighteen granite shelves 
and plinths have been shortened and re-used ; seventy-eight 
alabaster plinchs have been worked and polished, and bronze 
figures of gods and sacred animals have been mounted upon 
them ; ten oak stelse frames, seventeen pedestals in stone 
and wood, and four plinths have been made, and figures 
and other objects have been mounted upon them. 

One thousand three hundred and forty-eight scarabs have 
been mounted on cloth-covered plinths, and to one thousand 
and forty-six of them pin-numbers have been attached. Two 
hundred and sixty objects have been boxed. 

Three large statues of Usertsen III. have been repaired, 
and their fragments re-joined and plugged ; the cover of a 
sarcophagus has been repaired ; one hundred and fifty-eight 
ushabtiu and other figures have been repaired and cleaned ; 
the fragments of three stelai have been re-joined. 

Large tablet numbers have been painted and fixed in 
the bays of the Egyptian Galleries, and sixty large labels 
have been made. 

Four hundred and twenty-four descriptive labels have 
been written and painted, and attached to the objects ; and 
two thousand four hundred and twenty numbers have been 
painted on antiquities, &c. 

The transcribing of hieratic papyri has been continued. 
One thousand one hundred and seventy-three objects have 
been registered. One hundred and nine descriptive slips for 
the Guide to the Egyptian Gallery have been written. 
Catalogue slips for one hundred and forty-four Ptah-Seker- 
Asar figures and twelve v/ooden stelse have been written. 



54) ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE EIlITISH MUSEUM. 

Two thousand two liundred and nine slips for a Cata- 
logue of Scarabs have been written, one hundred and 
seventy-eight have been re-written, and one thousand and 
twenty-five have been revised for printing. 

Six thousand and seventy-eight index slips and an index- 
slip list of the Egyptian gods have been written. Two 
hundred and fifty objects, the numbers of which were 
obliterated, have been identified. 

Assyrian Antiquities : — 

The general re-arrangement of the unexhibited section 
of the Babylonian and Assyrian collections has been con- 
tinued. Three hundred and ninety-one tablets have been 
boxed, and number labels added. 

Fifty-three descriptive labels have been written and 
painted on plinths ; thirty-four case-tablets have been 
opened, and the fragments of the cases re-joined ; three 
hundred and ninety tablets have been cleaned and repaired ; 
two hundred and forty-five number tablets have been written 
and fixed; casts of sixty-four seal-cylinders have been 
made> etc. 

Two thousand one hundred and forty-one tablets have 
been registered. Sixty-three tablets have been copied for 
publication. 

The preparation of a complete edition of the great 
trilingual inscription of Darius at Behistim is in progress, 
and sixteen sheets have been printed off", 

Indexes to Parts HI., IV. and V. of " Cuneiform Texts " 
have been made ; seven hundred and twenty-two " K " num- 
bers have been entered in the registers ; and the entries in 
the case-books have been kept up to date. 

Publications. — Parts XXII. and XXIII. of " Cuneiform 
Texts from Babylonian Tablets, &c. in the British Museum," 
have been compiled and issued. 

Students. — -About 2,668 visits have been made to the 
Department by students and others; and 4,121 objects have 
been issued for their use. 

Personally Conducted Parties. — Fifty-eight parties, 
comprising about eleven hundred and three persons have 
been personally conducted through the Department by 
members of the stafi". The parties came from institutions, 
educational and social clubs, schools, &c., at Bayswater, 
Clapton, Dulwich, Hornsey, Islington, Holloway, Highbury, 
New Cross, Ratcliff'e, Walthamstow, Westbourne Park, 
"Westminster, Winchmore Hill, and other parts of London. 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 55 

II. — A cquisitions. 
Egyptian :— 

i. A collection of 854 scarabs, inscribed with the names 
and titles of 39 of the greatest kings of Egypt ; 
they cover the period which begins with the reign 
of Cheops, and ends with that of Nectanebus II. 
(about B c. 354). In this collection about 28 
scarabs belong to the Hyksos Period, 61 to the 
XVIlIth dynasty, 42 to the XXth dynasty, and 
several to the Old Kingdom. Among those which 
belong 10 the Xlllth dynasty, or thereabouts, 
occur the rare names of Mer-kheper-Rri, Maa-ab- 
Ra, Sekha-en-Ra, Neka-Ra, Aa-neter-Ra, &;c. 
Among kings of the XlXth dynasty, Seti-Mene- 
phthah is unusually well represented. Of the 
group of scarabs of private persons may be 
mentioned those of the high Hyksos official, Heru, 
and Amen-hetep, son of Hapu, and the high-priest 
of Heliopolis The collection is of great interest 
archa3ologically, and contains a large number of 
line examples of the Delta class of scarabs. 

ii,— 1. Large limestone stele, in the form of a door 
sculptured on both sides. On the one side the 
deceased Ra-men-kheper is seen adoring Ra- 
Harmachis, and on the other he adores Osiris. 
Below are smaller reliefs in which the son of the 
deceased is represented performing ceremonies on 
behalf of his father. XlXth dynasty, B.C. 1350. 

2. Kneeling stone statue of the priest Pata-Ast, 

holding a shrine containing a figure. XVIIIth or 
XlXth dynasty, B.C. 1450-1350.' 

3. Large flat bronze vessel with a lip inscribed with 

the prenomen of Tut-ankh-Amen, king of Egypt. 
About B.C. 1450. 

4. Two blue-glazed porcelain libation jars inscribed 

with the name of Amen-hetep II. About B.C. 
1500. 

5. Bronze ring inscribed with a figure of Ptah. 

XVIIIth dynasty. 

6. Bronze ring inscribed with the name of Amen-Ra. 

XVIIIth dynasty. 

7. Crystal scarab. Xllth dynasty. 

8. Hard green stone scarab. 

9. Three green-glazed scarabs on one base. XTIth 

dynasty. 

10. Mottled stone scarab in ring. XlXth dynasty. 

11. Bronze figure of Sebek, wearing disk. Rare 

example. 



56 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

12. Bronze triad of lioness goddesses, Sekhet, Menhi, 

and Tefnut. Rare example. 

13. Group in bronze ; bitch with young. Rare example. 

14. Gnostic amulet in jasper. 

15. Large bier cloth, ornamented with human and other 

figures worked on a coloured ground with rosettes, 
&c. About A.D. 500. 

16. Coptic inscription. 

Wooden writing case, with decorated reed pens. 

Artists' palette in ornamented leather, with a 
support for the wrist, water-vessel, and cavities 
for the reed brushes. These objects were found 
at Akhmim, and belong, probably, to the Vlllth 
century A.D. 

iii. — 1. Limestone stele, -sculptured with figures of the 
deceased praying to the Day- Sun and the Night- 
Sun, and inscribed with the text of a hymn in 
16 lines, which contain unusual spelling of hiero- 
glyphic words. About B.C. 400. 

2. Granite sepulchral stele, with a bilingual inscrip- 

tion in hieroglyphics and demotic ; above is a 
figure of the deceased worshipping six gods. 
Ptolemaic Period. 

3. Large sandstone stele inscribed with 11 lines of 

text recording the dedication of certain offerings 
to the Cow-goddess Hathor at Karnak, by the 
Emperor Tiberius. On the upper part of the stele 
is a figure of the Emperor standing before the 
goddess. 

4. Granite base of a statue inscribed with the car- 

touches of Queen Shep-en-Apt, Amenartas, and 
Piankhi. About B.C. 700. 

5. Large red and white mottled stone bowl of the 

Archaic Period. About B.C. 4000. 

6. Arragonite bowl. Archaic Period. About B.C. 

4000. 

7. Two models of a hippopotamus in flint. Archaic 

Period. 

8. Porcelain handle of a sistrum dedicated to Thoth 

by a king. XXVIth dynasty. 

9. Granite figure of a Cynocephalus ape. About 

B.C. 800. 
10. Lapis-lazuli scarab of the singing-woman Hent. 
About B.C. 1200. 

"11. A group of 32 scarabs inscribed with the names of 
high officials who flourished during the first six 
dynasties ; many are of considerable archaeological 
importance. From Sakkarah. 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 57 

12. Scarab of the lion hunts of Amen-hetep III. 

About B.C. 1450. 

13. Scarab of Amen-hetep III. and Queen Thi. 

14. A fine linen model shirt, with a figure of the Cow- 

goddess Hathor worked in it. B.C. 1500. 

15. Three glazed and painted vases. Roman Period. 

16. Bowl in fine bronze^ with grotesque heads as handles. 

Roman Period (J). 

17. Circular object in mother-of-emerald, inscribed 

with the name of a Roman Emperor in hiero- 
glyphics. 

18. An altar, with an inscription in demotic on the 

edge. 

19. Three inscribed Gnostic gems. 

20. A collection of glass beads of the Roman Period. 

21. Limestone base of a pillar, which has been hollowed 

out and made to serve as the apse of a small shrine 
in a Coptic church. The decoration consists of 
birds, plants, &c. in low relief. Vllth to IXth 
century A.D. 

22. Two Coptic stelaj. IXth century A.D. 

— 1. A hard dark granite statue of Sen-Mut, the famous 
architect and builder of the temple Tcheser 
Tcheseru, i.e., the " Holiest of the Holy," of Queen 
Hatshepset, who reigned over Egypt about B.C. 
1550. Sen-Mut was the " Chief of Works " in all 
Egypt, the " Chief Craftsman of every trade," and 
he was the Overseer of the House wherein the 
tribute in gold paid by the Sudan was stored. 
The Queen adopted male attributes and attire, and 
she appears in this statue as the " Young Horus," 
whom the architect holds on his knees. 

2. A glazed porcelain draught-board, one end of which 
is ornamented with two ducks' heads, with their 
beaks in opposite directions. One row of squares 
is ornamented with the hawk of Horus, two 
symbols for " god," three symbols for " god," the 
sign for " water," and three nefers, i.e., triple 
"good luck," or "game." The other squares on 
this sid3 are blank. On the other side each square 
contains a circle, with the centre clearly marked 
by a dot. One end of the board is broken. The 
object was found at Babylon. (No. 102,396.) 

8. Glazed stone scarab set as a bezel in a gold ring. 
XVlIIth dynasty, B.C. 1600. 

4. Lion-headed earring in gold. Ptolemaic Period. 



58 accounts, etc., of the british museum. 

Assyrian : — 

1. Large inscribed baked clay cone of Samsu-iluna, King 

of Babylon, about B.C. 2145. The inscription, which 
is in seven columns, commemorates the rebuilding of 
the great wall which surrounded the city of Sippar 
in Babylonia. The king states that he undertook 
the work at the direct command of Shamash the 
Sun-God, the patron deity of Sippar, and of Mar- 
duk the god of the city of Babylon, his capital ; 
and he declares that, by their help, he brought the 
work to a successful issue. The inscription also 
contains a long list of the king's titles, and it describes 
his achievements, and the special favour which was 
shown to him by the Sun-God and his wife Aa, the 
centre of whose worship was in E-Babbara, the great 
temple of the Sun in Sippar. 

This cone is a foundation memorial, and was found 
buried in a wall. It is the largest example of the 
class now known, and is a very valuable addition to 
the memorial inscriptions of the First Dynasty of 
Babylon, which are exceedingly i-are. 

2. Two tablets of accounts, inscribed with lists of 

labourers and their children, &c., drawn up in the 
reign of Uru-kagina, an early king of Shirpurla. 
About B.C. 4500. 

3. A collection of 169 tablets of accounts, business 

receipts, and memoranda inscribed in Sumerian. 
They belong to the period of the kings of Ur, 
about B.C. 2400. Among them is a large tablet of 
accounts inscribed with lists of labourers and slaves 
employed upon some of the great temple estates in 
the neighbourhood of the city of Shirpurla. The 
tablet is dated in " the year in which the city of 
Kimash was destroyed." 

4. A collection of forty-eight tablets belonging to the 

period of the First Dynasty of Babylon, about 
B.C. 2200-2000. The greater number are inscribed 
with legal and commercial agreements, memoranda, 
&;c. One tablet is dated in the reign of Abeshu, 
king of Babylon, about bo. 2110. Ten tablets are 
dockets, which were attached by pieces of straw to 
legal agreements, which were drawn up in "the 
year the canal of Samsu-iluna was cut," i.e., in the 
third or fourth year of the reign of Samsu-iluna, 
king of Babylon, about B.C. 2145. 

5. A collection of ninety -eight tablets inscribed during 

the Neo-Babylonian and Persian Periods, from 
B.C. 550-485. The texts consist of receipts, business 
agreements, legal contracts, accounts, lists, memo- 
randa, &c. The greater number of the tablets 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 59 

belong to the reign of Darius, B.C. 521-485 ; some 
are dated in the reigns of Nabonidus, B.C. 555-5.S8, 
and Cambyses, B.C. 529-521. One tablet in this 
collection is inscribed with a letter from the Judges, 
probably of Sippar, to a certain man called Nidinti, 
with reference to a complaint made by Shuba 
about one of their legal decisions. 

6. White limestone cylinder seal of Shamshi-Adad, the 

son of Shalmaneser II., and grandson of Ashur- 
nasir-pal, King of Assyria from B.C. 825-8] 2. 

7. Persian lapis-lazuli seal of Adad-Nirari, the son of 

Shamshi-Adad, King of Assyria, from B.C. 812-783. 

8. Limestone slab, sculptured with the figures of two bow- 

men ; it was one of the series which lined a corridor 
in a palace of one of the later kings of Assyria. 
About B.C. 050. 

9. Limestone slab sculptured with the figure of the 

eagle-headed deity, who performed a very important 
ceremony in connexion with the fertilizing of the 
palm tree in Babylonia. It was brought from a 
side gallery in the palace of Ashur-nasir-pal 
(B.C. 885-860) at Nimrud. 

10. Limestone slab sculptured with the head of King 

Ashur-nasir-pal ; it was cut from one of the large 
slabs which lined the hall of this king's palace at 
Nimrud. 

11. Lapis-lazuli cone, on which are cut figures of the 

crescent moon, a man-headed bull, and a scorpion- 
man. About B.C. 650. The figure of the scorpion- 
man is of interest, as it rarely occurs. According 
to the Ninth Tablet of the Gilgarnesh Series, the 
" Gate of the Mountains of Mashu," i.e., the Sunset, 
was guarded by two scorpion-men, at the sight of 
whom men died. 

12. A carefully cut lapis-lazuli seal, whereon are figures 

of gods, and of a man and animals in conflict. An 
unusually good specimen in lapis-lazuli. 

13. An archaic soft limestone cylinder seal, with figures 

of gods, animals, &c. in relief. About B.C. 3750. 

14. A group of seventeen cylinder seals in white stone, or 

shell limestone, whereon are cut figures of animals, 
gods, &c. of an unusual character. Some of these 
are valuable for purposes of comparison with the 
cylinder seals of the Archaic Period from Egypt. 
B.C. 8800-3500. 

15. Carneiian bugle bead inscribed with the name of 

Dungi, King of Babylonia. B.C. 2400. 



60 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE liEITISH MUSEUM. 

16. A group of eleven haematite cylinder seals, of the 

period B.C. 2200-1500. Six are inscribed with 
names, thus : — 

Amil-Martu, son of Ilu-Shemi. 

Ibni-Marduk, son of Taribatum. 

Ablatum, son of Adad-Shemi. 

Adad, son of Anna. 

Makhaditum. 

Sham as and Ai. 

17. Agate cylinder seal. About B.C. 800. 
Amethyst cylinder seal. About B.C. 650. 
Lapis-lazuli cylinder seal. About B.C. 500. 
Chalcedony cone, &c. About B.C. 500. 

18. Glazed steatite scarab, of Elamite design and work. 

Period doubtful. 

HiMYARITIC : — 

Portion of a long inscription recording the dedication of 
a building to the god Al-Mokah ; it appears to belong 
to the period about B.C. 700, and was found among some 
ruins in the north of Hadramaut. 

III. — Presents. 

i. — 1, Yellow marble figure of an official or priest. Period 
uncertain. From Hadramaut. 

2. Portions of four Himyaritic inscriptions, cut in 
relief upon marble. The texts refer to the dedi- 
cation of certain buildings to the god Al-Mokah. 
About B.C. 700. 
Presented by H.R.H. The Duchess of Connaught. 

ii. A group of fragments of reliefs, &c., from the Temple 
of Neb-hapt-Ra, a king of the Xlth dynasty, from 
Der al-Bahari : — 

1. Fragment of the Ka name of Menthu-hetep. 

2. Fragment of the cartouche of Menthu-hetep. 

3. Fragment (Neb-hapt-Ra). 

4. Fragment of a relief : a king seated, and holding 

a staff. 

5. Fragment of a relief : a prince with his 

tutors. 

6. Fragment. The warrior Kheti holding a bow. 

7. Fragment. Warrior with square - headed 

arrows. 

8. Fragment. Warrior holding a round-bladed 

axe. 

9. Fragment. Inscription of the Judge Dak. 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. Gl 

10. Frugment. Slain Aamu froiii Sinaitic Penin- 

sula. 

11. Fragment. War against the Aamu. 

12. Fragment. Scribe with palette. 

13. Fragment. Vulture. 

14. Fragment. Goddess Hathor. 

15. Fragment. Two men driving cattle. 
IG. Fragment. Man gathering weeds. 

17. Fragment. Head of a calf, in relief. 

18. Fragment. Procession of boats. 

19. Fragment. A shrine in a boat : the King 

dancing at the Set Festival. 

20. Fragment, ibis catching fish. 

21. Fragment. Hippopotamus in the marshes. 

22. Fragment. Procession ; courtieis bowino-. 

23. Fragment. Part of a procession. 

24-27. Fragments of the painted stone coffin of a 
priestess. 

28. Osiride head of King Menthu-hetep. 

29. Figure of a woman. 

30. Inscription containing the name Amen. 

31. Fragment. Amen embracing a king. 

32. Fragment of an inscription. 

33. 34. Cartouches of Menthu-hetep. 
35, 36. Two jar-sealings. 

iii. Objects of the XT.Ith and later dynasties : — 

1. Fragment of a cartouche of a king called 

Usertsen. 

2. Relief with the figure of Prince Sa-Hathor. 

XYIIIth dynasty. 

3. Fragment of a relief with the name of the 

Temple of King Thothmes I. 

4. Fragment of an inscription from the Great 

Temple. XVIIIth dynasty. 

5. Fragment of a relief ; sepulchral offerings. 

6. Relief with a figure of the god Set. XlXth 

dynasty. 

7. Cartouche of King Rameses IX. XXth 

dynasty. 

8. White limestone portrait head. 

9. Stone bowh made from an ancient relief. 
JO. Bowl fragment, with finely cut inscription. 



62 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

11. Cover of an alabastron inscribed with the 

cartouche of Queen Hatshepset. 

12. Votive cloths painted with figures of the 

goddess Hathor. 

13. Stone head of Hathor, with hawks. 

14. A group of blue-glazed porcelain Hathor heads. 

15. Blue-glazed porcelain : figure of a lion. 

16. Blue-glazed porcelain : fragments of vases. 

17. A group of amulets. 

18. Fragment of a glass vase. 

19. Yellow-glazed ball. 

20. Pottery rings. 

21. Wooden ankh amulet. 

22. Wooden reel, with string. 

23. Wooden mallet. 

24. 25. Wooden spatulas. 

26. Bronze rod. 

27. Earthenware jar, with cords for suspending it. 

28. Vase-ring of basket-work. 

29. Basket. 

30. Piece of matting ; herring-bone pattern. 

31. Cloth bag. 

32. Pieces of cloth with wool embroidery. 

33. Piece of thick, heavy rope. 

33. Papyrus plant, shells, «Sz;c. 

34. A group of hieratic graffiti. 

35. A collection of demotic and Coptic ostraka. 

36. Fragment of inscribed mummy cloth ; Roman 

Period. 

iv. Objects of the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods from 
Bahnasa and Al-Hiba : — 

1. Porcelain cat. 

2. Lamp, with ten burners. 

3. Blue-glazed tessera, with head of Bes, and 

an utchat eye in relief. 

4. A group of fragments of coloured glass. 

5. Green glass head. 

6. Ivory pins, dice, &;c. 

7. Bronze scoop, iron ladle, and iron keys. 

8. Small lead cross ; Coptic. 

9. Inscribed bone. 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 63 

10. Greek ostrakon (letter). Vlth century a.d. 

11. Reed pen. 

12. Fragments of a pottery cup, with vine 

leaves in relief. 

J'resented by the Egyft Exploration Fund, 1906. 
E. A. Wallis Budge. 



64 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE l^RITLSH MUSEUM. 



Department or Greek and Roman Antiquities. 



I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, &c. 

In the Terracotta Room the new cases on the South side 
have been completed, and the terracottas have been replaced 
in them ; pending the completion of the corresponding cases 
on the North side, the remaining terracottas have been tem- 
porarily withdrawn- The room hitherto called the Etruscan 
Saloon has undergone an entire re-arrangement with a view 
to the provision of space for the exhibition of a series of 
objects illustrating the Public and Private Life of the Greeks 
and Romans. Considerable progress ha.s been made with the 
arrangement of objects for this exhibition. The terracotta 
mural reliefs have been mounted on wooden doors fixed 
within the cases, the object of this arrangement being to 
render fresh storage space available. The two large terra- 
cotta sarcophagi from the Etruscan Saloon have been moved 
into the Terracotta Room, while many of the bronzes have 
been transferred to the Bronze Room, where the cases have 
also undergone considerable alteration with a view to a 
re-arrangement of the bronzes. In the Fourth Vase Room a 
table case has been specially fitted for the exhibition of 
Greek and Italian vases with moulded designs. Casts of 
several fragments have been procured from Athens and fitted 
to the Parthenon Frieze. A re-arrangement of the sculpLures 
in the Phigaleian Room has been made, and alterations have 
been carried out in the Frieze in order to distinguish clearly 
between the originals and the restorations. A series of 
pictures illustrative of the sculptures has been framed and 
placed in the Elgin and Phigaleian Rooms. The walls and 
ceiling of the Ephesus Room have been re -painted, and the 
sculptures have been moved for the purpose. The Choiseul- 
Goufiier statue of Apollo has been removed from the Ante- 
Room (where new wall-cases are being fitted), and placed in 
the Archaic Room. A new door has been made giving access 
to the Inscription Room from the Mausoleum Annexe ; the 
inscriptions in the former room have been re-arranged. In 
the Hall of Inscriptions the plaster cast of a restored capital 
has been placed on the inscribed pier from Priene. 

The objects found in the excavations at Ephesus have 
been temporarily exhibited in the Medal Room Lobby. 

A series of 46 labels giving a more detailed account of the 
principal sculptures has been printed in the Department, and 
aftixed to the pedestals in metal frames. 

Twenty-five new moulds and 4 new marble pedestals have 
been made for the Department. One marble vase, 4 heads, 
1 marble foot, part of a marble chair, 7 votive tablets, and 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 65 

6 miscellaneous pieces of sculpture have been mounted on 
marble or stone ; 41 bronzes, 27 vases, 81 terracottas, 18 
ivories mounted on wooden blocks ; 9 drawings and plans 
framed. Three hundred and sixty sloping blocks have been 
made for labels. 

Fifty-five bronzes, 99 terracottas, 67 vases, 33 ivories, 
13 lamps, 80 rings, 27 silver objects, and numerous miscel- 
laneous antiquities have been cleaned and repaired. 

Six hundred and forty-eight objects have been registered ; 
573 labels written ; 1,826 objects numbered. 

A new edition of the Guide to the Sculptures of the 
Parthenon has been issued. Progress has been made with 
the printing of the Catalogue of Roman Pottery and the 
Catalogue of Rings ; with the preparation of revised editions 
of the Catalogue of Gems and of the Guide to the Depart- 
ment. Progress has also been made with the preparation of 
the plates of the Parthenon Sculptures and the account of 
the British Museum Excavations at Ephesus. 

The number of visits to the Departmental Library for 
purposes of research has been 600; 1,188 other visits to the 
Staff for purposes of inquiry, and 1,758 attendances of 
students in the Sculpture Galleries have been entered. 

Numerous parties of students have visited the Department 
for lectures and demonstrations. 

II. — A cquisitions. 
By Purchase. 

I. — Objects in Gold. 

1. Earring of S-form set with a black jasper engraved on 
either side. Obverse : head of Mercury ; reverse : scorpion. 
Late Roman. 

2. Earring as last. The black jasper is engraved on one 
side only with a helmeted head of Minerva. 

1, 2 were found at Episkopi, Cyprus. 

3. Pair of earrings in the form of disks with pendent 
amphorae. They are set with emeralds and garnets, and are 
attached to one another by a fine plaited chain. See 
Froehner,^ Coll. Tyszkiewicz, 183, pi. xxiii. (Paris, 1898) = 
pi. xi., 9 (Munich, 1892-1898). 

4. Pair of earrings, each consisting of a rosette of 51 petals, 
from which is suspended an inverted pyramid surmounted by 
a dove. From Cyprus. 

II. — Silver. 
1. Silver-gilt disk with design in relief : Helios in quad- 
riga rising above the horizon, below which are two dolphins 
plunging. From a tomb at Elis. Cf. Pollak, Goldschmiedearb., 
pi. XX., 533. 

105. E 



66^ ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

2. Oval plate (probably from the bezel of a ring) with 
engraved design ; head of Hadrian, laureate, surrounded by an 
inscription, KaXiinrog ixp^uiv ^ASpi{avov) Kattrajoocw 

3. Hook. The lower part of the shank is bound round 
with wire, the upper part is broken away. Excavated about^ 
1830 from a tomb at Marathon. 

III. — Bronze. 

1. Bangle of three coils with a knob at each end. 

2. Bracelet formed of two pieces of bronze which overlap 
at one end and are joined together at the other by a strip of 
bronze wound round them. 

3. Bracelet consisting of a flat piece of metal with 
overlapping ends. 

1-3 were excavated about 1830 from a tomb at Marathon. 

. 4. Statuette of a woman in long Ionic chiton, holding her 
skirt with her left hand. Sixth cent. B.C. Acquired in 
Bergen, Norway, and said to have been found near that town 
with three Italian fibulae. See Journ. Hell. Stud., 1906, 
p. 284 f . 

5. Statuette of nude youth of early " Apollo " type. 
Found at Kalyvia in Attica, latter part of sixth cent. B.C. 
Peloponnesian style. 

6. Statuette of Eros wearing winged cap of Hermes and 
carrying a purse. 

7. Pair of clappers (KpoToXa) with rings and chain for 
holding. Inscribed in dotted letters: (a) IIATAZEIMI, 
narag 6t/xf, (b) HATAZEIMI and 12 ATA. Cf. Arch. Zeit, 
1876, p. 28, pi. 5. 

8. Statuette of Autumn standing and holding fruits 
placed in the folds of an animal's skin attached to his right 
shoulder and thrown over his left arm. Gallo-Roman style. 

9. Mirror with design in relief on the cover, representing 
an Amazon attacking a helmeted warrior. He has fallen on 
his right knee, and with his left hand holds up his shield to 
ward off the blow ; his right hand holds a spear (modelled 
separately). 

10. Disk, silvered on the concave side ; to this "has been 
attached a relief, representing a bearded mask wearing a 
Phrygian cap. 

11. Disk, as last, with a mask of Seilenos in relief. 

12. Disk, as last, with a mask of a young Satyr in relief. 

13. Relief representing a bearded man, wearing a Phrygian 
cap, and a woman, both standing in a quadriga driven to the 
front. 

14. Relief representing an Amazon wearing a winged 
Phrygian cap and carrying axe and bow in her left hand. 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 67 

15. Lunate ornament with palmette design in relief. 

16. Foot of a cista modelled in the form of a Sphinx 
seated on a scroll above a lion's foot. 

9-16 are from tombs at Elis, 

17. Statuette of Herakles standing, with club and lion's 
skin supported on his left arm. 

IV. — Engraved Gems. 

1. Sard intaglio : head of Ariadne, wearing ivy wreath, 
within a cable border. Found on the surface at Poli-tis- 
Chrysokhou, Cyprus. 

2. Sard intaglio : head of youthful Herakles with lion's 
skin knotted about his shoulders. Behind his head is a star ; 
in front, inscribed "Epiog. 

3. Sard scarab intaglio : bull wounded by a spear which 
sticks in his back. Cable border. 

4. Carnelian scarab intaglio : huntsman skinning an 
animal. Meaningless letters in the field. Cable border. 

5. Onyx intaglio (set in modern gold ring) : two men 
before a tree, from which hangs a ram's head. The one 
kneels and holds a serpent over a flaming altar, the other 
stands and holds a small image (?). 

6. Chalcedony bust of a woman in high relief. She wears 
the costume of a priestess of Isis. Possibly a Roman Empress 
in that character. 

Y.— Marble, &c. 

1. Head of Meleager on modern bust. Ancient replica of 
a Greek original of the 4th cent. B.C. See Burlington 
Fine Arts Club Gat., 1904, No. 14, pi. xiv. ; Journ. Hell. 
Stud., 1885, p. 38, No. 27. 

2. Pyxis of graceful form. It is on a tall stem, and is 
decorated round the body with moulded rims. The lid has a 
tapering handle. Fifth to fourth cent. B.C. 

3. Fragment of a Greek inscription recording the rules of 
a i^^iasos or private association. From the Peirseus. About 
the third cent. B.C. 

4. Stone shrine with gable top. On the front are the 
remains of a painted scene. 

5. Marble sarcophagus, with the representation of a lock 
carved on its front. On the pyramidal cover is inscribed : 
EnilEPEnznAN4>IAOYMHTPOAnPOZAPTEMIAnP 

OYPIEPIPANTHZ, lirl <c/)£wc nav(})iXov MrjrpoSwpog 
'AprE/xtSwpou TTEpipavTr^g. UepipavTr^g is apparently a new 
word ; cf., however, the wepipavTrtpiov of a Delphi inscription 
{Bull, de Gorr. Hell, XXL, p. 483). Said to have been 
excavated in the ruins of the temple of Kybele at Sardis. 

E 2 



68 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

W.— Terracotta. 

1. Statuette of a woman in long chiton. She wears a 
diadem, and raises her hands towards her head. On the 
back is incised MHNO, Mi]vo[(/)iXou k'pyov (?)]. Cf. Pettier 
et Reinach, Necr. de Myrina, I., pp. 178, 188. 

2. Statuette of a nude girl, seated. Her arms are 
movable (pins modern), and in her right hand is an ivory- 
dove, the head of which is lost. Her hair is coloured red. 

3. Chair in which the above figure is seated. It has a 
high back, and the arms rest on two modelled heads of girls, 
whose hair is coloured red. 

4. Models of a pair of boots (eiu^n^eg), the tops and soles 
of which are coloured red. 

5. Model of an instrument {l-KivnTpov or ovog) placed on 
the knee in spinning. It ends in a human head, and is 
decorated with dashes in black. 

6. Model of a vase for lustral water used at wedding 
ceremonies ( Xtj3»]c yafiiKoq). It has double handles and a 
decoration of palmettes. 

2-6 were found together in a girl's tomb, probably near 
Athens. 

7. Statuette of a woman draped with chiton and himation. 
There are traces of blue on the latter. Tanagra style. 

8. Very rudely modelled quadriga (one horse missing). 
In the chariot are the charioteer with a shield on his back 
and another warrior. Perhaps a child's toy. 

9. Group of Eros and Psyche embracing. Eros leans on a 
torch, and Psyche is seated. Below is a rectangular base, 
with a design in relief of Eros riding on a sea-monster. 

10. Statuette of Aphrodite, carrying a mirror in her 
lowered right hand. She wears bracelets, and has drapery 
over her right leg. 

11. Fragment of a disk with Gorgoneion in relief on a 
star-shaped background. 

12. Statuette of Eros draped in a pink mantle. From 
Aegina. 

13. Statuette of a dwarf, wearing mantle and walking to 
left. From Myrina. 

14. Small disk, with bust of Athene in relief. She wears 
a triple-crested helmet. At the back are the remains of 
three bronze loops. There are traces of gilding. 

15. Disk, as last, partly broken away. 

16; Disk, with bust of Athena in relief, wearing triple- 
crested helmet. On either shoulder is a small Nike, fastening 
an earring. 

17. Disk, with Gorgoneion in relief. There are traces of 
gilding. 



GEEEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 69 

18. Disk, as last, partly broken away. 

19. Diminutive relief of Nike flying. She grasps her 
drapery with her lowered hands. 

20-23. Four small reliefs representing a boar hunt. They 
are as follows : (a) huntsman holding spear, dressed in 
pointed cap and cloak ; (6) huntsman in pointed cap, with 
shield on left arm ; (c) group of two hounds running to right ; 
(d) boar at bay, standing to left. 

24. Bust of a draped woman wearing a diadem (?). The 
latter has two holes for suspension. 

25. Statuette of a boy wearing a round cap and a cloak 
fastened on the shoulder by a circular brooch. 

VIL— Pottery. 

1. OcDochoe with trefoil lip and plain handle. It has 
a design painted in white, brown, pink, blue, and gold over 
the black glaze. In the centre is a draped woman, seated to 
right on a high-backed chair, with her head turned round. 
In her left hand she holds a sceptre. Behind her stands 
Dionysos, nude and wreathed, holding a thyrsos in his left 
hand. On either side are winged Erotes, holding a sash and 
a jewel-case respectively Behind the Eros on the right, is a 
woman, winged and draped, holding two torches. The scene 
represented is probably the marriage of the Basilinna with 
Dionysos on the second day of the Anthesteria (cf., Dem., 
c. Neaer., 73 ; Aristot., 'A^. ttoX., 3, 5 ; and Mommsen, Feste 
der Stadt Athen, p. 392 fF.). 

2. Vase in the form of a boy riding sideways on a goat to 
right ; he carries a dish of fruit in his left hand. There are 
remains of green, pink, and red colouring. 

3. Lekytlios, with design in outline on a white ground, 
representing a youth with flutes and a woman with a pyxis 
standing before a sepulchral stele. Inscribed : EYNOMOZ 
KAAOZ. 

4. Vase, in the form of Eros kneeling on his left knee. In 
his right hand he holds an apple. 

\ 111.— Iron. 

1-10. Series of ten arrow-heads. 

11. Buckle of Roman type. 

12-14. Three implements of uncertain use. 

1-14 were excavated about 1830 from a tomb at Marathon. 

By Donation. 

I. Four vases of hucchero nero. From a tomb near 
Rome. 

Presented by Signer Lamherto Longoni. 



0^0 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE B11IT[SH MUSEUM. 

II Terracotta foot from a statuette, with straps of a 
sandal crossing the foot at the base of the toes and running 
up to the instep. 

Presented by M. Georges Manolakos. 

III. A series of fragments of Neolithic, Kamares, and 
Mycenaean ware from excavations at Zakro in Eastern Crete 
and Knossos in Northern Crete. See Annual of Brit. School 
at Athens, VI, p. 70 ff. and VII., p. 121 ff . ; Journ. Hell. 
Stud., 1903, p. 248 ff. 

Presented by D. G. Hogarth, Esq. 

IV. — 1. Amethyst scarab with rounded lower surface 
engraved with a statue of Vertumnus. 

2. Sard scarab with engraved design of nude figure seated 
on a horizontal line, below which hang three amphorae. Cable 
border. Italic work " a globolo." Cf. Furtwangler, Ant. 
Gemm., pi. xix. 35-40, pi. xx. 39, 41. 

Presented by C. J. Wilson, Esq. 

V. A series of thirty-three plaster casts of fragments 
from the Frieze of the Parthenon, taken from the originals 
at Athens. These are intended to complete the Museum 
Series of the Parthenon Frieze. 

Presented by the Greek Government, through 
M. P. Cavvadias, Ephor-General of Antiquities. 

VI. — 1. Fragment of Arretine bowl, with design of leaves 
and rosettes. 

2. Fragment of rim of flat dish, with design in relief of a 
bestiarius or gladiator charging to left. Salmon-coloured 
clay. Unglazed. 

8. Similar fragment, with relief, showing the head of a 
,lion and part of a bestiarius charging. Salmon-coloured clay. 
Unglazed. 

1-3 were found by Prof. W. M. Flinders Petrie at 
Coptos, Egypt, 1894, and presented by 

H. M. Kennard, Esq., Ib06. 

VII. Gold necklace, a modern copy of the original neck- 
lace at Naples, published in Mus. Borb., XVI., pi. xiii. (lower 
of the two). It consists of a chain of plaited wires, from 
which hang rows of pendants in the form of acorns, Seilenos- 
masks, palmettes, and lotus-flowers. 

Presented by Mrs. Eustace Sviith. 

VIII. Head of a man wearing a fillet, made of a compo- 
sition imitating marble. A modern forgery of an archaic 
head. Acquired at Corinth. 

Presented by E. S. Forster, Esq. 



I 



1 



GREEK AND ROMA.N ANTIQUITIES. . 71 

IX. Series of terracotta-gilt ornaments, consisting of 
three disks witb heads of Athene in relief, amphorae, &c. 
They have formed a necklace. Greek work -of the fourth 
€ent. B.C. 

Presented by Cecil H. Smith, Esq, 

X. Bronze handle of a vase decorated with acanthus 
leaves in relief. Found in the same tomb at Tripolitza as 
the bronze lamp mentioned in Brit. Mus. Return, 1906, 
p. 69, Vj = Arch. Anz., 1906, p. 247, 17. 

Presented by M. Joannes Kondylis. 

XI. Marble sepulchral urn decorated with rams' heads, 
gryphons, birds, and garlands in relief, inscribed : Bis 
Manibus. Flavia Tyche vix{it) an^nis) xx. Alexander 
c.ontubernali carissimae. See C,I,L , VI., 18451. Formerly 
in the Capel-Cure Coll. 

Presented by C. J. Charles, Esq. 

XII. — 1. Pointed oval bronze plaque with a relief repre- 
senting Bes (?) squatting. He wears a modius surmounted by 
a plume, and holds a snake in either hand. Their heads are 
confronted above his own, 

2. Series of minute gold tubes, probably for use in 
goldsmith's work. 

Presented by M. E. Triantaphyllos. 

XIII. Bowl, one-handled, of coarse drab ware with remains 
of white slip. On the lip is a spiral pattern in brown, 
and, below, a bordering line in the same. Melian fabric. 
Probably from Phylakopi. Cf. Excavations at Phylakopi, 
pi. xxxiii., 11. 

Presented by A. M. Daniel, Esq. 

XIV. Four fragments of Minoan ware and a terracotta 
loom-weight. From Crete. 

Presented by H. R. Hall, Esq. 

XV. A series of terracotta heads, plaques, rosettes, and 
other objects. 

Presented by M. Costis Lembessis. 

XVI. — 1. Two gold earrings in the form of a club. 

2. Gold pendant in the form of a clenched right hand. 

3. Gold pendant in the form of a bunch of grapes. 

4. Electrum pendant in the form of a ram's head. 

5. Ivory locket with design of a seated woman holding 
a child, on a gold background. 

6. Ivory cylinder with rings for suspension. Probably 
intended to hold an amulet. 

7. Three lead plaques inscribed with Greek letters. 



72 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

8. Bronze fibula of hinged type inlaid with light blue^ 
red, and brown enamel. First-second cent. A.D. 

9. Glass scarabaeoid intaglio : Herakles carrying club and 
lion's skin. 

10. Two amber pendants. 

11. Three beads of rock-crystal, carnelian, and agate 
respectively. 

12. Kantharos with twisted handles. Black glaze with 
a vine-spray and the inscription AIONYZOY painted on it. 

1-12 are from Olbia. 

Presented by M. Pierre Mavrogovdato, 

XVII. — 1 . Series of one hundred and three votive offerings, 
consisting chiefly of bronze statuettes of a rude type repre- 
senting men and women. Besides these there are bronze 
models of parts of the human body and implements, three 
bronze fibulae, and one statuette in iron. They belong to 
the pre-Roman period of art in Spain, and are probably at 
least as early as the sixth cent. B.C. One of the female 
figures has a head-dress corresponding to that of the bust 
from Elche {Monuments Plot, IV. (1897), pis. xiii. and xiv.). 
These objects were found on the site of an ancient sanctuary 
near Despenaperros in the Sierra Morena, Spain. 

2. Series of twenty-two photographs illustrating the 
above collections. 

Presented by Horace Sandars, Esq. 

XVIII. — 1. Series of eleven objects, including a mirror of 
stucco and glass, glass pendant, &ic., found at Gheyta and 
Tell el Yehudiyeh, Egypt. 

2. Wooden writing board with iron handle, inscribed with 
six lines from the Iliad (I. 468 flf.). 

Presented by the British School of Archoeology in Egypt. 

XIX. — 1. Three fragments of vases with rude human 
figures painted in dark brown on a light ground. 

2. Fragment of a vase inscribed in ink with a series of 
Greek letters. Apparently a reading exercise. 

3. Blue faience inkstand. 

4. Part of a male figure in blue faience. 

5. Two bronze bracteate figures of Dionysos and a pigmy 
respectively. 

6. Three objects in ivory, viz., a head of a barbarian in 
relief ; a plaque with a group of deities in relief, including 
Serapis and Isis ; and an elephant on a base, inscribed under- 
neath AIKYHTHN. 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 73 

7. Four objects in wood, viz., a writing tablet coated with 
wax, a rude figure of a horse, a seal holder (?), and a weaving 
instrument (?). 

8. Red jasper intaglio : Herakles struggling with the 
Hydra. 

9. Two reed pens. 

1-9 are from Behnesa {Oxyrhynchus). 

Presented by the Committee of the 
Egypt Exploration Fund, 

XX. Series of one hundred and five objects, consisting 
of specimens of " Minoan " pottery, fragments of wall-paint- 
ings, models of stone vases, and other antiquities found in 
the excavations at Knossos, Crete. 

Presented by Dr. Arthur Evans, p.r.s. 

XXI. Fragment of blue-glazed pottery with band of 
flowers in green. Found at Mitrahenny (the site of the 
ancient Memphis), with many fragments dating roughly from 
the first to the third cent. A.D. 

Presented by H. Wallis, Esq. 

XXII. — 1. Kylix with black-figure designs on a narrow 
bufi" band, representing a youth seizing one of five girls 
dancing before a burning altar in the presence of a seated 
man and a ploughing and sowing scene. 

2. Kylix with a black-figure design on a light band re- 
presenting Herakles (?) in combat with an Amazon in the 
presence of eight standing figures and two horsemen. The 
design is given twice, on each side of the vase. 

3. Kylix with a black-figure design of Hermes running 
on the inside of the bowl. 

4. Kylix with a rude palmette design in black, inscribed 
ArA0AZ. 

5. Red-figure lekythos. The design represents a nude 
youth bending over a laver. 

1-5 are probably from excavations in Rhodes. 

Presented by Sir Henry Howorth, k.c.i.e. 

XXIIT. Terracotta relief (a modern forgery), representing 
Odysseus and the Sirens. 

Presented by Mr. A. Decaristo. 

XXIV. A framed drawing showing a suggested restoration 
of the Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae. It is based largely 
on the restoration of the columns as set up in the Archaic 
Room. 

Brawn and presented by R. Phen^ Spiers, Esq. 

Cecil Smith. 



^7"4 ACCOUNTS, ETC.j OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of British and Medieval Antiquities ai^^i) 
Ethnography. 

1.— Arrangement. 

Prehistoric Section. — A new table-case has been supplied 
to contain a scale model of Stonehenge, with diagrams and 
explanatory label. A series of modern flints, pottery, &c. 
illustrating prehistoric methods has been exhibited in the 
lower part of Table-case H, and a prehistoric collection from 
Aberdeenshire in the corresponding part of Case K. Seven 
cases in Stone Age Gallery have been cleared for cleaning. 

Late-Keltic and Gaulish Sections. — The exhibition of the 
Morel Collection has been completed by the addition of the 
Merovingian series in Cases 61, 62 ; and two stumps of stakes 
from the Thames at Brentford have been mounted above 
Wall-cases .56-60. 

Romano-British Section. — The red Gallo-Roman ware 
found in Britain has been permanently labelled and exhibited 
in chronological order ; stamped fragments of the same 
arranged in alphabetical order in drawers ; arid a series of 
plain red-ware dredged from Pudding-pan Rock, Heme Bay, 
has been exhibited in Wall-case 97. The collections from 
caves in Yorkshire have been remounted, and a diagram of 
Arretine and Gallo-Roman pottery, as arranged by Dr. 
DragendorfF, affixed to the screen. 

Anglo-Saxon Room. — Part of the Gibbs Bequest has been 
re-mounted and re-arranged, and temporary labels provided 
for the series of Scottish and Irish brooches. 

Mediceval Room. — The permanent labelling of the Italian 
plaquettes has been commenced, and the Oct. Morgan collec- 
tion of watches permanently labelled. 

Glass and Gera'mic Room.. — The maiolica collection has 
been temporarily labelled and arranged in accordance with 
the slip catalogue, and the series of Egyptian and Greek glass 
mounted and furnished with type-written labels. 

Asiatic Saloon. — The Chinese porcelain has been cleaned 
and re-arranged as far as Case 70, and the majority of 
Chinese and Japanese bronzes labelled. 

Gallery of Religions. — Important collections from Tibet 
have been exhibited in Wall-cases 46-55 of the Buddhist 
Koom and the adjoining table-case. Permanently labelled 
plinths have been provided for Indian Buddhist carvings. 

Ethnographical Gallery. — The floors have been polished 
throughout and standard and table-cases shifted for the 
purpose. In the Oceanic section the London Missionary 
Society's collection has been re-arranged in Cases 141-3 ; the 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 75 

Cooke-Daniels collection from New Guinea exhibited in 
Case 25 : the New Zealand collection entirely re-arranged 
in Cases 132-40, and the series from Samoa and Savage 
Island re-arranged in Cases 130-1. The feather cloaks from 
Hawaii, deposited by H.M. the King, have been exhibited 
in a special standard-case, and collections from the Mar- 
quesas, Tahiti, Hervey Islands, and Easter Island re-arranged 
in Table-case 197. 

In the African section the collection from the Uganda 
Protectorate has been re-arranged and labelled, Kabyle 
pottery in Case U labelled, and a series of steatite figures 
from Mendiland exhibited in Table-case 182. 

In the American section a special exhibition from the 
Sloane collection has been arranged in Table-case 191 ; and 
collections from Brazil, Peru, Ecuador, and British Guiana 
re-arranged in Wall-cases 87-93. The South American col- 
lection has been re-arranged in Table-cases 188-9, and feather 
ornaments from Ecuador exhibited in drawers accessible to 
the public below Table-case 190. 

A'laerican Room. — The Mexican mosaics in standard 
Case G have been re-arranged and permanently labelled. 

Gold Ornament Room. — The re-mounting and labelling 
of finger rings have been completed. Permanent labels have 
been provided for the Persian and Sassanian silver dishes in 
the Franks Bequest. 

Registration.— The registration of current acquisitions 
has been continued, and 3,450 objects have been added, 
including ethnographical specimens. 

Catalogues. — The slip-catalogue of ornamented and 
stamped red ware of Gallo-Roman manufacture from Britain 
has been completed and prepared for the press. The slip- 
catalogues of Maiolica and Ivories have been completed, and 
the Guide to the Mediaeval Room prepared for the press. 
Progress has been made with the Guide to the Ethnographical 
Gallery ; and an anthropological " questionnaire " for 
Australia prepared, and printed for the Trustees. A slip- 
catalogue of the Chinese porcelain has been begun, and a 
heraldic ordinary prepared from the works of Ciaconius and 
Litta. 

Photographs to the number of 263 have been taken in the 
Department for purposes of illustration and reference ; 834 
type-written labels have been cut and bordered ; 110 mounting 
boards papered, and 990 specimens mounted. Blocks to the 
number of 159 have been covered with velvet for finger-rings, 
four stands stained and varnished, and a collection from the 
Congo Free State unpacked, labelled, and stored. Labels, 
blocks, frames, and plinths have been prepared to the number 
of 665, and various fittings prepared for the Prehistoric Room, 
Buddhist Room, and Ethnographical Gallery. 



76 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Registration numbers have been painted on 3,661 speci- 
mens, and 777 permanent labels written. Several plinths of 
Roman inscribed monuments have been cleaned and re- 
written ; and a number of old collections in the basement 
examined. 

Two thousand nine hundred and ninety-five students and 
visitors have been received in the Department. Two parties 
from John Lyon School at Harrow, and parties of University 
Extension students from Walworth and Battersea have been 
conducted through various sections of the Department by 
members of the Staff; and a lecture on social development as 
illustrated by English pottery delivered to members of the 
North London Students' Association. 

II. — A cquisitions. 
(1.) Prehistoric and Early British Antiquities : — 

(a.) Stone Age. — Two palaeolithic implements from a 
gravel-pit at Croxley, Herts, described in Proceedings of the 
Society of Antiquaries, vol. xxi., p. 32 ; given by Sir John 
Evans, k.c.b. 

A. series of palaeolithic implements from Knowle Farm 
Quarry, Savernake Forest, Wilts ; given by Rev. H. G. O. 
Kendall. 

A roughly shaped piece of quartz, perhaps an implement 
found by the donor on the surface at the base of Nine 
Maiden's tumulus, Cornwall ; given by Mrs. Clement Reid. 

Greenstone neolithic celt probably from N. England ; 
given by A. E. Douglas, Esq. 

Flint flakes and arrowhead found near Ai-bor Low, Derby- 
shire ; given by J. B. Titterton, Esq. 

A number of flint flakes from the Thames at Wandsworth, 

A patinated flint knife dredged from the Thames at 
Cookham, Berks ; given by R. E. Goolden, Esq., f.s.a. 

Flint arrowheads and flakes from the Mendips ; given by 
Wm. McPherson, Esq. 

A large series of flint arrowheads and stone implements 
from Aberdeenshire. 

(b ) Bronze Age. — Flat bronze celt dredged from the 
Thames at Hammersmith. 

Fragments of a sun-disc consisting of a bronze plate with 
gold facing, found in a grave under a round barrow on 
Lansdown Links, Bath, and described in the Proceedings of 
the Bath Natural History and Antiquarian Field Club, 
1906 ; given by Sir H. Waldemar Lawrence, Bt., and A. 
Waldemar Lawrence, Esq. 

A hoard of eight gold bracelets, total weight 24 ozs. 
8 dwt., found in a gravel-pit at Bexley, Kent ; purchased 
from H.M. Treasury as Treasure Trove. 



BRITISH AND MEDIAEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 77 

Pottery fragments and other objects from Rushall Down, 
Wilts ; given by Major Wm. Hawley, F.S.A. 

Bronze sickle from the Thames at Shepperton. 

Two embossed gold bands from RavenclifFe Cave, Derby- 
shire ; purchased from H.M. Treasury as Treasure Trove. 

(c.) Early Iron Age. — An ornamented bronze brooch of 
early La Tene type, found near Box, Wilts ; given by Alfred 
Jones, Esq. 

An engraved bronze scabbard with remains of iron dagger, 
and large fragments of pottery from the Thames between 
Putney and Hammersmith, 

Weaving-comb and other tools of bone, wooden trencher, 
iron sickle, knives, &c., from the Thames at Wandsworth. 

Iron sword from the Thames at Hammersmith, anvi lance- 
head from Mortlake. 

Two iron lance-heads and ferrule of spear from the Thames 
at Cookham, Berks ; given by R. E. Goolden, Esq., F.s.A. 

Series of antiquities, comprising objects of bronze, lead, 
pottery, shale, bone, and .horn ; given by the Glastonbury 
Antiquarian Society. 

Large vessel of thin bronze with perforation at the base 
and probably used for the same purpose as a water-clock ; 
found on the causeway of an earthwork called The Berth, 
near Baschurch, Salop, and given by R. Wall, Esq. 

Two stumps of stakes used for defending the ford at 
Brentford, where Gsesar probably crossed the Thames ; 
described in Archaeological Journal, Vol. LXIIL, p. 28, and 
given by Montagu Sharpe, Esq., J. P., D.L. 

Two spindle-whorls, from Lakenheath and Tuddenham, 
Suffolk ; given by C. R. Jennings, Esq. 

Faceted stone balls and series of spindle-whorls from 
Aberdeenshire. 

(d.) Foreign. — Deer-antler pick used in the neolithic 
flint-mines at Spienncs, Belgium ; given by Monsieur A. 
Louzeau de Lehaie. 

A series of flint implements of palaeolithic types from the 
High Gebel plateau, W. Thebaid ; collected and given by 
H. R. Hall, Esq. 

Four flints from the high plateau, Thebes ; given by 
C. H. Read, Esq., F.S.A, 

Saddle-back quern and rubber from Tell el-Yahudeyeh, 
near Cairo ; given by the British School of Archseology in 
Egypt. 

Stone chisel-edged celt from Allahabad ; given by John 
Lewis, Esq. 

Bronze sword from Jyderup, Veile, Jutland, 



78 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Pottery bowl and bead found inside it from Despeiia- 
perros, Sierra Morena, Spain : given by Horace Sandars, 
Esq., F.S.A. 

A series of small flint implements from river-gravels in 
the neighbourhood of Victoria Falls, Zambesi, described in 
Report of the British Association, 1905 ; given by the 
Exploration Committee through G. W. Lamplugh, Esq., 

F.K.S. 

Stone implements from various sites in Victoria and 
Tasmania ; given by E. S. Anthony, Esq. 

A series of stone implements found in Northern Tas- 
mania ; given by Rev. C. G. Wilkinson. 

Stone implements, one of exceptional length, found in and 
near gold-diggings at Kyebi, Eastern Akim, Gold Coast. 

(2.) Romano-British : — 
Fragments of inscribed stones and ivory carvings found 
with other remains on the site of a Roman villa in Greenwich 
Park, 1904 ; given by H.M. First Commissioner of Works. 

A series of cinerary urns, vase&, and dishes from burials 
at Seaford, Sussex, described and illustrated by the donor in 
Journal of Anthropological Institute, X., 134 ; given by 
F. G. Hilton Price, Esq., Dir. s.A. 

Part of a copper cake with MF incised, found at Conway, 
N. Wales. 

Bronze dish and enamelled pendant from Swaffham, 
Norfolk. 

Silver finger-ring with niccolo intaglio of 3rd century, 
ploughed up at Wittering, Northants, and ornamented pottery 
vase found near St. George's Church, South wark ; given by 
C. n. Read, Esq., F.S.A. 

Fragments of Gallo-Roman red-ware with potters' marks, 
from Somerset ; given by Wm. McPherson, Esq. 

Iron nails, cleats, and fragments from settlement on 
Rushall Down, Wilts ; given by Major Wm. Hawley, F.S.A. 

Bronze model shovel found at Cirencester ; given by 
Mrs. Cripps. 

Fragments of Gallo-Roman red-ware, some with potters' 
marks, found together at Carlisle ; given by A. Barnes Moss, 
Esq. 

(3.) Anglo-Saxon : — 

Bronze brooches, gilt pendants, pin, stylus, and ivory 
fragment from two graves at Leagrave, Beds, 1905, described 
and illustrated in Froc. Soc. Ant., XXL, 59, and given by 
Messrs. JuU Bros. 

Iron spear-head found at Watford, Herts; given by C. H. 
Read, Esq., F.S.A. 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 79 

JjanCe-head, key, and chain from Marstori, near Grantham, 
Lines. 

Iron sword-knife (scramasax), probably from the Thames; 
given by F. G. Hilton Price, Esq., Dir. s.a. 

Sword of the Viking period found with iron key below 
Farndon Church, near Newark, Nottsj 1892; given by Rev. 
A. L. Sparkes. 

Bronze ring-headed pin and penannular brooch, both found 
near Killucan, co. Westmeath, 1906, and described in Proc. 
Soc. Ant, XXL, 64, Q6 ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Iron sword with remains of wooden scabbard, of Teutonic 
type, found at Gheyta, Egypt, 1906, and given by the British 
School of Arch-aeology in Egypt. 

(4.) Mediceval and Later : — 

(a.) British. — Two pointed and oval seal-matrices with 
legends +AMA ME VERO AMO T£ and IE SV SEL 
D'AMVREL, late 13th century; and gilt signet ring with 
IB and crozier, from Newmarket, 16th century; given by 
C. H. Read, Esq., F.s.A. 

Pointed oval seal-matrix of Thos. Fynyon, Abbot of the 
Cistercian monastery of Combermere, Cheshire, 15th century, 
described in Proc. Soc. Ant., IX., 207 ; and another of the 
Archbishop of Canterbury's Commissary for Visitations, 
14th century. 

Six mortuary crosses of lead found on the site of the 
Grey Friars' monastery, Newgate Street, and described in 
Proc. Soc. Ant., XXL, 18 ; given by F. G. Hilton Price, Esq., 
Dir. S.A. 

Bronze gilt frame with pierced corners and engraving for 
a dial, 15th century. 

Wooden stam|3 for making tiles, about 1700; given by 
T. Charbonnier, Esq. 

Inlaid wooden inscription in black-letter, found below 
Holy Cross Church, Moreton Morrell, Warwickshire, and 
described in Proc. Soc. Ant., XL, 222 ; girdle-end with sacred 
monogram and bone pins from Salisbury ; and large pottery 
fragments with applied ornament from Christ's Hospital, 
Newgate Street, City of London, 16th century : all given by 
C. R. Baker King, Esq. 

Two sepulchral brasses : coat-of-arms and two shrouded 
figures, 16th century ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Copper plate engraved with coat-of-arms and legend, 
DAGLORIAM DEO HENRY TREVILLION DIER OF 
LONDON GAVE THIS AN DOMINO (sic) 1634; given 
by T. Whitcomb Green, Esq. 

Tinned brass spoon with fleur-de-lys stamped in the bowl, 
late 16th century ; given by H. J. Ellis, Esq. 



80 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Ivoiy sector with brass mounts, made by Spear of Dublin, 
18th century ; given by Max Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. 

Series of lamps, rush-holders and brackets, strike-a-lights 
and domestic appliances from Aberdeenshire. 

Mechanical bellows from Glastonbury, carding-comb from 
Buckf ast, Devon ; mill for straw-plaits, straw-splitters, bobbin 
for lace-making winder, flail and dibbers ; given by Mrs. Edge- 
Partington. 

A number of obsolete seal-matrices of silver and steel for 
British colonies and dependencies during the reign of Queen 
Victoria ; given by the Lord President of the Council. 

(b.) Foreign. — A remarkable medallion decorated in 
cloisonne enamel on both faces, with busts of St. George 
and St. Theodore in various colours : Byzantine work of the 
11th century, described and figured in Proc. Soc. Ant., XXI., 
195 ; given by Chas. J. Wertheimer, Esq. 

Silver-gilt plaque with translucent enamels of Cologne 
work, figures of St. Peter and a saint ; early 15th century. 

Bronze seal-matrices with legends, S' RIGHONE DE 
VALBONA and S' ROVLANT DE TIMBEQVE : 14th 
century; given by C. H. Eead, Esq., f.s.a. 

Circular bronze seal matrix of ADAM LE GRVT, Flemish, 
16th century ; given by Mr. A. P. Ready. 

Brass matrix of seal of John Campeggio, Bishop of 
Bologna, 1553-63, consecrated Bishop of Parenzo, 1537, the 
legend altered ; described in P7wc. Soc. Ant., IX., 208. 
Another of Marcus Fidelis Gonzaga, Bishop of Mantua, 
1578-1583. 

Copper plate with rivet, once enamelled, with arms of 
Philippa of Hainault with difference, found in Normandy ; 
given by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Copper-gilt plaque from a triptych, representing the 
Crucifixion ; French work of the 14th century. 

Italian bronze plaque of St. Peter, late 16th century, and 
oval plaque with bust, Dutch, about 1630 ; given by H. J. 
Ellis, Esq. 

Gilt handle of chamberlain's key, with cypher of the 
Empress Catharine and Peter I. of Russia ; given by M. P. 
Mavrogordato. 

Enamelled gold snuff-box, with onyx cameo, by Neuber of 
Dresden, and another with sardonyx cameo, by Gibert of 
J*aris ; given by Mrs. Hawkins. 

(5.) Ceramic and Glass Collections : — 
(a.) Oriental Wares. — Bowl of delicate ware covered with 
creamy glaze, with translucent guilloche ornament round 
the neck, and decoration in green and blue ; Persian, 13th 
century. 



BKITISH AND MEDIAEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 81 

. Pottery vase with turquoise glaze and line decoration in 
black ; Persian. 

A number of glazed fragments of Persian ware, decorated 
in various styles, 13th century. 

Porcelain cup-holder in the form of a male figure on blue 
leaf-base : Japanese, perhaps Kameyama ware ; given by 
J. Edge-Partington, Esq. 

'Chinese porcelain cup and saucer with shield of arms and 
motto, Persevere ; given by A. A. de Pass, Esq. 

(b.) Continental. — Maiolica albarello with male head in 
oval panel from the Carmichael Collection, and a pair of 
two-handled vases with coat-of-arms ; all with decoration of 
Spanish type. Italian, 15th century. 

Maiolica bowl of unusual size with wreaths of foliage and 
fruit ; Faenza ware, about 1 530. 

Maiolica plaque of Urbino ware, representing Sinon before 
Priam, painted by Fra Xanto, about 1540 ; an oval plaque of 
La Belle Jardiniere in Savona faience, signed by Agostino 
Ratti, 18th century; and a stove-tile with figure of St. Luke, 
German, 17th century ; all given by Sir Henry H. Howorth, 
K.C.I.E. 

Flat dish with deer and floral design in colours ; Spanish, 
16th century. 

Tin-glazed Toby jug found in Madrid ; given by Senor Don 
G. J. de Osma. 

(c.) English. — Large potteryjug, with brown glaze, found 
at Coventry, 14th century ; given by H. H. Mulliner, Esq. 

Large series'of glazed pavement tiles, 14th-16th century ; 
given by C. H. Eead, Esq., f.s.a. 

Pieces of pottery with applied decoration from the site 
of Christ's Hospital, Newgate Street, City of London, 16th 
century ; given by C. R. Baker King, Esq. 

Two Devonshire pavement tiles, one dated 1700 ; given by 
T. Charbonnier, Esq. 

Cup and saucer of Worcester porcelain with the Flirsten- 
berg mark ; given by A. Hurst, Esq. 

Basalt-ware teapot, with cupids and festoons, stamped 
Neale <& Co. ; given by C. R. Jennings, Esq. 

Delft plate with landscape in purple, stated to have been 
made by Chamberlayne, Great Killiane, co. Wexford ; given 
by Max Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A. 

(d.) Glass. — Glass jug and amphora with applied festoons 
in colours, from Ampurias, Gerona, N.E. Spain. 

White vase with two rows of applied claws, and olive- 
green moulded cup with Greek inscription: ET<f>PAINOT 
E4XJJTTAPE; both from the neighbourhood of Olbia, S. 
Russia. 

105. F 



82 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A remarkable series of beads, several with masks, of the 
Greek period, from the neighbourhood of Olbia, S. Russia. 

Two beads with masks from Saf t el Henna, Goshen, dating 
from the XXIII. dynasty, about 800 B.C. ; given by the British 
School of Archaeology in Egypt. 

Marbles and painted fragments of the Roman period from 
Oxyrhynchus ; given by the Egypt Exploration Fund. 

Portion of bottle of rare quality with gilt decoration, 
human figures and foliage, made for the Sultan of Egypt, 
1342-45 ; from Asia Minor, 14th centurj'-. 

Stamp from wine bottle with EM and three tuns, and 
eight wine bottles of the 18th century ; given by C. R. 
Jennings, Esq. 

(6.) Collection illustrating various Religions : — 

(a.) Buddhism. — An important series of temple-pictures 
and ceremonial objects collected during the Tibet expedition ; 
given by the Government of India. 

Series of temple-pictures from Tibet ; given by Lt.-Col. 
Waddell, c.b. 

Silk temple-picture, ceremonial vestments of bone worn 
by dancers, wooden horn, stool of Shigatse work, saddle- 
mounts, Buddhist figure, and mould for clay figures, collected 
by Capt. O'Connor in Tibet. 

Seven silk temple-pictures from Tibet. 

A pair of gilt wooden statuettes from Japan ; given by 
J. Edge-Partington, Esq. 

Brass dorje or sacred thunderbolt from Japan ; given by 
Mrs. Edge-Partington. 

(b.) Brakminism. — Yoni symbol supported by a tortoise ; 
given by Robert Day, Esq., f.s.a. 

(7.) Oriental and Ethnographical : — 

Asia. — An extensive and valuable series of weapons, 
ornaments, and musical instruments from the Semang and 
Sakai of the Malay Peninsula ; collected and given by Signor 
B. Cerruti. 

A series of models of reptiles made at Bangkok, Siam ; 
given by \V. H. Graham, Esq. 

A series of swords from the Philippines and Celebes ; 
given by Sir Victor Horsley, f.r.s. 

A steel mirror in brass mount from Travancore ; given 
by Percival Landon, Esq. 

Two folding candlesticks and a netsuke strike-a-light 
from Japan ; given by Charles Lund, Esq. 

A series of watercolour drawings of pottery figures from 
Japanese burial-mounds ; given by Neil Gordon Monro, Esq. 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 83 

A carved wooden ceremonial figure from Borneo ; given 
"by Dr. C. G. Seligmann. 

Gold filigree necklace and earrings, from Rangoon, 
Burma ; given by Mrs. Eustace Smith. 

A jade seal from the temple of the god of war, Pekin ; 
given by Clarke Thornhill, Esq. 

A malachite bead used as an amulet^ from Madras ; given 
by Mrs. Edward Thurlow. 

A Dyak medicine-man's basket, containing charms. 
A Sassanian silver bowl with medallions in low relief. 

Africa. — An important series of weapons and utensils 
from the pastoral and agricultural tribes on the Anglo- 
German boundary and from Kavirondo, Uganda Protectorate ; 
collected and given by Capt. T. T. Behrens. 

A collection of Masai and Ja-Luo spears and shields ; 
collected by the late C. M. Cowper-Coles, Esq., and given by 
S. H. Cowper-Coles, Esq. 

An interesting series of weapons and utensils from 
Barotse-land, including baskets of unusual perfection of 
workmanship ; collected and given by W. Eatherley, Esq. 

A collection of weapons, utensils, and musical instruments 
from Liberia ; given by Sir Harry H. Johnston, g.c.m.g., k.c.b. 

An interesting series of weapons and ceremonial objects 
from the Pagan tribes of the province of Bauchi, Northern 
Nigeria; collected and given by C. N. Temple, Esq. 

A quiver from the Ituri Forest, Congo Free State ; given 
by the Hon. W. Rothschild, M.P. 

An " Arab " woman's head ornament, and seven " Turkish " 
jam-spoons, from Algeria ; given by Mrs. Eustace Smith. 

A large and important series of steatite carvings from 
Mendi-land. These carvings are found buried in the earth, 
and their origin is unknown to the natives, who regard them 
with especial veneration as agricultural charms ; collected 
by Lieut. A. W. Eoddy. 

A series of pottery vessels, including the chief types in 
common use at Mombasa ; collected by A. C. Hollis, Esq. 

Two ancient glass beads from Accra, Gold Coast — one 
of spindle-whorl shape and of very remarkable size and type. 

A series of stone celts from the Gold Coast — one 2 ft. 4 m. 
long. 

A series of gold-weights and figures of cast brass from the 
Gold Coast. 

Two carved wooden cups from the Kasai district of the 
Congo Free State. 

Oceania. — A valuable and extensive series of ceremonial 
objects and utensils, many of a type hitherto unknown, 

F 2 



84 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

from British New Guinea ; collected by the Cooke-Daniels 
Ethnographical Expedition, and given by Major W. Cooke- 
Daniels. 

Specimens of clothing and utensils from Australia and 
British New Guinea ; given by Dr. C. G. Seligmann. 

A fringed skirt of woven flax of very unusual type, from 
New Zealand; given^by John Bush, Esq. 

A native canoe from the Wimmera River, N.W. Victoria ; 
given by Professor Gregory. 

A tiki neck^ornament in jade, of extremely unusual type,, 
being carved on both sides, from New Zealand (described in 
Man, 1906, 53). 

A series of ornaments and utensils from the Solomon 
Islands, including an interesting stone bowl from New 
Georgia; collected by C. M. Woodford, Esq. 

A collection of ornaments and utensils from the Caroline 
Islands ; collected by Mr. C. H Kent. 

A series of turtle-shell spoons and bowls from Pelew 
Islands. 

A series of wooden ceremonial figures from German New 
Guinea. 

A' head-rest of unusual type from Tonga. 

A elub of unusual size from the New Hebrides. 

America. — The mummy of a baby from Peru ; given by 
Belville Stanier, Esq. 

A wooden club ornamented with unusally fine carving ; 
from British Guiana. 

Three bands of old shell wampum, probably of Eastern 
Algonquian manufacture (described Journ. Anthr. Inst., 
Vol. XXXVI., p. 176). 

A large spoon made from the horn of the mountain sheep, 
and a model shield in copper, used as currency, from the 
North-west Coast. 

Christy Collection. 
During the year 796 objects have been entered in the 
Registration Catalogue. The Christy Trustees have acquired 
by donation the following objects, which they have trans- 
ferred to the Trustees of the British Museum : — 

I. — Prehistoric Antiquities of Europe, Asia, and 
Africa : — 
Donations. — A stone celt from the Malay Peninsula ; 
given by Leopold Cazalas, Esq. 

Two stone implements of palaeolithic type from Vrede-en- 
Lust Farm. Simondium, near Paarl, Ca,pe Town ; given by 
Charles Elliott, Esq. 



BKITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 85 

Five stone arrowheads from El Wad, Algerian Sahara; 
given by Melville W. Hilton-Simpson, Esq. 

A series of stone implements of palaeolithic type from 
Vrede-en-Lust Farm, Simondium, near Paarl, Cape Town ; 
given by 0. H. Read, Esq. 

Casts of two iron implements and a spear-head found at 
Klang, Selangor, and of an implement found in a mine at 
Bengkong, Batang Padang, Perak, Federated Malay States ; 
given by L. Wray, Esq. 

TI. — Ethnography of Asia : — 

Donations. — A working model of a loom from Patani, 
Lower Siamese States ; given by Henry Balfour, Esq. 

Pottery pipes from Nyoung-we, S. Shan States; given 
by Lennox Bartlett, Esq. 

A series of ten carved ivory spheres, one within the 
other, from China ; given by Charles Lund, Esq. 
- ' A carved powder-flask from the Battaks of Sumatra ; 
given by C. H. Read, Esq. 

A Chinese lacquered pillow of the 17th century ; given by 
Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

A bow and quiver, with arrows from Pageh ; given by 
Edwin T. Sachs, Esq. 

III. — Ethnography of Africa: — 

Donations. — An " Aggri " bead, from the Putu country, 
Liberia ; given by I. F. Braham, Esq. 

Two pottery drums from Morocco and one from Egypt ; 
given by A. W. F. Fuller, Esq. 

Five copper coins from El Wad, Algerian Sahara, and a 
rat-trap used by the Mekhadma tribe, near Wargla, French 
Sahara ; given by Melville W. Hilton-Simpson, Esq, 

A pottery pipe, Ba-Toka; given by E. Primmer, Esq. 

A silver ear-ornament from Nubia ; given by C. H. Read, 
Esq. 

A N'Konde shield from S.E. Africa ; given by Dr. F. V. 
Stoehr. 

IV. — Ethnography of Oceania and Australia : — 

Donations. — A stone axe found at a soakage, 60 miles E. 
of Mannum, S. Australia ; given by G. Brunskill, Esq. 

Two leaf baskets from the Solomon Islands and three 
from New Guinea; given by A. W. F. Fuller, Esq. 

A series of ornaments and a coral throwing-club, from 
the New Hebrides ; given by Dr. Messer. 



86 iVCCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A number of ear-ornaments from the Banks Islands, and 
an emu-feather girdle fi-om an early native settlement on the- 
site of the present city of Melbourne ; given by Bishop 
Montgomery. 

A club from the Marquesas, a spear from Fiji, a fragment of 
jade, showing the method employed by the Maori for cutting, 
from New Zealand, and a series of stone implements from 
Rushworth, Victoria, Australia ; given by C. H. Read, Esq. 

A ceremonial torch from Torres Island ; given by Rev, 
L. P. Robins. 

A number of small cubical stones from the N.E. border 
of S. Australia, called by the natives " devil's dice " ; given 
by Ross Smith, Esq. 

Four carved ceremonial boards from British New Guinea ; 
given by Dr. W. M. Strong. 

V. — Antiquities and Ethnography of America : — 

Donations. — A bamboo case containing Urali poison, 
from Peru; given by Mrs. Edward E. Benest. 

A pottery vase from Homolobi, near Winslow, Arizona ; 
given by W. Crewdson, Esq. 

A series of stone implements and fragments of painted 
pottery, from Taltal, Atacama, Chile ; given by Oswald 
H. Evans, Esq (described in Man, 1907, 41). 

Four flint arrow-heads from Las Vegas, New Mexico ; 
given by C. B. Hodgson, Esq. 

An unusually fine specimen of carved wooden club armed 
with a large stone celt, from British Guiana ; given by 
C. H. Read, Esq. 

Charles H. Read. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 87 

Department of Coins and Medals. 

I. — Exhibitions. 
The naval medals shown in the King's Library in 
connection with the Nelson Centenary Exhibition have been 
replaced in the cabinets in the Medal Room. 

IT. — Registration and Arrangement. 
■ 1. Greek Series : — 

321 coins, recently acquired, and 12 coins from the 
Parkes Weber collection have been registered and incor- 
porated ; 1,245 tickets giving references to the Catalogue 
Parthia have been written and placed beneath the coins. 
Three series of Phoenician coins have been examined, and 
selections have been made for the Museum. The MS. 
catalogue of a large collection of Phoenician coins, formed at 
Beyrout, has been examined. Additions have been made to 
the MS. bibliography of Greek numismatics. 

Rectifications and re-arrangements, in accordance with 
recent literature, have been made in the following series : — 
Terina ; Characene ; Persis ; Elymais (Susiana); coins of 
Athenian and Macedonian types of Indian provenance. The 
Phoenician series in the Berlin Museum and other collections 
have been examined and noted in preparation for the 
Catalogue Phoenicia. 

2. Roiinan and Byzantine Series : — 

137 Roman and Byzantine coins recently acquired have 
been registered and incorporated. 58 Byzantine coins 
from the Parkes Weber collection have been registered and 
incorporated. 

A hoard of Roman silver coins of the 4th century A.D., 
discovered at Grovely Wood, Wilton, Salisbury, has been 
examined and a selection from it made. A small hoard of 
early Roman Imperial denarii found near Scott Lane, 
Sheffield, has been examined and reported on to H.M. 
Treasury. 

A collection of Byzantine coins sent from Germany has 
been examined, and a selection has been made. 

3. British and Colonial Series : — 

248 coins and medals have been registered and 
incorporated. The Anglo-Gallic series has been partially 
re-arranged. The English medals struck betwee 1831-1837 
have been re-arranged and placed in new cabinets, and the 
medals of Societies have been transferred to a separate 
cabinet. 

4. Mediceval and Modern Series : — 

470 coins and medals recently acquired have been regis- 
tered and incorporated. 

99 coins from the Parkes Weber collection have been 
registered and 82 incorporated. 



'88 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

2-37 Portuguese coins from the Freudenthal collection 
have been incorporated. 

The Renaissance portrait-medals of French, Flemish, and 
Dutch origin have been separated from the general series of 
Personal medals and arranged in a new cabinet. The French 
medals have been arranged in order of artists' names, and 
progress has been made with the hand-list of medals of the 
16th and I7th centuries. 

A collection of the coins of the Princes of Achaia has been 
examined and a selection made. 

The collection of Dr. F. Parkes Weber (see infra under 
"IV. Acquisitions") has been examined, and 5,-551 pieces 
selected from it as desirable for the Museum have been 
presented by Dr. Weber. 

A MS. index has been begun of the principal coin- 
inscriptions recorded in the Traite de Numismatique of 
Engel and Serrure. 

5. Oriental Series : — 

302 coins recently acquired have been registered and 
incorporated. 

1,122 coins from the Cunningham collection and 299 from 
the Bank of England Collection have been registered and 
incorporated. 

Three series of coins from Persia have been examined and 
selections made. 

The series of the Moghul Emperors of Delhi has been 
expanded. 

New descriptive labels and heading-cards have been 
written for a portion of the Oriental collection, and an index 
to the 64 cabinets containing the collection (exclusive of the 
Far East series) has been prepared. 

III. — Catalogues. 

1. Catalogues of Greek Coins. 
Coins of Phrygia, by Barclay V. Head. 

This volume has been completed and published. 

Coins of Phoenicia, by G. F. Hilh 

The coins of Berytus, Carne, and Marathus have been 
weighed, arranged, and described, and portions of the 
Introduction have been written. 

2. Catalogues of Roman Coins. 
Roman Republican Coins, by H. A. Grueber. 
Signatures Z — 30 have been passed for press, and 

Plates XXXVI. -LIV. have been photographed. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 



89 



Im2oerial Byzantine Coinage, by Warwick Wroth. 

The coins of Basil II. (a.d. 976) and his successors to 
A.D. 1453 have been classified, weighed, and described. The 
MS. has been revised with the coins from Anastasius I. to 
Heraclius. Plaster-casts for Plates I.-XL. have been prepared 
and mounted, and Plates I.-XI. have been sent to press. 

3. Catalogues of British Coins and Medals. 

• Medallic Illustrations of the History of Great Britain 
and Ireland, by Hawkins, Franks, and Grueber. (Atlas of 
plates with letterpress.) 

Part V. comprising Plates XLI.-L. has been prepared and 
published. Progress has been made with the preparation of 
Part VI. 

4. Catalogues of Oriental Coins. 

Indian Coins. — Andhras and Western Kshatrai^as, hy 
E. J. Rapson. 

Signatures E, F, G have been passed for final press, and 
23 blocks reproducing coin legends have been prepared. 



IV. — Acquisitions. 

The total number of coins and medals added to the 
Department during the year 1906 was 7,074, of which 211 are 
of gold, 2,115 of silver, 3,552 of bronze, and 1,196 of other 
metals. 

The following table shows the numbers of the new acqui- 
sitions classified according to the several series to which they 
belong : — 



Class. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Bronze. 


Other 

Metals, 
&c. 


Total. 


Greek .... 
Roman --..-- 

British and Colonial 

Mediaeval and Modern 

Oriental ... - 


18 

25 

2 

42 

124 


241 
29 
199 
961 
685 


368 
168 
769 
2,054 
193 


15 

81 

265 

770 

65 


642 

303 

1,235 

3,827 

1,067 


Total - 


211 


2,115 


3,552 


1,196 


7,074 



Of the above, 5,953 have been presented, viz., 108 of gold, 
1,450 of silver, 3,203 of bronze, and 1,192 of other metals. 
This very large number of presentations is due mainly to 
the munificent gift of Frederick Parkes Weber, Esq., m.d. 
(See below, page 96.) 



90 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The following is a list of the benefactors to the Depart- 
ment of Coins during the past year : — ■ 

H.R.H. The Prince of Wales ; the Bombay Branch of the 
Royal Asiatic Society ; the Government of Bengal, India ; 
the Government of Bombay ; the Government of the Central 
Provinces, India ; the Government of the United Provinces 
of Agra and Gudh ; the Government of Eastern Bengal and 
Assam ; the Government of the Panjab ; the Council of the 
Linnean Society ; the Montreal Numismatic Society ; the 
New York Jewish Anniversary Celebration Committee ; the 
Society of Antiquaries of Scotland ; the Director of Customs, 
Shanghai ; the Trustees of the Wallace Collection ; J. S. 
Agnew, Esq. ; Rupert C. Alabaster, Esq. ; H. F. Amedroz, 
Esq. ; Dr. W. C. R. Barnes ; Prof. Julius Beltowski ; William 
Bird, Esq. ; the Rev. J. Harvey Bloom : Lady Bolton ; the 
late W. C. Boyd, Esq. ; C. S. Browne, Esq. ; Sig. A. Canta- 
cuzino; William Carruthers, Esq., f.r.s. ; J. S. Cotton, Esq. ; 
W. B. Denny, Esq. ; the Rev. Arthur Dixon ; Mrs. H. M. 
Eliott ; R. W. Ellis, Esq. ; Sir John Evans, K.C.B., f.r.s. ; 
L. Forrer, Esq. ; Evelyn Grant DufF, Esq. ; Major Stuart 
H. Godfrey ; Odon Gohl, Esq. ; Lord Grantley, F.S.A. ; Henry 
Grogan, Esq. ; F. W. Hasluck, Esq. ; Miss Alice Head ; the 
Rev. A. C. Headlam, d.d. ; G. F. Hill, Esq.; Sir Henry 
H. Howorth, k.c.i.e., f.r.s. ; R. A. Inglis, Esq. ; Mrs. JefFcock ; 
H. Neville S. Langton, Esq. ; A. J. Lawson, Esq. ; J. Bruce 
Leask, Esq. ; Miss H. L. Lorimer ; Angus Maclntyre, Esq. ; 
M. Pierre Mavrogordato ; J. R. McClean, Esq. ; M. Julius 
Meili ; Prof. C. Oman ; A. H. Parker, Esq. ; Sir Augustus 
Prevost, Bart. ; H. L. Rabino, Esq. ; H. A. Ramsden, Esq. ; 
C. T. Reed, Esq. ; J. T. T. Reed, Esq. ; Max Rosenheim, Esq., 
F.S.A. ; H. Sandars, Esq., F.s.A. ; Lieut.-Col. J. G. Sandeman, 
M.v.o. ; W. W. Simpson, Esq.; Messrs. Spink and Son; 
Beville Stanier, Esq. ; Alan J. B. Wace, Esq.; H. B. Walters, 
Esq. ; R. E. Way, Esq. ; Frederick Parkes Weber, Esq., M.D., 
F.S.A. ; W. H. Whittingham, Esq. ; J. W. Willis-Bund, Esq., 
F.S.A. ; W. Wroth, Esq. ; Col. the Hon. C. E. Yate. 

Remarkable Coins and Medals. 

Among the coins and medals which have been added to 
the National Collection during the year 1906, the following 
are the more important : — 

1. Greek Series : — 

(a.) Europe: — 

Sicily. — A silver coin (wt. 18 grains) of the 5th cent. B.C. 
with the obverse type, astragalus and legend KA and with 
the reverse type, dolphin and legend FIM- This extremely 
rare coin is attributed by Garrucci (Monn. Ital. Ant.^^. 154) 
to a joint-issue between the cities of Casarium in Bruttium 
and Himera in Sicily. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 91 

A drachm of Messana, circ. B.C. 480, of the usual type : 
obv. Charioteer and biga of mules ; rev. Running hare, MEZZ 
EN ION ; but without the usual figure of Nike on the 
obverse. 

Thrace. — A silver stater of Maroneia, circ. B.C. 400, of the 
Persic standard : obv. Prancing horse ; rev. Vine-branch with 
grapes. Under the horse is an adjunct symbol, a small dog 
of the breed commonly known as " Pomeranian " : magistrate's 
name, €ni KAAAIKPATEOZ- 

Thracian Chersonese. — Two bronze coins of Gallienus 
struck at Coela with types of reverse, the wolf and twins, 
and Aeneas with Anchises and Ascanius and the legend AEL. 
MVNICIP. COEL- (Aelium Municipium Coela). 

Thessaly. — An archaic half-drachm of the Perrhaebi of 
the 5th cent. B.C. : obv. A Thessalian horseman with a stele 
beneath his horse ; rev. Thetis seated holding a crested 
helmet ; legend fl E PA (retrograde). 

Insulae Thessaliae. — An ancient plated tetradrachm of 
Peparethus of the early 5th cent. B.C. of the Euboic stan- 
dard : obv. Large bunch of grapes with the letters TTE 
(Peparethus) ; rev. Bearded Dionysos enthroned, holding 
kantharos and thyrsos, within an incuse square ; another, not 
plated, with types ; obv. Large bunch of grapes surrounded by 
four dolphins swimming ; rev. Youth riding on a dolphin, 
within an incuse square ; and a bronze coin with types ; 
obv. Head of bearded Dionysos crowned with ivy ; rev. Kanth- 
aros with sprays of ivy and vine around it ; legend TTE 
(Peparethus). The silver coins are unique and unpublished. 
These three interesting coins were recently discovered at 
Volo, the ancient Demeti'ias, on the mainland of Thessaly, 
and at Skopelos, the ancient Peparethus, an island off" the 
coast of Thessaly to the north of Euboea. The silver pieces 
are of the highest importance for determining the locality 
of a considerable series of coins of similar types and fabric, 
which had been conjecturallj^ attributed to Cyrene and to 
other localities. The types relate to the cult of Dionysos in 
the island of Peparethus, very famous for its vines in ancient 
and modern times. It has been suggested that the bunch of 
grapes may also be regarded as a " canting device," containing 
an allusion to the name of the traditional colonist and founder 
" Staphylos." 

Epirus. — Two silver drachms of Epirus, circ. B.C. 250. 
Presented by Sir Henry H. Howorth, k.c.i.e., f.r.s. 

Acarnania. — A didrachm of Leucas of the 2nd cent, b o. : 
obv. Statue of Aphrodite AIvhclq ; rev. Prow of racing galley, 
inscribed on the side with its name. 

At Leucas as well as at Corcyra it appears to have been 
the custom to inscribe their names on the racing boats 
(see Hist. Num. p. 277). 



92 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Euhoea. — Two rare staters of Aeginetic weight dating- 
from about the end of the 5th cent. B.C. : ohv. A recumbent 
ox ; rev. The head of the njmph, Euboea. 

Attica. — Two tetradrachms of Athens oi the 5th cent. B.C., 
with head of Athene and owl ; found at Naukratis in Egypt. 
Presented hy Hi Neville. S. Langton, Esq. 

Corinth. — Three silver Corinthian colonial coins, and five 
silver coins of Dyrrhachium. 

Presented hy Sir Henry H. Howorth, k.c.i.e., f.r.s. 

A bronze coin of Septimius Severus, circ.'A.J). 200, with the 
type of reverse, the hero Lycurgus attacking a dragon, which 
devours his son Opheltes— a type probably copied from a 
mural painting or relief. 

Achaia. — A bronze coin of Septimius Severus struck at 
Bura with the type of reverse, a half -nude figure of Aphro- 
dite seated on a throne and holding a sceptre terminating in 
a golden apple. This is probably a copy of the statue by 
Eukleides mentioned by Pausanias (vii., 25, 5). 

Argos. — A bronze coin of M. Aurelius with the type of 
reverse, the hero Lycurgus attacking a serpent erect on the 
body of the dead Opheltes ; near which stands his nurse, 
Hypsipyle (Pausanias, ii., 15, 2). 

Scyros (?\ — A copper coin with obv. Youthful male head ; 
rev. Crayfish: symbol, buccinum shell. This coin belongs 
apparently to an unidentified mint : possibly Scyros, a town 
in the island of that name in the Aegean Sea, and one of the 
Northern Sporades, so called from its ruggedness. 

(6.) Asia : — 

Mysia. — Three copper coins of Attaea, Gyzicus, and 
Parium. Presented by F. W. Hasluck, Esq. 

A medallion in bronze of Caracalla struck at Cyzious 
with the reverse type, the Emperor standing before Sarapis, 
who is seated. 

Caria. — An unpublished didrachm of Gnidus, circ. B.C. 
400-390; obv. Head of Aphrodite; rev. Lion's head in an 
incuse square. 

Lydia. — A bronze coin of Julia Maesa, grandmother of 
Elagabalus, struck at Philadelphia with the type of reverse, 
the statue of the Praxitelean Hermes of Olympia. This type 
occurs on coins of Caracalla, but hitherto was unknown on 
those of Julia Maesa. 

A unique and very remarkable half-stater, probably 
Lydian, dating from the 7th cent. B.C. : obv. Bearded head or 
bust of a divinity apparently winged ; rev. Three incuse 
sinkings (oblong between two squares). The style and fabric 
of this coin resemble very closely some of those recently 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 93 

discovered during the excavations at Ephesus, which were 
carried out by the order of the Trustees of the British 
Museum. 

Cyprus. — -A tetrobol of Salamis of King Nikodamos, 
circ. B.C. 460-450: ohv. Recumbent ram.: rev. The Ankh ; 
and the name of the king and of the city in Cypriote 
characters. 

Phoenicia and Palestine. — A series of fifty-eight silver 
and eighty-nine bronze coins comprising : — Aradus, two early 
staters, circ. B.C. 400-350, with head of Melkarth and galley ; 
also a series of drachms of the 2nd cent. B.C. with Ephesian 
types, proving the existence of a monetary alliance between 
that city and Ephesus : Sidon. A double stater of Straton 
II., B.C. 346-832, with Artaxerxes III. (Ochus) in a chariot ; 
and another with the name of the Satrap Mazaios : Tyre. A 
stater, circ. B.C. 450-332, with Melkarth seated on a sea-horse 
and owl with crook and flail ; also a series of tetradrachms 
with head of Herakles and an eagle on prow, with various 
dates from B.C. 124-12 ; and Jerusalem, drachms of the 
Second Revolt, a.d. 132-135, bearing the name of Simon 
Barcochab, &c. 

Persia. — A counter-marked siglos of the Achaemenid 
dynasty. Presented by W. W. Sitnpson, Esq. 

2. Roman and Byzantine Series : — 

An unpublished copper denarius of Carausius : ohv. Bust 
of Emperor, radiate; rev. Seated figure of Roma; legend,. 
ROMAC (sic) AVG. 

Presented by the late W. 0. Boyd, Esq. 

An unpublished solidus with the heads of Heraclius and 
Heraclius Constantine, a.d. 641 ; probably struck in Italy. 

A very rare solidus of Leo VI., A.D. 886-917 : ohv. Bearded 
bust of the Emperor ; rev. Bust facing of the Virgin Mary. 

A solidus of the Byzantine Emperors, Nicephorus II. and 
Basil II., A.D. 963, with their busts on the obverse and Christ 
holding the book of the gospels on the reverse. A very rare 
coin. 

A solidus of Theodora, sister of Zoe, wife of the Byzantine 
Emperor, Constantine IX., a.d. 105.5-1056. A rare coin, and 
interesting for the details of her rich costume. 

3. British and Colonial Series : — 

A penny of Henry I. struck at Romney in Kent, having 
on the obverse the bust of the king holding a sceptre and on 
the reverse the moneyer's name and that of the mint,. 
PVLFRED ON RVME, arranged in two concentric circles 
with a cross pattee in the centre. This coin, besides being of 
the rarest type of Henry I., establishes the fact that the mint 
of Romney was in operation during his reign. 

A penny of Henry I. struck at Gloucester and having for 
the reverse type five annulets arranged in the form of a cross 
and the moneyer's name " Godwi." 



94 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

A naval reward medal in silver of Elizabeth commemorating 
the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and having on the reverse 
a representation of the ark on waves. This medal is of the 
18th cent, and is a copy by the engraver Stuart from original 
medals. It is described in the Medallic Illustrations, Vol. I., 
p. 149, no. 121. 

The " Descente en Angleterre " medal in lead ordered by 
Napoleon I. to be executed when he was making preparations 
for an invasion of England in 1804. On the obverse is the 
head of Napoleoh ; and on the reverse Hercules over- 
throwing a marine giant with the legend DESCENTE EN 

ANGLETERRE-FRAPPEE A LONDRES EN 1804. This 
medal was struck from unfinished dies made by JeufFroy and 
Denon, and is probably unique. It formerly belonged to 
Dr. Burney, by whom it was sold in 1846 to Mr. Charles 
Stokes, whose collection was recently dispersed. The existence 
of this medal was known to the Museum, but it had been lost 
sight of since the middle of the last century. 

A proof in bronze of the Lloyd's medal for " Saving Life 
at Sea," 1889. Presented by Miss Alice Head. 

A prize medal in bronze of the Moffat Academy Club, 
1860; and another in pewter of Peter Johnstone of Harthope, 
1865. Presented by William Carruthers, Esq., f.r.s. 

The Worcestershire County Council Medal for " Unbroken 
School Attendance " in bronze. 

Presented by J. W. Willis-Bund, Esq., f.s.a. 

The prize medal in silver of the Linnean Society. 

Presented by the Council of the Linnean Society. 

4. Mediaeval and. Modern Series : — 
A bronze medal of Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan, 
A.D. 1450-1466, by Ambrogio Foppa, called " II Caradosso." 
On the obverse is the bust of the Duke, and on the reverse 
the Duke receiving prisoners with the legend CLEMENTIA 
ET ARMIS PARTA. 

Presented by Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 

Six silver and four base metal deniers of Arezzo, Bologna, 
Genoa, Naples, Perugia, and Ravenna. 

Presented by Lady Bolton. 

A series of mediaeval and modern Spanish coins, com- 
prising 209 specimens in silver and 184 in copper. Besides 
many coins of the l7th and 18th centuries, this selection 
included a large number of deniers and gros of Castille and 
Leon — Alphonso VL, A.D. 1072-1100; Ferdinand IIL. 
A.D 1230-1252 ; of Castille alone — Sancho II., A.D. 1284- 
1295 ; Peter I. (El Cruel), A.D. 1350-1.368 ; Henry III., 
A.D. 1390-1406; and of Ferdinand and Isabella, ad. 1504- 
1516. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 95 

Ten silver, four copper, and eleven pewter coins of Goa 
and the Portuguese colonies. 

Presented by Henry Grog an, Esq. 

Three silver and one copper medal of the Paris Exhibition 
of 1900; one silver and one copper medal of the Mint at 
Paris, 1900; and a silver medal with heads of St. Peter and 
St. Paul by the German medallist Bastian Hille, A.D. 1666- 
1726. Presented by J. R. McCiean, Esq. 

A specimen in silver of the medal presented in 1841 by 
the President of the United States, John Tyler, to the 
American Indian Chiefs, having on the obverse the head of 
the President, and on the reverse two hands clasped ; above, 
a pipe and a tomahawk crossed. 

5. Oriental Series : — 

The " Prince of Wales Medal " for the decoration of 
deserving native officials during the recent visit to India 
of their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales. 
Bronze. Presented by H.R.H. the Prince of Wales. 

A series of 96 gold and 331 silver coins of various Arab 
dynasties. This selection, which formed a portion of the 
collection of the late Mr. J. M. C Johnston, extends over a 
wide range of Arab numismatics and includes many rare 
coins of the Benee Abbad and the Benee Hood of Seville and 
Saragossa ; the Benee Idrees and Aghlabids of Africa ; the 
Benee Tooloon of Egypt ; the El Murabiteen of Tunis ; the 
Sheybanee of Transoxiana and the Khans of Khokand. The 
larger dynasties, such as those of the Abbasee Khaleefehs, 
the Fatimee Khaleefehs, and the Mongols of Persia are 
represented by numerous specimens. 

A series of forty-five silver and three nickel coins of the 
Amawee and Abbasee dynasties, of the Mongols of Persia 
and of the later rulers, and of Delhi ; also a copper Sassanian 
coin and four Parthian drachms of Mithradates III. 

Presented by Evelyn Grant Duff, Esq. 

Three rupees of the Moghul Emperors of Delhi, Aurangzib 
'Alamgir, Shah-'Alam Bahadur, and Farrukh-Siyar, found in 
the Larkhana district, Sind. 

Presented by the Bombay Branch of the 

Royal Asiatic Society. 

Two mohurs of the Moghul Emperors of Delhi, 'Alamgir II. 
and Shah-'Alam II., found in the Poona district. 

Presented by the Bombay Branch of the 

Royal Asiatic Society. 

Four silver coins of the Moghul Emperors of Delhi, 
Shah-Jahan, Aurangzib 'Alamgir, Farrukh-Siyar, and Mu- 
hammad Shah. 

Presented by the Bombay Branch of the 

Royal Asiatic Society. 



96 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Seven rupees of the Moghul Emperors of Delhi, Ahmad 
Shah and 'Alamgir II., struck at Jahangirnagar, Murshi- 
dabad, &c. Presented hy the Bengal Asiatic Society. 

Thirty-two rupees of the Moghul Emperors of Delhi, 
Akbar, Shah-Jahan, Aurangzib 'Alamgir, Bahadur Shah, Mu- 
hammad, Shah 'Alam, and Muhammad II. ; and thirteen copper 
coins of Akbar, Shah 'Alam II., Akbar II., &;c. Also two 
Indo-Scythic tetradrachms of the '•' Great King." 

Presented hy R. W. Ellis, Esq. 

A Parthian drachm and twenty-two silver and two 
copper Persian coins, mostly of the Kajar dynasty. 

Presented by H. L. Rabino, Esq. 

Four silver coins, drachms, of Sinatruces of Parthia 
(B.C. 77-70) and three silver modern Persian coins. 

Presented by Evelyn Grant Duff, Esq. 

Three silver coins of Malwa found in the Hoshangabad 
district and two others of the Moghul Emperors, Ahmad 
Shdh, found in the Chindwara district. 

Presented hy the Government of the Central 

Provinces, India. 

A gold pagoda of Bijapur struck before the Muhammadan 
rule. 

Presented hy the Government of Bombay and Assam. 

Four silver coins of Kabul (Samanta Deva) and two 
others also of Kabul (Spalapati Deva). 

Presented by the Government of the Panjab, India. 

Two silver Ahom coins of Siva Simha, A.D. 1714-1744. 
Presented by the Government of Eastern Bengal 

and Assam. 

Eight silver coins of Assam of Pramatta Simha Gauri- 
Natha, and Laksmi-Simha. 

Presented by the Government of Eastern Bengal 

and Assam. 

Twenty-four silver and plated Chinese provincial and 
other coins. Presented by Dr. W. G. R. Barnes. 

The Parkes Weber Collection. 

Dr. Frederick Parkes Weber, who had formed an extensive 
collection of coins and medals, generously placed it at the 
disposal of the Trustees with a view to selecting such 
specimens as might be required foi- the British Museum. 
The collection consisted of Ancient Greek and Eoman coins, 
and of Mediaeval and Modern, British and Colonial and 
Oriental coins and medals. Amongst the Greek coins selected 
are several British and Gaulish gold staters and half-staters, 



DEPAKTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 



97 



and other staters of Philip II. of Macedon and Alexander the 
Great, together with some rare silver coins of Metapontum, 
Croton, Paeonia, Macedonia, Crete, &c. ; and in the Roman 
series some early interesting bronze pieces of the Republic, 
silver and bronze coins of the Empire, and Byzantine solidi 
and siliquae, &c. As the collection was very strong in the 
Mediaeval and Modern series the selection from these portions 
was very large, numbering 4,520 specimens. Amongst the 
mediaeval medals are two fine leaden proofs by Pisanello of 
Piero Candido Decembrio (a.d.'1399-1477), President of the 
Republic of Milan, and of Vittorino da Feltre (a.d. 1379-1447), 
distinguished orator, philosopher, and mathematician. There 
is also a unique lead medal, probably by a German engraver, 
of Theophrastus Paracelsus (a.d. 1493-1541), the eminent Swiss 
physician, who in the course of his journeys appears to have 
visited France, Spain, England, and other European countries. 
The modern medals are represented by the works of David 
D' Angers (of which hitherto the British Museum had possessed 
none), of Roty and ScharfF among others. The selection of 
British and Colonial coins and medals is of great value, filling 
many gaps in the Colonial series and adding very largely to 
that of the modern personal and historical medals. In illus- 
tration of primitive forms of currency the donation includes a 
number of specimens of bar and ring-money, such as the silver 
bars used in mediaeval Russia and bronze rings from Africa ; of 
the curiously-shaped coins from various countries of the East, 
such as the hat pieces of Pahang, the boat-money and tikals 
of Siam, and the fish-hooks of the Persian Gulf. Dr. Parkes 
Weber made a speciality of collecting tokens and other curious 
pieces, badges, tickets, counters, Szc, bearing indirectly on 
the study of numismatics, and also of pieces showing the 
technique and materials of coinage and medallic work such 
as dies, wax-models, trial-pieces, patterns, and specimens 
submitted in public competitions for the designs of coins. 
From these a large selection was made, and also of specimens 
representing the methods of forgery and adulteration. 

The following table gives a view of the number of coins 
and medals selected for the Museum : — 



Class. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Bro-nze 
and 
Brass. 


Lead, 

&c. 


Total. 


Greek 

Koman .... 

Mediaeval and Modern 

British and Colonial - 

Oriental - - ... 


17 
21 
42 

25 


122 
26 
7U 
168 
175 


206 
147 
1,845 
740 
145 


14 

81 

756 

255 

52 


359 

275 

3,357 

1,163 

397 


Totals - 


105 


1,205 


2,083 


1,158 


5,551 



Grand Total, 5,551 pieces. 
105. Q 



98 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

This donation of coins and medals is one of the most 
important received in the Department of Coins and Medals^ 
and will go far to render more complete many series, especially 
that of the modern medals. 

V. — Students and Visitors. 

The number of visits made to the Department of Coins and 
Medals by students and others during the year 1906 was 
4,365. 

H. A. Grueber, 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 99 

X. — British Museum (Natural History). 



STATEMENT of Progress made in the Arrangement and 
Description of the Collections, and Account of 
Objects added to them, in the Year 1906. 

General Progress. 

Visitors. 

The total number of visits recorded as having been made 
to the Museum by the public during the year 1906 was 
472,557, as compared with 566,318 in 1905. This number 
included 61,151 visitors on Sunday afternoons, as against 
70,084 in the previous year. 

The average daily attendance for all open days was 
1,301 • 8 ; for week-days only, 1,322 • 8, and for Sunday 
afternoons, 1,176. 

Siviney Lectures. 

The subject of Dr. R .F. Stharff' s first course of lectures 
on the Swiney foundation was " The Geological History of 
the European Fauna." The lectures, 12 in number, were 
again given in the theatre at the Victoria and Albert 
Museum (by permission of the Board of Education) in the 
month of November, the hour for commencement being 
experimentally altered from 5 to 6 p.m. 

The average attendance for the course was 160, as 
compared with 328 in 1905. 

Neiu Drainage System. 
The drainage of the Museum b}^ an improved system has 
been completed, the work having been carried out by His 
Majesty's Ofiice of Works, &c. 

Electric Lighting. 

The electric light having been installed in the studies 
throughout the building, the First Commissioner of His 
Majesty's Works, &;c., has been asked to submit a plan for 
lighting the galleries' for the consideration of the Trustees. 

Heating Apparatus. 
The heating apparatus, which has been in use since 1880, 
having become very defective, the Trustees have been in 
communication with the First Commissioner of His Majesty's 
Works, &c., with reference to a new installation of pipes, 
&c. for warming the building. A scheme prepared by the 
Chief Engineer of the Board of Works for the better heating 
and ventilating of the Museum is under consideration. 

g2 



100 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Telephones and Fire- Alarms. 

Telephone fire-alarms have been provided, communicating 
from ten stations in various parts of the building direct with 
the firemen's room ; also an internal telephone system, by 
means of which the several departments of the Museum are 
placed in communication. 

Geological Exploration in Egypt. 

Dr. C. W. Andrews, Assistant in the Geological Depart- 
ment, resumed in the spring of the year geological exca- 
vations in the Fayum, Egypt — the expenses of this mission 
being defrayed out of the funds generously placed at the 
disposal of the Trustees by Mr. W. E. de Winton. 

Dr. Andrews brought back numerous valuable additions 
to the collections of vertebrates already obtained from that 
locality. The most important specimens are: — (1) An 
associated skull and mandible of Palceomastodon luintoni, 
with the dentition, including the tusks, in perfect preservation. 
With these were also found several limb-bones belonging to 
the same animal. The occurrence of associated groups of 
bones in these beds is quite exceptional. (2) A beautifully 
preserved mandible of a young P alee o mastodon with the 
milk teeth in sitti, and beneath them the germs of the 
replacing premolars. The incisors are serrated at the edge 
as in the animal described as Phiomia, which, therefore, 
is probably the young of a small Palceomastodon. Other 
specimens were jaws of the Hyracoid Sagatherium and of 
the eculiar ungulate Geniohyus. Numerous remains of 
Arsinoitherium, including the greater part of a skull, were 
also collected. 

Dr. Andrews was again indebted to Captain H. G. Lyons, 
F.R.S., for much help in preparing for his expedition and in 
facilitating transport. 

Expedition to Gunong Tahan, Federated Malay States. 

An interesting collection of zoological and botanical 
specimens has been obtained for the Museum by Mr. H. C. 
Robinson, Curator of the Selangor State Museum, as the 
result of an expeclition made by him to Gunong Tahan, 
Federated Malay States, with the aid of a grant from the 
provision for purchases. 

Purchases. 

Among the more important purchases made during the 
year, special mention may be made of the following : — 

A mounted specimen of the African elephant, with pair 
of tusks and skull ; a second instalment of Dr. D. Sharp's 
collection of coleopterous insects, consisting of about 50,000 
specimens representing ten families, and including about 
1,000 types ; a collection of 4,000 birds from Eastern North 



BKITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 101 

America, the Bahama Islands, and Mexico, including many 
types ; a well-preserved skeleton of ichthyosaurus from the 
lower lias of Somersetshire, showing contained embryo— the 
only example containing an embryo hitherto discovered in 
England ; a collection of reptilian remains from the upper 
cretaceous of Transylvania, all new to the Museum, and 
including the most important series of bones of the latest 
Dinosauria hitherto discovered in Europe ; and the 
collection of fungi made by the late Mr. W. Phillips, 
comprising about 10,000 specimens, 3,200 drawings, and 
36 manuscript note-books. 



A valuable collection of Indian shells has been bequeathed 
to the Museum by the late Dr. W. T. Blanford, F.R.S. The 
bequest comprises all Dr. Blanford's type-specimens and «»uch 
other portions of his own collection as were desired for the 
Museum, and also the whole of the collection left to him 
by his brother, Mr. H. F. Blanford. The extent of the 
selection retained for the Museum is estimated at about 
2,000 specimens. 

Presents. 

The total number of presents recorded as having been 
received during the year by the several Departments of the 
Museum was 2,057, as compared with 2,092 in 1905. Many 
of these comprised large numbers of individual specimens. 
The details of all the more important of them will be found 
in the reports of the Keepers of the Departments, but the 
following are mentioned here also as being of special interest 
or importance : — 

From His Grace the Duke of Bedford. —A second collection 
of zoological specimens from Japan and Korea, consisting of 
over 500 mammals (12 being new species) and 256 birds, 
obtained by Mr. M. P. Anderson, as a further result of the 
zoological exploration of Eastern Asia which the Duke is 
carrying out ; all the specimens so collected being presented 
by him to the Trustees. 

From C. D. Rudd, Esq.— A further series of specimens 
collected by Mr. Claude Grant in South Africa, consisting 
of 235 mammals, 231 birds, and 60 reptiles and fishes, 
in continuation of the systematic survey of the fauna of 
South Africa which is being made with funds provided by 
Mr. Rudd, the specimens so obtained being presented by him 
to the Museum. 

From W. E. Balston, Esq. — An important collection of 
natural history specimens obtained by Mr. G. C. Shortridge 
in Western Australia, comprising 416 mammals, 693 birds, 
96 reptiles, &c., and including many new species. 

From the Government of India. — Large collections of 
Insects from Tibet, collected by Captain H. J. Walton, I.M.S., 
and the OlSicers of the Tibet Frontier Commission. 



102 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

From H. J. Elwes, Esq., F.R.S. — A further portion of his 
collection of butterflies, consisting of 3,930 specimens of 
Lycoenidcc, 592 Pyralidce, d^c. 

From F. D. Godman, Esq., D.C.L., F.R.S.— Further con- 
signments of Central American insects, consisting of 941 
specimens of wood-boring Coleoptera of the family Scolytidoe, 
and 214 specimens of three families of Clavicornia. 

From Mrs. Crombie. — ^The lichen-herbarium of her husband, 
the late Rev. J. M. Crombie, author of Part I. of the 
" Monograph of Lichens found in Britain," published by the 
Trustees. Much of Mr. Combie's herbarium was acquired 
for the Museum during his life-time ; the material presented 
by his widow consists of about 5,000 specimens, his licheno- 
logical manuscripts and correspondence, and 30 bound 
volumes of pamphlets. 

From Mons. H. FayoL — A series of fossil insects and fossil 
fishes from the coal measures of Commentry, Allier, France, 
the carboniferous insects in the collection being very rare. 

From the Peabody Museum of Yale University, U.S.A. — 
A life-size model of a skeleton of the gigantic toothless 
flying reptile Pteranodon lovgicej^s from the chalk of 
Kansas. 

From Mr, F. Justen. — A copy of the facsimile issue of the 
" Codex Anicise Julianse " of Dioscorides, from the original 
in the Imperial Library at Vienna. 

Exchanges and Gifts of Duplicates. 

Exchanges of duplicate specimens and casts have been 
made with several institutions and individuals. 

Certain duplicate zoological specimens have been lent 
to the International Exhibition at Marseilles, section of 
Oceanography, and safely returned to the Museum. 

The following have been added to the list of institutions 
to receive grants of duplicate specimens of Natural History, 
viz. :— the Geological Department of the University of 
Glasgow ; Salisbury, South Wilts, and Blackmore Museums, 
Salisbury ; and the Evening Education Committee of the 
Garden City, Letchworth, Herts. 

Selections of duplicate specimens have been presented, as 
follows : — 

Of zoological specimens — to the La Plata Museum ; Chad- 
wick Museum, Bolton ; the Technical Education Board of the 
London County Council ; the Infants' School, Sandy, Beds. ; 
Deiby Public Library and Museum; the Municipal Art 
Classes of Leominster and Ludlow ; the Natural tlistory 
Museum, Basle ; the Royal College of Surgeons ; the 
Government Medical School Museum, Cairo; the Rev. 
Canon Horsley ; Dr. Giinther Enderlein ; Captain H. H. 
Harington ; Dr. R. Gestro, of Genoa Museum ; Prof. T. D. A. 
Cockerell ; Mr. P. Lesne, of Paris Museum ; Mr. E. Meyrick ; 
Mr. A. Grouvelle ; Mr. S. Schenkling ; and Prof. E. L. 
Bouvier. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 103 

Of fossils and casts of fossils — to Liverpool University ; 
the Geological Department of Glasgow University ; the 
University of Aberdeen ; Dr. H. C. Sorby, F.R.S. ; Mr. R. 
Etheridge; Mr. C. S. Tomes, F.R.S. ; Mr. Carlo Jooss, of 
Stuttgart ; Mr. E. S. Goodrich, F.R.S. ; and Prof. J. Welsch. 

Of minerals — to the Geological Survey of India, Calcutta. 

Of plants— to the Royal College of Science. 

Fuhlicationfi. 

The under-mentioned works on Natural History have been 
published during the year : — 

History of the collections contained in the Natural 
History Departments of the British Museum. Vol. IT. 
Department of Zoology. Pp. 782. 8vo. 30s. 

Descriptive Catalogue of the Tertiary Vertebrata of the 
Fayum, Egypt. Based on the collection of the Egyptian 
Government in the Geological Museum, Cairo, and on the 
collection in the British Museum (Natural History). By 
O. W. Andrews, D.Sc, F.R.S. Pp. xxxvii, 324 : 98 text- 
figures and 26 plates. 4to. 35s. 

Illustrations of British Blood-sucking Flies, with notes by 
E. E. Austen. Pp. 74 : 34 coloured plates. Roy. 8vo. 25s. 

Catalogue of the Lepidoptera Phalsense (Moths) in the 
British Museum. Vol. VI. Noctuidse (Cucullianse). By Sir 
G. F. Hampson, Bart. Pp. xiv, 532 : 172 woodcuts. 8vo. 15s. 
Atlas of 12 coloured plates. 8vo. 10s. 

Synonymic Catalogue of Orthoptera. Vol. II. Orthoptera 
Saltatoria. Pt. I. Achetidse et Phasgonuridse. By W. F. 
Kirby. Pp. viii, 562. 8vo. 15s. 

Synonymic Catalogue of Homoptera. Part I. Cicadidse. 
By W. L. Distant. Pp. 207. 8vo. 5s. 

Catalogue of the Madreporarian Corals in the British 
Museum (Natural History). Vol. VI. The Family Poritidaf. 
11. — The Genus Porites. Part II. — Porites of the Atlantic 
and West Indies, with the European Fossil Forms. The 
Genus Goniopora, a supplement to Vol. IV. By H. M. 
Bernard. Pp. vi, 173: 17 plates. 4to. 20s. 

Guide to the Galler}^ of Reptilia and Amphibia in the 
Department of Zoology. (By R. Lydekker, F.R.S.) Pp. iv, 
75 : 76 text and other figures. 8vo. 6d. 

Books and Portraits illustrating the History of Plant 
Classification exhibited in the Department of Botany. (By 
A. B. Rendle, D.Sc.) Pp. 19 : 4 plates. 8vo. M. 

New editions have been issued of the General Guide 
(11th edition), price 3^. ; Guide to the Mammals (other than 
Ungulates), price 6d. ; Handbook of Instructions for Collectors 
(3rd edition), price Is. 6d. ; Instructions for Collecting 



104 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Mammals (3rd edition), Blood-sucking Flies (2nd edition), 
Spiders, Myriopods, &c. (2nd edition), and Fossils and 
Minerals (3rd edition), price Sd. each ; and, for gratuitous 
distribution, of the list of Casts of Fossils reproduced from 
specimens in the Department of Geology. 

The natural history publications of the Museum have been 
sent to many Free Libraries and other institutions in Great 
Britain and Ireland, to Colonial, Indian, and Foreign 
Museums, Libraries, and Scientific Societies, and to various 
individuals who have either assisted in the preparation of the 
volumes or otherwise benefited the Museum ; and several 
additions have been made to the publications exchange list. 

Having regard to the importance of a study of blood- 
sucking flies in connection with the dissemination of diseases 
due to micro-organisms, especially in tropical countries, the 
Trustees propose to continue the series of publications on 
these insects, a commencement of which was made by the 
issue of the Monographs of Mosquitoes and Tsetse Flies. 
The material available being insulSicient for this purpose, the 
assistance of the Foreign Office, Colonial Office, and India 
Office has been obtained in the distribution of copies of a 
circular letter and pamphlet on the subject to the officials of 
those departments serving abroad, with a view to the forma- 
tion of a collection of specimens to serve as the basis of the 
proposed monographs. Considerable collections of flies, fee. 
have already been received from all parts of the world, and 
are being worked out. In the meantime the Trustees^ have 
published the volume of Illustrations of British Blood-sucking 
Flies noticed above (p. 103). 

The following works are also in preparation : — 

Catalogue of the Library, Vol. III. 

Report on the Natural History Collections of the " Dis- 
covery " Antarctic Expedition, 1901-4. 

Catalogue of Bats, by Dr. Knud Andersen. 

Hand-list of Birds, Vol. V., by Dr. R. B. Sharpe. 

Catalogue of Birds' Eggs, Vol. V., by W. R. Ogilvie Grant. 

Monograph of Mosquitoes, Vol. IV., by F. V. Theobald. 

Monograph of British Lichens, Vol. II., by Miss A. Lorrain 
Smith. 

Monograph of Mycetozoa, Second Edition, by A. Lister, 
F.R.S. 

Catalogue of Fossil Rodentia, by C. I. Forsyth-Major. 

Catalogue of Fossil Fishes, Vol. V., by Dr. A. Smith 
Woodward, F.R.S. 

Catalogue of Cretaceous Bryozoa, Vol. II., by Dr. J. W. 
Gregory, F.R.S. 

Catalogue of Trilobites, by Philip Lake. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 105 

A Guide to Great Game Animals. 
A Guide to the Insect Gallery. 

A Guide to British Seed -Plants and Ferns, by Dr. A. B. 
Rendle. 



General Library. 

The additions to the General Library during the past year 
have been : — 

By purchase - . _ 458 volumes. 

By donation - _ - 532 volumes, 8 maps, and 

19 photographs. 
By transfer from other 

Departments - - 45 volumes. 

Total - - 1,035 volumes, 8 maps, and 
19 photographs. 

All the volumes and maps have been catalogued, press- 
marked, and put in their places, while 1,019 volumes have 
been bound in 493, 121 have been repaired, and 4 maps have 
been mounted. 

The extent of the collection on the 31st December was 
35,842 volumes, 5,615 maps, and 334 photographs (not includ- 
ing those in the Owen Collection of Drawings, &c.)- 

The accessions to the Departmental Libraries have also 
been catalogued as they came in, and duplicate transcripts of 
the titles have been returned with the books. 

Altogether 1,937 title-slips have been written, 82 re- 
written, and 2,370 revised. 

There are now, on a rough estimate, 82,930 volumes 
(exclusive of continuations and minor separata) and 5,900 
maps in the whole building. 

The printing of the Catalogue remained in abeyance 
during the year, but preparations for its resumption are 
being made. 

The works of travel and other non-serial publications 
were re-arranged and re-press-marked on the elastic system, 
in the course of which the press-marks were altered in more 
than 4,000 volumes and on nearly 6,000 title-slips. 

Seven sets of sheets 137 to 140 of the Catalogue have been 
stamped with index-letters showing in which Department 
the various works are to be found, and copies have been 
distributed to each department. 

The compilation of a List of Books, fee, published by or 
relating to the Natural History Departments of the British 
Museum, has been completed. 

The following papers dealing with Works in the Museum 
have been published in various journals during 1906 : — 

" On the Dates of Publication of the Natural History 
portions of the ' Encj'-clopedie Methodique.' " By C. Davies 
Sherborn and B. B. Woodward. (Annals and Mag. Nat. Hist., 
Ser. VII., Vol. vii., pp. 577-82.) 



106 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The botanical part, with an additional note by Mr. 
\\'oodward, was reprinted as — 

"■ The dates of Publication of Lamarck's ' Encyclopedie 
Methodique ' (Botany)." (Journ. Bot., 1906, pp. 318-20.) 

[Dates of Publication of the] " Atlas der Diatomaceen- 
Kunde. Herausgegeben von A. Schmidt." (Journ. Bot., 
1906, pp. 384-86.) 

The number of visits paid to the Library during the year 
by students and others (irrespective of the Staff) was 1,357. 



Index Museum and Morphological Collections. 

During the past year a series of Crabs has been put on 
exhibition in th.e Entrance Hall, showing the extent to which 
the external appearance, particularly that of the secondary 
sexual organs, may become altered in consequence of the 
Crab being attacked by the parasite Sacculina. The series 
of specimens illustrating the general characters of Birds' 
Eggs, the range in shape, colour, texture, and thickness of 
shell, and number in the clutch, has been removed from the 
wall-case in Bay 3 of the Hall to a more prominent and 
better lit position on the sides of the arch of Bay 5. The 
wall-case from which the series was removed has been fitted 
with a new back, obliquely placed so as to receive as much 
light as possible from the skylight of the Hall. In this case 
is now displayed the specimens of Birds' wings and tails 
which are too large to exhibit in the table-case. 

The series of Peas illustrating the Mendelian hypothesis 
of heredity has been placed in one of the new obliquely set 
cases in Bay 8, where it is brought more to the notice of the 
public and is better lit than in the table-case of Bay 6, where 
it was previously exhibited. 

During the summer, shortly after the eruption of Vesuvius, 
there was placed temporarily in the Entrance Hall a series of 
specimens of lava and scoriae thrown up by Vesuvius during 
the last and during the previous eruption, and also photo- 
graphs and charts showing the change in the form of the 
volcano brought about by the eruption. 

Two models have been added to the Malaria Case in the 
Hall — one of the proboscis of the Mosquito before piercing the 
skin, and another of the proboscis in the act of piercing. 

Occupying a central position in the Hall — a position 
previously taken by the Tsetse Case, which has now been put 
in Bay 6 — is a table-case in which are shown three series of 
Plaice illustrating the different sizes attained by the fish in 
different parts of the North Sea and English Channel in the 
same periods of time, the ages of the fish being determined 
by the number of rings on the otoliths, a series of which is 
also exhibited. Also a series of Pollack showing the rate of 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 107 

growth, the age of the fish being determined by the number 
of rings on the scales, a series of which is exhibited to illus- 
trate the method. Also a series of the young of the Eel, and 
a map to show the position of the breeding ground in the 
Atlantic Ocean, and the points reached by the eastwardJy- 
migrating Elvers in different months of the year. 

Much work has been done in the way of re-mounting and 
re-spiriting such of the anatomical preparations in the 
Entrance Hall as were in need of attention. 

The models and casts of the Deep Sea Fishes temporarily 
exhibited in the Entrance Hall are now displayed in a 
horizontal table-case in the Fish Gallery, with an introduc- 
tory label explaining the general characters in which deep 
sea fishes diff'er from other fishes. 



Economic Zoology. 



The work in connection with this section has had reference 
chiefly to insects. The questions submitted have mostly been 
from medical men abroad who are investigating the spread of 
disease by the agency of insects, and also from persons who 
ask for the names of pests, or for advice as to the best method 
of destroying them. 

The following are some of the subjects of inquiry : — 

(1.) "The Nimetta or jVemetti Fly " of Dongola, sent 
from Khartoum for identification, with the note 
that " Besides biting, the flies are an intolerable 
" nuisance through getting into the nose and 
" eyes, causing all work to be suspended." The 
species proved to be Simulium griseicollis. 
(2.) Inquiry whether Glossina ijal-palis, one of the 
Tsetse Flies, occurs in S. Africa, and whether 
any other species of Glossina has been shown 
to carry Trypanosoma gambiense. And from 
another correspondent, whether Glossina pal- 
palis is limited by altitude and always lives in 
close proximity to large rivers and lakes. 
G. palpalis does not occur in S. Africa, and 
even G. morsitans is not found south of St. Lucia 
Lake. At time of writing no species of Glossina 
other than G. p)alpalis had yet been proved to 
carry Trypanosoma gambiense, but since there 
is reason to believe that several species of 
Glossina besides morsitans can carry Trypano- 
soma brucei, it is quite possible that G. palpalis 
is not the only species capable of conveying 
T. gambiense. All available evidence goes to 
show that Glossina palpalis is only found in 
close proximity to water (which may, however, 



108 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

be quite a small stream), and it is unlikely that 
it is an exception to the rule that Tsetse Flies 
are not met with at altitudes above 3,000 or 
4,000 feet. 
(3.) Fly sent from Mauritius as being found to contain 
Trypanosomes. Species proved to be Stomoxys 
nigra. 

(4.) Questions as to swarms of common House Fly and 
where they come from. They normally breed in 
horse dung. 

(5.) Inquiry from Egypt as to the name of small moth 
destructive to cotton bolls. Proved to be an 
undescribed species, since named Stagmatophora 
gossypiella by Lord Walsingham. 

(6.) Inquiry from the Seychelles for name of a 

beetle injuring cocoa-nut palms. Melittomma 

insularis. 
(7.) Inquiry for name of beetle injuring palm trees in 

Uganda. Rhynchophorus phmnicis. 
(8.) Inquiry for name of caterpillars eating Lily of 

the Valley. One of the Ghost moths, Hepialus. 
(9.) Inquiry for name of small beetle injuring oranges 

in New Zealand. Cylas turcipennis. 
(10.) Inquiry from Merioneth respecting grubs very 

injurious to pasture. Phyllopertha horticola. 
(11.) Inquiry from Ceylon as to beetle injurious to Para 

rubber plants. Xylopertha nicoharica. 

The following are some of the additions made to the series 
exhibited in the North Hall: — 

(1.) Egyptian Cotton Worm. Prodenia littoralis. 

(2.) Small Cotton Worm. Caradrina exigua, 

(3.) Egyptian Cotton Stainer. Oxycarenus hyalini- 

'pennis. 
(4.) Lac insects and their products. 
(5.) White wax insects. 
(6.) Ash saplings injured by rabbits. 
(7.) Human thread worms. 
(8.) Caterpillars of Buff-tip moth. 
(9.) Scotch fir damaged by Tortrix. 
(10.) Currant-root louse. Schizoneura fodiens. 

' E. Ray Lankester, 

British Museum (Natural History), Director. 

23 February 1907. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 109 



Department of Zoology". 

I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Mammalia. — A heavy piece of work during the year has 
been the numbering of the exhibited specimens — a task 
which is still uncompleted, so far as the skulls and horns in 
the lower gallery and corridors are concerned. 

In the upper gallery no noticeable change or alteration 
has been made, work having been in the main confined to the 
ordinary measures of conservation, labelling, &c. Two of the 
wall-cases, namely, those on each side of the entrance, have, 
however, been painted green. 

As regards the lower gallery and corridor, it was found 
during the summer to be unsafe to continue to exhibit heads of 
Deer in the east corridor unprotected by glass, owing to the 
injuries resulting from moth. It was accordingly arranged to 
alter two of the Deer cases on the north side of the lower gallery 
in such a manner that accommodation could be found for 
the specimens in the corridor. This was accomplished by 
removing the partitions to the height of the main door, and 
shifting the position of the partitions above that level. The 
cases were then painted green (in place of white). A similar 
treatment has been accorded to one of the adjacent Antelope 
cases, with the result that not only has the general 
appearance of the cases and their contained specimens been 
greatly improved, but a considerable amount of valuable 
space has been gained for exhibition purposes. 

Artificial ground work has been added to two deer-cases 
and one of the Gazelle-cases, with highly satisfactory results. 

A large number of the labels in the lower gallery and 
corridors have been re-printed or re- written, in order either to 
bring them up to the present level of zoology or to render 
them more easily legible. 

Among the presentations included in the exhibition series, 
the following may be specially mentioned : — A Lion, a Chita, 
a black-backed Jackal, an Oribi Antelope, and a Livingstone's 
Antelope, presented by Allan Cameron, Esq. ; a Spanish 
Lynx, presented by B. F. Buck, Esq. ; the type specimen of 
the Ituri Black Honey-Badger or Ratel, presented by Major 
P. H. G. Powell Cotton ; an Alaskan Elk, presented by the 
Hon. Walter Rothschild ; Head of an American Elk, pre- 
sented by Frank Hutt, Esq. ; Head of a Cassiar Caribou, 
presented by G. M. Norrie, Es^. ; a Cassiar and a Newfound- 
land Caribou, presented by F. C. Selous, Esq. ; a Black-tailed 
Deer, presented by W. R. Thompson, Esq. ; a Liu Kiu Sika 
Deer, presented by His Grace the Duke of Bedford, K.G. ; 
Head of a South American Marsh-deer, presented by A. F. 
Vans Agnew, Esq. ; a Situtunga Antelope, presented by 
Capt. J. Harington ; the type head of Vaughan's Kob 



110 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Antelope and a head of the Reed-buck, presented by Capt. 
P. E. Vaughan ; the type head of Patterson's Eland, pre- 
sented by Lt.-Col. J. H. Patterson ; a Chamois, presented by 
St George Littledale, Esq. ; Skull and cast of horn of African 
Black Rhinoceros (abnormal), presented by Frank Baden 
Powell, Esq. 

The purchased specimens added to the series during the 
year are not numerous. Foremost is the male African 
Elephant, from South Nyasaland, placed in the Entrance 
Hall. In the anthropological series reference may be made 
to a plaster cast of the bust of a Pigmy from the Ituri Forest, 
modelled by W. Goscombe John, Esq. The purcha.ses also 
include an Indian wild Boar and a West African River-Hog. 

No re-arrangements or additions of specimens have been 
made in the AVhale Room during the year. 

In the British Saloon the mounting of special groups of 
British Mammals has been largely advanced during the 
year, and is now approaching completion. Several new 
cases have been provided. The groups newly mounted 
include the Bats, which have been placed on and around 
a hollow tree-stem, the Rats and Mice (among which special 
attention may be directed to the Harvest-mice and Shrew- 
mice), and the Marten-cats. 

The donations include a Fair Isle long-tailed Field-mouse, 
presented by N. B. Kinnear, Esq. ; a Harvest-mouse, pre- 
sented by the Hon. Charles N. Rothschild ; and a Natterer's 
Bat, presented by Heatley Noble, Esq. A Marten-cat was 
purchased. 

Domesticated Animals : — Beyond referring to the 
normal duties of curatorship, and the addition of new 
descriptive labels, &c., there is nothing demanding special 
notice in regard to the technique of this section. 

The presentations to this series include the following : — 
Skull and Limb-bones of the Thoroughbred Stallion " Royal 
Hampton," presented by Mrs. Ballard ; Head and Skull of 
Shire Mare " Starlight," presented by Mrs. Crisp ; a Banting 
Ox from Bali, presented by C. B. Kloss, Esq. ; Heads of the 
Short-horn Bulls " Tregunter " and " Knight of the Shire," 
presented by the Shorthorn Society ; a Merino and a Fat- 
tailed Sheep, presented by the Director of Agriculture, Cape 
Colony ; two Skulls of the Corsican Sheep (?), presented by 
Dr. C. J. Forsyth-Major; Horns of Azores Goats, presented 
by Major Chaver ; Head of Chartley Cow, presented by His 
Grace the Duke of Bedford, K.G. ; skeleton of a Tibet Dog, 
presented by the Zoological Society ; a Harrier, presented by 
J. S. Gibbons, Esq. ; a Borzoi, presented by G. Pauling, Esq. ; 
a Blaek-and-tan King Charles Spaniel, " Bend-Or," presented 
by Mrs. J. Reed ; Ruby King Charles Spaniel, presented by 
Mrs. Kate Stephens ; a Pekinese Dog, " Ah Cam," presented 
by T Douglas Murray, Esq.; a Blenheim Spaniel, presented 
by Mr. E. Longtone ; the Head of a Bull-Terrier, presented by 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. Ill 

Rowland Ward, Esq.; the celebrated Chinchilla Persian 
Cat, " The Silver Lambkin," presented by Mrs.L. B. Balding ; 
sketch of the Head of a Unicoin Tibetan Sheep, by Miss 
Nellie Hadden ; three hybrid Pheasants, presented respectively 
by the Hon. Florence Amherst, A. E. Scott, Esq., and 
Rowland Ward, Esq. ; two Penguin Ducks from Java, presented 
by Dr. M. Treub. 

Albinos and semi-albinos include a Dormouse, presented 
by H. J. Bailey, Esq. ; a Marten and a Swallow, the gift of 
W. RadclifFe Saunders, Esq. ; a Wood-Pigeon, presented by 
Sir Arthur Clay ; and a Blackbird, given by W. Reid, Esq. 

In the study series the work of labelling, registering, and 
incorporating the additions has been proceeded with. Many 
old skins have been re-made by the taxidermist in accordance 
with modern methods, and over three thousand skulls have 
been cleaned by the articulator, labelled and put away. 

Three new deal store cabinets have been added with 
drawers deep enough to receive animals the size of a fox. 

Much valuable assistance has been given in the depart- 
ment by voluntary helpers who have described new forms as 
they have been acquired, and have assisted in labelling and 
incorporating the new arrivals. The following gentlemen 
should be specially mentioned : — Dr. Forsyth-Major, Mr. R. C. 
Wroughton, Mr. J. L. Bonhote, Mr. Harold vSchwann, and 
Major G. E. H. Barrett-Hamilton. 

By the assistance of a private donor the services of 
Dr. Knud Andersen have been continued in working out and 
re-labelling the collection of Chiroptera in preparation for 
his forthcoming work on the new edition of the Catalogue. 

Aves. — In the Bird Gallery continued progress has been 
made in the substitution of well-mounted specimens in place 
of old ones which had become bleached and discoloured. 
During the past year a number of skeletons and birds in 
spirit have been added to the collection. A considerable 
number of specimens belonging to the old series have been 
examined and carefully determined, and the skeletons of the 
following families have been re-arranged and catalogued :— 
Fittidce, Tyrannidce, Hirundinidoe, Muscicapidw, Laniidos, 
Prionopidce, Malaconotidce, Gymnorhinidce, Artamidce. 

Reptilia and Batrachia. — False backs have been put in 
the wall-cases in the Reptile Gallery, containing the Ichthyo- 
saurs and Plesiosaurs, thereby enabling the specimens to be 
brought nearer to the front, so that they may be seen to 
greater advantage. 

The most striking addition to the gallery is the model 
of the Iguanodon skeleton, removed from the Geological 
Department ; for this a new stand was prepared. 

Various details and improvements in the arrangement and 
description of the specimens have been carried out. Among 



112 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

these, reference may be made to the display of a series of 
skulls of Crocodilians to illustrate the passage from the long 
and slender type characteristic of the Gharial to the short 
and broad form distinctive of Alligators. The process of 
weeding out undesirable specimens has been still further 
carried out, and progress has also been made in the matter of 
painting specimens. 

A number of coloured illustrations of reptiles (chiefly the 
gift of Mrs. John Anderson) have been placed either in the 
cases or in separate frames. 

The more important specimens presented for exhibition 
purposes during the year are the following, viz. : — A green 
Turtle, presented by T. K. Bellis, Esq. ; a South African 
Tortoise (Testudo tentoria), to illustrate a new method of 
mounting, presented by Dr. J. E. Duerden ; a Southern 
Anaconda, presented by the Hon. Walter Rothschild ; a young 
Gaboon Puff- Adder and a skull of an adult of the same species, 
presented by Rowland Ward, Esq. 

The new cases in the spirit building have been completed 
and the Batrachian collection has been arranged in them. 

Pisces. — During the year 63 specimens of fishes have been 
restored and coloured according to published coloured figures 
and descriptions, in continuation of the work referred to in 
the last annual report. A series of 16 British salmonoid 
fishes has been placed on exhibition in a special table-case. 
Based upon the detailed descriptions and drawings published 
by palaeontologists and upon actual fossils in the Geological 
Department of the Museum, restored models have been 
constructed of the following extinct fishes — Coccosteus, 
Holoptychius, Eusthenopteron, Megalichthys (head only), 
Osteolepis, Undina, Cheirodus, Chondrosteus, Hypsocormus, 
Eugnathus, and Leptolepis. 

The south half of the Fish Gallery has been re-opened to 
the public, and the north half, where re-arrangement is still 
in progress, has been partitioned off. Of notable additions to 
the Gallery may be mentioned a large Raia marginata, a large 
Electric Ray, and a large Angler-fish. 

The card-catalogue of specimens selected for exhibition — 
each card giving the British Museum register number, locality, 
and history of the specimen, and the references to the figures 
and descriptions from which it was coloured — has been 
increased by 226 entries. 

The determination and arrangement of the collection of 
Fishes from the Nile has been completed. The American 
Fishes of the family Cichlidse have been re-arranged in 
accordance with a recent revision. The new cases in the spirit 
building have now been completed, and the Batrachian col- 
lection has been removed to them ; this has made possible 
the expansion and re- arrangement of part of the Fish 
collection, with which considerable progress has been made. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 113 

iMollusca. — The working out of the important collection of 
deep-sea Mollusca, obtained by H.M. Indian Survey Steamer 
" Investigator," commenced during the year 1905, has been 
completed, and the report published. A manuscript list of 
the species of Polyplacophora has also been prepared. A 
large collection of shells made by the late Colonel Surgeon 
Archer at Singapore and other localities has been examined, 
and a selection made from it. The important collection of 
Indian land and fresh-water shells, bequeathed by the late 
Dr. W. T. Blanford, has been unpacked and partly examined. 
Numerous species of land shells forming part of the exhibited 
series have been remounted on fresh tablets and furnished 
with printed labels. The collection contained in spirit has 
been attended to, and fresh spirit supplied where necessary. 

Arachnida and Myriopoda. — The spirit collection of 
Arachnomorphoe and of Myriopoda has undergone re- 
arrangement, and part of the unnamed material has been 
sorted into families. The Scorpions and Pedipalpi have been 
worked out. Many Ticks received were sent before registra- 
tion to Professor Neumann for determination, and a report, 
based on these examinations, will appear shortly. Herr With 
has continued his work on the Chelonethi belonging to the 
Museum, and an additional report dealing with the South 
American forms is now in course of publication. 

Insecta. — The task of transferring the portion of the Fry 
Collection of Coleoptera contained in cabinets was finished in 
the spring, and the cabinets returned to the executors. The 
greater part of the specimens so transferred, including the 
whole of the Lamellicornia and Longicornia, is now incor- 
porated in the General Collection. 

A second portion of the Sharp Collection of Coleoptera 
has been acquired, comprising the Geodephaga, Clavicornia, 
Palpicornia, Heteromera.. &c., about 50,000 specimens in all. 
The Central American specimens of water-beetles and certain 
Clavicorn families, including a large number of types, have 
been labelled and incorporated in the Central American 
Collection. 

Some further progress has been made with the incor- 
"poration of the Janson Collection of Elateridce. The un- 
determined American Cleridce have been worked out by 
Herr Schenkling, of the German Entomological National 
Museum, and the Oriental specimens of the' family have been 
sent to him for the same purpose. All the Museum repre- 
sentatives of the genera Ichthyurus and Sciobius have been 
determined or described by Dr. R. Gestro and Mr. Guy 
Marshall, respectively, and have since been completely 
re-arranged. 

In connection with the preparation of the Second Volume 
of the Catalogue of Orthoptera the later groups of Phasgo- 
nuridcB have been re-arranged or revised in accordance with it. 
105. H 



114 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

That volume, containing the families Achetidce and Phasgo- 
nuridce, has teen published and the manuscript of the Third 
Volume, dealing with the Locustidce, is in course of revision. 

A synonymic catalogue of the Homopterous family Cica- 
didcehsiS been published, and the revision and re-arrangement 
of the collection of Fulgoridce have been continued. 

A large number of additions to the collection of British 
Diptera, presented by Lieut.-Col. Yerbury, have been deter- 
mined and incorporated, and the blood-sucking species of the 
genus Ceratopogon in the collection have been worked out. 

The order of the families in the General Collection of 
Diptera has, so far as possible, been brought up to date. 

The family Simulidce has been worked out, and the new 
species in the collection have been described, by Mons. E» 
Roubaud, of Paris. 

The family AlyphidcB has been revised and arranged, and 
the species belonging to the genus Stomoxys (family Muscidce) 
have been provisionally determined. 

A considerable number of small collections of blood- 
sucking Diptera from various parts of the world have been 
provisionally determined, reported upon, and incorporated. 

Miss G. Ricardo has continued her determination of the 
Tabanidce. 

The work of re-setting and re-constituting the collection 
of British Lepidoptera has been completed. 

The collection of IthomiancB and Heliconinoe, with the 
exception of the Hewitson specimens, have been transferred 
and partially re-arranged in the new cabinets, and the greater 
part of the Nymphaline genera of the Cethosia, Apatura^ 
Euthalia, and Siderone groups have also been transferred 
and re-arranged. The specimens belonging to the Ancea 
group were determined by Mr. H. Druce. The remainder of 
the Hewitson Pierince have been incorporated with the 
General Collection. 

Mr. H. J. Elwes has concluded the arrangement of the 
Palsearctic Lyccenidce and commenced that of the Hes- 
periidce. 

The volume of the Catalogue of Moths containing the 
Noctuid sub-family CucuUiance has been finished and re- 
vised for press, and considerable progress has been made with 
that containing the Acronyctince. 

The Noctuid sub-families Catocalince, Momince, and 
PlusiancE and part of Noctuince have been re-arranged, as 
well as parts of the sub-families Boarmiance and Pyraiistince, 
and the Tineid genus Imma. 

The Moths collected by Mr. Meade-Waldo during Lord 
Crawford's voyage, the collection made by the Ruwenzori 
Expedition and various smaller collections have been worked 
out, and nearly all accessions have been incorporated with 
the Genera] Collection 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 115 

In the Hymenoptera the family Mutillidce has been 
expanded and completely re-arranged. 

Crustacea. — Progress has been made in arranging and 
labelling the exhibited series of Crustacea, and a large 
number of additional specimens have been prepared and 
tinted in natural colours. The systematic series of Anomura 
and Macrura are on the point of completion. The entire 
spirit collection has been overhauled, the bottles relilled where 
necessary, and generic labels placed on the shelves to facilitate 
reference. A special collection presented by Mr. Geoffrey 
Smith, illustrating the changes produced in certain Crabs by 
the presence of parasites, has been mounted and arranged as 
a temporary exhibit in one of the bays of the central hall. 
Important exchanges have been carried out during the year 
with the Museums of Calcutta, Paris, Washington, and 
Pittsburgh. The undetermined material of terrestrial Isopoda 
has been sent for study to Herr G, Budde-Lund of Copen- 
hagen, and a number of African Phyllopoda have been sent 
for the same purpose to Dr. E. Wolf, of Frankfurt a/M. 
The Macrurous Crustacea of the Third Tanganyika Expedition 
have b°en studied and reported on, and the first part of 
a report on Cumacea received from the Copenhagen Museum 
has been prepared for publication. 

Echinoderma.* — A fine example of Centrostephanus 
rodgersi has been addded to the exhibited series. The MSS. 
Catalogue of the Crinoidea has been brought up to date. 
All the Echinoderma obtained during the year have been 
identified and incorporated. 

Vermes * — Dr. Ashworth has made a preliminary exami- 
nation of the Polychseta before commencing a catalogue. 
Dr. Fowler has determined various Chsetognaths ; Dr. 
Meixner some Planarians ; Dr. Linstow the Nematodes sub- 
mitted to him ; and Mr. F. F. Laidlaw some Turbellarians. 
Thanks to the assistance of these specialists, all the Worms 
obtained during the year have been determined. 

Anthozoa* — The sixth volume of the Catalogue of Corals 
has been published, this completes the description of the 
forms belonging to the suborder Entocnemaria. 

A fine specimen of Gorgonella verriculata has been 
mounted for exhibition in the Coral Gallery. The specimens 
of Porites are now arranged in the cupboards of the Coral- 
room in the order of the published Catalogue. 

Advantage was taken of the visit of Mr. Simpson to 
re-spirit many of the specimens of Alcyonaria which he came 
to study. 

Tunicata, Brachiopoda, Polyzoa, Hydrozoa, Porifera, 
and Protozoa. — Most of the time that could be spared by the 
assistant in charge of these groups from the usual official routine 

* The time of the assistant in charge of these groups has been largely 
devoted to the " Discovery " collections. 

H 2 



116 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

work of attending to visitors, correspondence, conservation 
and arrangement of specimens has been devoted to the 
working out and description of the Hadromerine and 
Halichondrine Sponges collected by the " Discovery " in the 
Antarctic ; the report upon the Hadromerina being illustrated 
by five quarto plates, and the Halichondrina by ten quarto 
plates. 

The Sponges collected by the Third Tanganyika Expedition 
have been described and figured.. 

A second edition of the Guide to the Coral Gallery has 
been prepared, giving a more full account of the Sporozoa 
(including the blood parasites of Malaria and Sleeping 
Sickness). 

In the course of working out the " Discovery " Sponges, 
a large number of preparations of other Sponges have been 
made ; these will form part of a general collection of prepa- 
rations of the whole collection of Sponges, which will be of 
great use to students of this group. 

II. — Duplicates and Exchanges. 

Duplicates have been presented to the Infants' School, 
Sandy, Bedfordshire ; the Municipal Art Classes of Leo- 
minster, Ludlow, and Letchworth ; the Chadwick Museum, 
Bolton ; Rev. Canon Horsley ; the Technical Education 
Board of the London County Council ; the Royal College of 
Surgeons ; the Derby and Edinburgh Museums. 

Exchanges have been effected with the Museums of Paris, 
Berlin, Dresden, Basle, Genoa, Singapore ; the Indian Museum, 
Calcutta ; the Selangor State Museum ; the Field Museum 
of Natural History, Chicago ; the Hungarian National 
Museum ; and with M. Antoine Grouvelle, Dr. Norman Joy, 
Dr. M. Cameron, Messrs. Philip de la Garde, A. J. Chitty, 
H. K. Donisthorpe, H. Munt, H. B. Preston, 0. E. Janson, 
Major R. Sparrow, Prof. F. Guitel, Dr. W. Wolterstorff, 
Prof. Bouvier, Dr. A. E. Ortman, and Prof. Joubin. 

III. — Departmental Library. 

One hundred and eleven separate works in 163 volumes, 
new to the Library, and 1,187 parts of periodicals and works 
in progress have been acquired during the year by purchase, 
presentation, and exchange. Two hundred and ninety-three 
books have been bound. The Library now contains 11,021 
separate works in 17,433 volumes. 

The work of collating, press-marking, and entering in the 
Catalogue of all acquisitions has been performed as usual. 

IV. — Fuhlicatiovs. 

In addition to the Catalogues already referred to, published 
by the Trustees, the following reports and descriptive papers 
have been prepared in connection with various parts of the 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 117 

collection, especially recent acquisitions, and have been 
published in scientific journals : — 

Mammalia. — "On the Generic Arrangement of the 
Australian Rats hitherto referred to Conilurus, with Remarks 
on the Structure and Evolution of their Molar Cusps"; 
" A new Aquatic Genus of Muridse discovered by Consul 
L. Soderstrom in Ecuador"; " New Asiatic Mammals of the 
Genera Kerivoula, Eliomys, and Lepus " ; "A new Genus 
of Free tail Bat from N.E. Africa"; "A Third Genus of 
the Ichthyomys Group"; "New African Mammals of the 
Genera Cercopithecus, Scotophilus, Miniopterus, Crocidura, 
Georychus, and Heliophobius " ; "Three new Palsearctic 
Mammals"; "New Mammals from the Australian Region " ; 
"Descriptions of new Mammals from Ruwenzori"; "Two 
new Genera of small Mammals discovered by Mrs. Holms- 
Tarn in British East Africa " ; " Notes on South- American 
Rodents"; 'On a new Pigmy Antelope obtained by Col. 
J. J. Harrison in the Semliki Forest " ; " New Insectivores 
and Voles collected by Mr. A. Robert near Trebizond " ; " On 
'some African Bats and Rodents " : " New Mammals collected 
in North-east Africa by Mr. Zaphiro, and presented to the 
British Museum by W. N. McMillan, Esq." ; " On a Second 
Sp3cies of Lenothrix from the Liu Kiu Islands"; "Anew 
Vole from Spain " ; " On a new Forest-Pig from the Ja River, 
Cameroons " ; "A new Species of Duiker from Nyasaland " ; 
" On Mammals from Northern Australia, presented to the 
National Museum by Sir Wm. Ingram, Bart., and the Hon. 
John Forrest " ; " On a new Form of Bear from the Shan 
States " ; " On Mammals collected in South-west Australia 
for Mr. W. E. Balston " ; " On a Collection of Mammals from 
Persia and Armenia, presented to the British Museum by 
Col. A . C. Bailward " ; " The Duke of Bedford's Zoological 
Exploration in Eastern Asia. — I. List of Mammals obtained 
by Mr. M. P. Anderson in Japan " ; by O. Thomas. 

" The Rudd Exploration of South Africa. — IV. List of 
Mammals obtained by Mr. Grant at Knysna"; "The Rudd 
Exploration of South Africa.— V. List of Mammals obtained 
by Mr. Grant in N.E. Transvaal"; by Oldfield Thomas and 
Harold Schwann. 

" A List of the Mammals obtained by Messrs. R. B. 
Woosnam and R. E. Dent in Bechuanaland, " by Harold 
Schwann. " On the Mammals of Crete," by Dorothea M. A. 
Bate. " On the Mouse-Hares of the genus Ochotona, " " On 
a new Race of Sciurus lokrioides from Burma"; "On a 
Collection of Mammals brought home by the Tibet Frontier 
Commission"; "The Mammalian Fauna of China.— Part I. 
Murin.'e " : " On Mammals from South Johore and Singapore, 
collected by Mr. C. B. Kloss " ; by J. Lewis Bonhote. 
" On some Mammals collected by Mr. Robin Kemp in 
S. Nigeria " ; " Notes on the genus Tatera, with descriptions 
of new species " ; by R. C. Wroughton. 



118 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Aves. — " History of the Collections in the British Museum 
(Nat. Hist.). Aves," by R. Bowdler Sharpe. Pp. 79-515. 

Owing to the time occupied in the preparation of the 
above volume, the publication of the 5th volume of the 
" Handlist of Birds " and the 5th volume of the " Catalogue 
of Eggs " has had to be postponed till the present year 
(1907). 

" On a Collection of Birds made by Mr. Geoffrey Archer 
during a Journey to the Ruwenzori Range " ; by F. J Jackson, 
with notes by R. Bowdler Sharpe. 

" On the Birds collected by Mr. Walter Goodfellow on the 
Volcano of Apo and in its vicinity, in South-east Mindanao, 
Philippine Islands " ; " On a new Tree-Partridge from the 
Chin Hills " ; " On the Eclipse Plumage of Ducks " ; " On a 
new species of Nut-hatch from Corea " ; " On two new 
species from South-east Mindanao " ; " On new species from 
Ruwerzori"; "On new species from Central Formosa"; 
" On a new species of the genus Proparus from the Manipur 
Hills " ; by W. R. Ogilvie Grant. 

Reptiles and Batrachians. — " Report on the Batrachians 
collected by the late L. Fea in West Africa"; "Report on 
the Reptiles collected by the late L. Fea in West Africa' 
"Additions to the Herpetology of British East Africa' 
'Descriptions of new Batrachians from South Cameroon' 
" Descriptions of two new Lizards from New Zealand. ' 
" Descriptions of new Reptiles from Yunnan " ; " Description 
of a new Tree Viper from Mount Ruwenzori " ; " Description 
of a new Chameleon of the genus Rhampholeon from Mashona- 
land " ; " Description of a new Lizard and a new Snake from 
Australia " ; " Description of a new Snake of the genus 
Glauconia from Somaliland " ; "On a new Chameleon from 
Mount Ruwenzori " ; " Descriptions of two new Indian Frogs," 
by G. A. Boulenger. 

Fishes. — " Fourth Contribution to the Ichthyology of 
Lake Tanganyika"; "On some Fishes from the Kwango 
River" ; "Descriptions of new Fishes discovered by Mr. Degen 
in Lake Victoria" ; " On a Collection of Fishes from Galla- 
land " ; "Description of a new Clarias from Uganda"; 
" Description of a new Mormyrid Fish from South Cameroon " ; 
" On some West African Species of Barhus " ; " Description 
of a new Barhus from Uganda"; "On a second species 
of Mochocus" ; "Description of a new Silurid Fish of the 
genus Boumea from Angola"; "On the presence of two 
species of Anahas in the White Nile " ; by G. A. Boulenger. 

" Biologia Centrali- Americana, Pisces (part) " ; "A Classi- 
fication of the Selachian Fishes " ; " On the Fresh-v/ater Fishes 
of the Island of Trinidad " ; "A Revision of the Fishes of the 
family Galaxiidss " ; " Descriptions of new or little known 
Fishes from the Coast of Natal " ; " Two new Cyprinoid 
Fishes from the Helmund Basin " ; " The Vendaces of Loch- 
maben and of Derwentwater and Bassenthwaite Lakes, 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 119 

Coregonus vande sius a,nd Coregonus gracilior" ; "Descrip- 
tions of two new Cyprinid Fishes from Yunnan Fu, 
collected by Mr. John Graham " ; ''A Revision of the South- 
American Cichlid Genera Retroculus, Geophagus, Hetero- 
gramma, and Biotoecus " ; " Description of a new Cyprinodont 
Fish of the genus Jenynsia from Argentina " ; "A Revision 
of the South-American Cichlid Genera Cichla, Chcetohranchus, 
and Chcetohranchopsis, with notes on the Genera of American 
Cichlidse " ; '' Descriptions of five new Fishes from Sarawak, 
collected by Dr. C Hose " ; " Notes on some Loricariid Fishes, 
with descriptions of two new species" ; "A Collection of Fishes 
from the King River, Western Australia"; ''Descriptions of 
some new Sharks in the British Museum Collection," by 
C Tate Regan. 

Mollusca. — " On South African Marine Mollusca, with 
descriptions of new species" ; "Natural History notes from 
R.I.M.S. ' Investigator,' Series III., No. 10. On Mollusca from 
the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea " ; " Zoological results 
of the Third Tanganyika Expedition, conducted by Dr. W. A. 
Ounnington, 1904-5. Report on the Mollusca" ; "Note on 
the sub-genus Malluvium, Melvill " ; " Notes on some species 
of Mitridm, with the description of M. brettinghami, n. sp.," 
by E. A. Smith. 

Insecta. — '' On three remarkable new Melolonthid Cole- 
optera from Sumatra and Borneo in the British Museum " ; 
" On Lamellicorn Coleoptera from Portuguese West Africa, 
with descriptions of new species," by G. J. Arrow. 

" On some Longicorn Coleoptera from Selangor and Perak," 
by C. J. Gahan. 

"On some Blood- sucking and other Diptera from the 
Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, collected during the year 1905, with 
descriptions of new species " ; "An Insect Enemy of the 
Disseminator of Human Tick-Fever in Angola " ; " Horse-flies 
{Tahanidce) and Disease"; "Synonymic Notes on Musca 
7nar(/incdis, Wied., and the genus Pycnosoma, Br. and von 
Berg," by E. E. Austen. 

" The Moths of the Tibet Expedition " ; '' Moths of India, 
Supplementary Papers"; "New Thyrididoe sund Fyralidoe 
in the British Museum," by G. F. Hampson. 

" New Species of Braconidce and Ghalcididue from North 
Queensland, bred by F. P. Dodd," by Col. Charles T. Bingham. 

" RhynchotaJ Notes, xxxviii. to xL " ; " Descriptions 
of New Species of Australian Cicadidae" ; "Descriptions of 
New Species of Fijian Cicadidoe " ; " Some undescribed 
Gicadidoe'" ; "Undescribed Genera and Species of South 
African Rhynchota," by W. L. Distant. 

Crustacea. — "Notes on some genera of the Crustacean 
family Hippolytidse"; "The Cumacea of the Puritan Expedi- 
tion " ; " Report on the Macrurous Crustacea of the third 
Tanganyika Expedition " ; " Note on a Lobster with sym- 
metrical claws," by W. T. Caiman. 



120 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



The following paper, among others, is largely based on 
material in the Museum Collection : — " On the occurrence of 
the genus Acanthephyra off the West Coast of Ireland," by- 
Stanley W. Kemp, B.A. 

Arachnida. — The following papers are largely based on 
material belonging to the Museum : — 

" Notes sur les Ixodides — iv. ; Note sur Si^elcGOvhynchus 
proecui'sor, Nn.," by Professor Neumann. 

"The Danish Expedition to Siam, 1899-1900, III., 
Chelunethi," by Herr C. J. With. 

Frototrachata. — Professor Bouvier has published a second 
portion of his monograph on this group {see Annual Report, 
190G, page 119). 

Vermes. — The following papers are based on specimens in 
the collection : — 

" On the Worms of the Family Gordiidse from Corea," by 
Dr. von Linstow. 

"Zwei neue Landplanarien {Geoj^lana rosenhergi, n. sp., 
und Bipalium n'^tunense, n. sp.)." by Adolf Meixner. 

Porifera. — " Zoological Results of the Third Tanganyika 
Expedition conducted by Dr. W. A. Cunnington, 1904-1905. 
Report on the Porifera, with Notes on Species from the Nile 
and Zambesi," by R. Kirkpatrick. 



V. — Acquisitions. 





Donations. 


Purchases. 


Exchanges. 


Total. 


Mammalia {Sestioated ' - - 


3,059 


455 
3 


5 


3,519 

17 


Ruwenzori Collection - 


1,528 


— 


— 


) 


Aves < Gerrit Miller Collection 





4.000 





i 9,659 


Other sources 


2,612 


1,516 


3 


j 


Eeptilia - - - - 


239 


599 


185 


1,023 


Batrachia - - - - 


125 


344 


141 


610 


Pisces 


945 


785 


39 


1,769 


Mollrsoa i Blanford Collection 
MollLsca j Q^j^g^ g^^^^^g , 


2.000 
1,800 


558 


78 


1 4,436 


Arachnida - - - . 


811 


2,598 


2 


3.411 


Myriopoda - - - - 


111 


258 


— 


369 


T^o.^to/Sliarp Collection - 
^^^^^^nother sources - - 


36,434 


50,000 
631 


742 


1 87,807 


Crustacea - - - . 


1,027 


132 


164 


1,323 


Echinoderma 


18 








18 


Vermes - - . . 


74 


1 


— 


75 


Brachiopoda - - . - 


6 


— 


— 


6 


Anthozoa - - - - 


534 


_ 


— 


534 


Polyzoa - - ' ' - 


25 


— 


— 


25 


Hydrozoa - - . - 


4 


— 


— 


4 


Porifera - - - , - 


168 


2 


183 


353 


Protozoa - - -' - 


15 


— 


— 


15 


Totals - 


51,549 


61,882 


1,542 


114,973 



DEPAKTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 121 

Mammalia. — The accessions number three thousand five 
hundred and thirty-six, the highest number previously 
recorded having been 2,623 in 1903. 

Of these the following are the most noteworthy : — 

Thirty-five mammals from Biarritz ; presented by J. F. 
Davison, Esq. 

A mounted Chamois {Rwpica'pra tragus) from the 
Carpathians ; presented by St. George Littledale, Esq. 

Eight mammals from the Shetland and Orkney Islands ; 
presented by N. B. Kinnear, Esq. 

Thirty- seven bats from various localities, including four 
typical specimens ; presented by the Marquis G. Doria. 

Fifteen mammals collected by the Seistan Boundary 
Commission ; presented by the Calcutta Museum. 

Five hundred and sixty-five mammals from Japan and 
Korea, collected by Mr. M. P. Anderson ; presented by the 
Duke of Bedford, k.g. 

Twenty-three mammals from. Burma ; presented by Capt. 
H. H. Harington. 

Sixteen mammals from Burma, including the type of 
Sciurus m^earsi ; presented by Capt. S. A. Mears. 

Fifty one mammals from Ladak ; presented by Col. 
A. E. Ward. 

Forty-four mammals, including the types of Coilops 
rohinsoni, Sciurus tahan, and Funam,hulus rujigenis, 
collected during the Expedition to Pahang by H, C, 
Robinson, Esq. ; pui'chased. 

Nine mammals from Bangkok ; presented by T. H. Lyle 
Esq. 

Twenty-one mammals from British New Guinea ; presented 
by C. A. W. Monckton, Esq. 

Fifty-two mammals from Japan ; presented by R. Gordon- 
Smith, Esq. 

Forty-three mammals from Annam, collected by Dr. J. 
Vassal ; purchased. 

Sixteen mammals from Foochow and Chinkiang, Lower 
Yangtse ; presented by J. D. La Touche, Esq. 

Five mammals from Fort Hall, British' East Africa ; 
presented by S. L. Hinde, Esq. 

Twenty-nine mammals from Soraaliland, iucluding the 
type of Mus hrockm^ani ; presented by R. E. Drake- 
Brockman, Es.q. 

Four hundred and seventeen mammals collected in the 
Transvaal and Portuguese S.E. Africa, by Mr. C. H. B. 
Grant, including the types of several new species ; presented 
by C D. Rudd, Esq. 

Six mammals from N.E. Transvaal; presented by Major 
J. Stevenson Hamilton. 



122, ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH JHUSEUM. 

A mounted pig (Fotamochoerus porcus) from the 
Cameroons ; presented by Rowland Ward, Esq. 

Five mammals from the Ituri Forest, East Congo Free 
State, including the types of Colohus palliatus cottoni, 
Mellivora cottoni, and Dorcatherium aquaticum coitoni ; 
presented by Major P. H. G. Powell-Cotton. 

Thirty-two mammals from Zanzibar Island, including the 
type of Sciiirus palliatus lastii ; presented by J. T. Last, 
Esq. 

One hundred and eighty-six mammals, including twenty 
types, collected during the expedition to Mount Ruwenzori ; 
presented by the Ruwenzori Exploration Committee ; and 
one hundred and thirty-four mammals collected during the 
same expedition ; purchased. 

Thirty-one mammals, including the types of Surdisorex 
norm and Mylomys cuninghamei, collected near Nyeri, 
British East Africa ; presented by Mrs. Holms-Tarn. 

Sixteen mammals from Suakin and the Sudan ; presented 
by A. L. Butler, Esq. 

Fifteen mammals from S.E. Mashonaland ; presented by 
C. F. M. Swynnerton, Esq. 

Sixty-eight mammals collected at various localities in 
N.E. Africa by Mr. Zaphiro, including the types of P Latymops 
r)iacmillani, Helogale macmillani, Ictonyx capensis shoce, 
Tatera harringtoni, Otortiys iypus fortior, Arvicanthis rex, 
and Lophurowiys zaphiri ; presented by W. N. McMillan, 
Esq. 

A mounted male African elephant from near Fort 
Manning, Northern Rhodesia;' purchased. 

Seven mammals from Argentina ; presented by Turner 
Henderson, Esq. 

Nineteen mammals from Bahia and the Comoro Islands, 
collected during the voyage of the Valhalla ; presented by 
the Earl of Crawford. 

One hundred and twenty-eight mammals, including types 
of Nyctinormis plicatus colonicus, Mus forresti, Phascogale 
mimulus, P. ingrami, and Sminthopsis stalkeri, collected 
by Mr. W. Stalker at Alexandria, Northern Territory of 
S. Australia ; presented by Sir Wm. Ingram, Bart., and the 
Hon. John Forrest. ; 

Three hundred and eighty-four mammals from S.W. 
Australia, including the types of Pipistrellus regulus, 
Scoteinus balstoni, Mus shortridgei, Dasyurus geoffroyi 
fortis, and Tachyglossus aculeatus ineptus, and thirty-four 
specimens from Sharks Bay, North-West Australia, collected 
by Mr. G. C. Shortridge ; presented by W. E. Balston, Esq. 

Three hundred and sixty-one mammals from Trebizond, 
Asia Minor, including the types of Talpa cwca levantis, 
Crocidura leucodon lasius, C. russula monacha, Microtus 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 123 

roherti, M. majori and Evotomys ponticus ; ninety-three from 
the Pyrenees, and fifty-five from Switzerland, S. Italy, and 
Sicily, collected by Mr. A. Robert ; also sixty-one mammals 
from British Guiana, collected by Mr. S. B. Warren ; and 
twenty-three from Montevideo and La Plata, collected by the 
donor; presented by Oldfield Thomas, Esq. 

ylves.— The total number of accessions was nine thousand 
six hundred and fifty-nine, the most noteworthy being the 
following : — 

One hundred and nineteen specimens from Japan and 
Corea, collected by Mr. M. P. Anderson ; presented by His 
Grace the Duke of Bedford, K.G. 

Five hundred specimens collected by Mr. M. J. Nicoll 
during the voyage of the R.Y.S. "Valhalla" ; presented by 
the Earl of Crawford, K.T., F.R.S. 

Five hundred and twenty-six birds from Western Yun- 
nan ; collected and presented by Colonel G. Rippon. 

One hundred and eight birds from Upper Burma ; pre- 
sented by Capt. H. H. Harington. 

Three hundred and sixty-five birds from Western Aus- 
tralia, collected by Mr. Shortridge ; presented by W. E. 
Balston, Esq. 

One hundred and sixty- eight birds from Western Vir- 
ginia ; presented by H. T. Burls, Esq. 

Seventy-one birds from Uganda ; presented by Dr. Cuth- 
bert Christy. 

Two hundred and five specimens from Lower Nigeria, 
collected by Robin Kemp, Esq.; purchased. 

Twenty-one specimens from the River Gambia ; presented 
by Dr. E. JS". Hopkinson. 

Nineteen specimens from Sarawak ; presented by R. Shel- 
ford, Esq. 

The type of a new Hill-Partridge, Arhoricola batemani ; 
presented by Eugene W. Oates, Esq. 

A specimen of the Australian Cassowary (Casuarius 
australis), and ten Birds of Paradise (ScJdegelia calva) ; 
presented by Sir William Ingram, Bart. 

Three Prince of Wales' Pheasants (Pkasianus princi- 
palis), from the Hari River ; presented by Colonel P. Moles- 
worth Sykes, H.B.M. Consul-General for Khorasan. 

Nine types of new species from Equatorial Africa ; pre- 
sented by F. J. Jackson, Esq., C.B., c.m.g. 

Two eggs of the Standard-winged Nightjar (Macrodipteryx 
Tnacrodipterus) ; presented by J. H. J. Farquhar, Esq. 

Seven specimens of birds, forty nests and eggs, from 
Setubal, Portugpd ; presented by Don Luiz Gonzaga do 
Nascimento. 



124) ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Three hundred and ninety-four birds from Gunong 
Tahan, Malay Peninsula ; presented by the Selangor State 
Museum. 

Twenty-seven birds from the River Niger ; presented by 
Churchill Bryant, Esq. 

Four Wild Turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo), from Durango, 
Mexico ; presented by J. H. Fleming, Esq. 

A valuable collection of North American birds formed by 
lilr. Gerrit Miller, and consisting of four thousand skins, 
including the Maynard collection of Bahama birds, with 
several types ; purchased. 

Mr. C. D. Rudd has continued his donations of birds from 
South Africa and Mozambique, whence large series have 
been sent by Mr. Claude Grant, who is collecting for 
Mr. Rudd. 

Ninety-one birds from the Solomon Islands, collected by 
A. S. Meek ; purchased. 

Twenty-seven nests of birds from the Andaman Islands ; 
presented by B. B. Osmaston, Esq. 

Fifteen birds, mostly Francolins, from British East Africa ; 
presented by Colonel W. H. Broun, 

One thousand five hundred and twenty-eight specimens 
of birds from the Ruwenzori Range and adjacent parts of 
Equatorial Africa ; presented by the subscribers to the 
Ruwenzori Expedition. 

One hundred and fifty birds from Somaliland, collected 
by Mr. G. W. Bury ; purchased. 

Three hundred and thirty -one birds from Benguella, 
collected by Dr. W. J. Ansorge; purchased. 

Seventy-nine birds from Annam, collected by Dr. J. J. 
"Vassal; purchased. 

Two hundred and sixty-two birds from the Tian Shan 
Mountains, collected by Mr. Kutzenko ; purchased. 

One hundred and fifteen birds from Uganda, collected by 
Mr. E Degen ; purchased. 

Two hundred and twelve birds from Camaroons, collected 
by Mr. G. L. Bates ; purchased. 

Reptilia. — The accessions number one thousand and 
twenty-three, two hundred and thirty-nine presented, five 
hundred and ninety-nine purchased, and one hundred and 
eighty-five received in exchange. The following are the more 
important : — 

Eighty Reptiles from near Madrid ; purchased. 

Thirty-three Reptiles from India, including co-types of 
Gymnodactylus consohrinoidcs, Hemidactylus subtri- 
edroides,Teratolepisscahrice2^s,iindJa2Jaluraandersoniana; 
received from the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 



DEPA.RTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 125 

The types of a new Tortoise (Testudo travancoi'ica) from 
Travancore ; received from the Trevandrum Museum. 

Twenty-seven Reptiles from Selangor, including the types 
of three new species (Draco cyanolceinus, Lygosoma co2)hias, 
and Gonyocephalus robinsonii) ; received from the Selangor 
State Museum. 

A rare Lizard (Lanthanotws borneensis), previously 
unrepresented in the Museum, from Sarawak ; purchased. 

Forty-seven Reptiles from the Loo Choo Islands ; 
purchased. 

Nine Reptiles from Yunnan ; collected by Mr. J. Graham, 
including the types of a new Tortoise {Gyolemi/s yunnan- 
ensis) ; purchased. 

Fourteen Reptiles from the Atlas of Morocco, collected by 
Herr Riggenbach ; purchased. 

Twenty-one Reptiles from Tunisia ; presented by 
Monsieur Henri Gadeau de Kerville. 

Twenty-five Reptiles from Cameroon, collected by Mr. 
G. L. Bates ; purchased. 

Eighty-one Reptiles from West Africa, collected by the 
late Signor L. Fea, including several types ; received from 
the Genoa Museum. 

Eighty Reptiles from Benguella, collected by Dr. W. J. 
Ansorge ; purchased. 

A rare Snake, new to the collection, Boulengerinai 
stitrmfii, from Kasawa, on Lake Tanganyika, collected by 
Dr. W. A. Cunnington. 

Nineteen Reptiles from Uganda, collected by Mr. E. Degen, 
including the types of two new species {Leptodira degeni 
and Algiroides africanus) ; purchased. 

Twenty-six Reptiles from Mount Ruwenzori, collected by 
R. B. Woosnam, Esq., including the type of a new Snake 
(^Aiheris woosnami) ; presented by the subscribers to the 
Ruwenzori Expedition Fund. 

Twenty Reptiles from Rhodesia and Portuguese East 
Africa, collected by S. A. Neave, Esq. ; presented by the 
British South Africa Company. 

The type of a new Chameleon (Rhampholeon marshalli), 
from the Chirinda Forest, Mashonaland; presented by G. A. K. 
Marshall, Esq. 

The type of a new Tortoise {Homopus boulengeri), from 
Cape Colony ; presented by Dr. J. E. Duerden. 

A Lizard {Xantusia riversiania), from California ; new 
to the collection ; received from the Museum of Zoology, 
Cambridge. 



126 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

One hundred and sixteen Reptiles from Mexico, collected 
by Dr. H. Gadow, including the types of four new species 
(Anolis gadovii, A. liogaster, Sceloporus gadovice, and 
Leptodira guilleni) ; purchased. 

Thirty-three Lizards of the genus Cnemidophorus from 
Mexico ; received from the Field Museum of Natural History, 
Chicago. 

Ninety-six Lizards of the genus Cnemidophorus from 
Mexico, collected by Dr. H. Gadow ; purchased. This and 
the series mentioned above formed the basis of Dr. Gadow's 
interesting study on the variation in this group. 

Thirteen Reptiles from Argentina, collected by Herr 
Steinbach : purchased. 

Thirty-one Reptiles from Northern Australia, collected by 
Mr, W. Stalker, including the types of a new Snake [Denisonia 
forresti) and a new Lizard {Varanus ingrami) ; presented by 
Sir William Ingram, Bart., and the Right Hon. John Forrest. 

Ten Reptiles from Western Australia, collected by Mr. 
G. S. Shortridge ; presented by W. E. Ralston, Esq. 

Batrachia. — The accessions number six hundred and ten, 
one hundred and twent^^-five presented, three hundred and 
forty-four purchased, and one hundred and forty-one 
received in exchange. The more important are : — 

Fifty-three Batrachians from near Madrid ; purchased. 

Ten Batrachians from India, including co-types of Ixalus 
annandalii and Rhacophorus taeniatus ; received from the 
Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Twenty-three Batrachians from Yunnan, collected by Mr. 
J. Graham, including examples of the recently discovered 
Bombinator maxivius ; purchased. 

Thirty-three Batrachians from Selangor, including the 
type of a new Frog {Ixalus brevipes) ; received from the 
"Selangor State Museum. 

Ninety-six Batrachians from West Africa, collected by 
the late Signor L. Fea, including several types ; received 
from the Genoa Museum. 

Ninety-five Batrachians from Cameroon, collected by Mr. 
G. L. Bates, including the types of five new species (Rana 
goliath, Arthroleptis taeniatus, A. batesii, A. cornutus, and 
Rappia pleurotaenia) ; purchased. 

Forty-five Batrachians from Benguella, collected by 
Dr. W. J. Ansorge ; purchased. 

Forty-eight Batrachians from LTganda, collected by Mr. 
E. Degen, including the type of a new Toad {Bufo vittatus) ; 
purchased. 

Twenty-six Batrachians from Uganda, including the types 
of a new Frog (Hylamhates auhito-albus) ; presented by 
Dr. C. Christy. 



DEPAKTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 127 

One of the types of a Toad (Nectophryne tornieri) from 
German East Africa ; received from the Basle Museum. 

Eighteen Batrachians from Zululand and Natal ; pre- 
sented by Dr. E. Warren. 

Forty-six Batrachians from Mexico, collected by Dr. H. 
Gadow ; purchased. 

Twenty-two Batrachians from Argentina, collected by 
Herr Steinbach ; purchased. 

Pisces. — The accessions number one thousand seven 
hundred and sixty-nine, nine hundred and forty-five pre- 
sented, seven hundred and eigthy-five purchased, and thirty- 
nine received in exchange. The more important are : — 

A series of specimens illustrating the transition of the 
larval Eel (Leptocephalus hrevirostris) into the Common 
Eel {Anguilla vulgaris) ; presented by Dr. C. G. J, Petersen. 

Twelve skeletons of Selachians in spirit, prepared by 
Herr V. Fritsch ; purchased. 

Two Vendace {Coregonus gracilior), from Derwent water 
and Bassenthwaite ; presented by S. Venour, Esq. 

A large Gwyniad {Coregonus clupeoides), from Bala Lake ; 
presented by Sir Watkin Wynn, Bart. 

A large stuffed Angler {Lophius piscatorius), from 
Norfolk ; presented by H. Connop, Esq. 

A large Chub {Leuciscus cephalus), from the Hampshire 
Avon ; presented by E. J. Walker, Esq. 

Eighteen Fishes from Lough Erne, i ncluding a Pollan 
(Coregonus pollan) and two hybrid Bream (Ahramis hrama 
X Leuciscus erythrop>hthalvius) ; presented by Major H. 
Trevelyan. 

Two Pollan (Coregonus pollan), from Lough Bee ; 
presented by E. W. L. Holt, Esq. 

A ripe male Eel (Anguilla vulgaris), from Ireland ; 
presented by Mr. James Howell. 

Thirty-five Fishes of the genus Lepidogaster, from the 
coasts of France, including examples of two species new to 
the Museum ; received from Prof. F. Guitel. 

A rare Fish (Zeus conchifer) from the Atlantic ; presented 
by Dr. Y. H. Mills. 

A second specimen of Zeus conchifer from the Atlantic ; 
presented by the Director of Harrod's Stores. 

Two Angel Fishes (Squatina aculeata) from the Mediter- 
ranean ; purchased. 

One of the types of Gohius alcocki, from Bengal ; received 
from the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Nine Fishes, including examples of five species new to the 
collection, from Travancore; received from the Trevandrum 
Museum. 



128 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Forty Fishes from Sarawak, collected by Dr. C. Hose, 
including the types of two new species (Cosmochilus falcifer 
and Liocassis hosii) ; purchased. 

Thirty Fishes from Algeria ; presented by Lord 
Walsingham. 

Seventy-three Fishes, from Cameroon, collected by Mr. 
G. L. Bates, including the type of a new species {Marcusenius 
batesii) ; purchased. 

The type of a new Catfish (Doumxa angolensis), from 
Benguella ; presented by Dr. F. Creighton Wellman. 

Four hundred and forty-eight Fishes from Lake Victoria, 
forming part of a very valuable collection made by Mr. E. 
Degen, and including the types of a large number of new 
species, as well as examples of several species previously 
described but unrepresented in the Museum ; purchased. 

The types of a new Barbel {Barhus portali], from near 
Mount Ruwenzori, collected by R. B. Woosnam, Esq. ; pre- 
sented by the subscribers to the Ruwenzori Expedition Fund. 

Fourteen Fishes from British E. Africa ; presented by 
S. L. Hinde, Esq. 

Two hundred and ten Fishes from Lakes Tanganyika, 
Nyassa, Albert and Albert Edward, collected by J. E. S. 
Moore, Esq., including the types of several new species ; 
presented by the Tanganyika Exploration Committee. 

Two hundred and seventy-eight Fishes from Lake 
Tanganyika, collected by Dr. Cunnington, including the types 
of several new species ; presented by the Tanganyika 
Exploration Committee. 

Fourteen Fishes from Rhodesia and Portuguese E. Africa, 
collected by S. A. Neave, Esq., including the types of a 
new species {Barilius neavii) ; presented by the British 
S. Africa Co. 

Two Trout from Lough Arrow, Ireland ; presented by 
Mr. J. Gunning. 

Ninety-seven Fishes from Zululand and Natal, including 
the types of six new species (Squatina africana, Ophichthys 
iinicolor, Apogon warreni, PristipoiYia taeniophoruTui, 
Blennius punctifer, and Salarias kosiensis) ; presented by 
Dr. E. V/arren. 

Twenty-five Fishes from Durban, Natal ; presented by 
the Rev. N. Abraham. 

Twelve Fishes from various localities, including a large 
Oar-fish (Regalecus glesne) from the Cape of Good Hope ; 
presented by the Earl of Crawford. 

The skeleton of a large Tarpon ( Megalops thrissoides), 
from Florida ; presented by C. B. C. Storey, Esq. 

One hundred and sixty-three Fishes from Mexico, collected 
by Dr. H. Gadow, including the types of two new species 
{Cichlosoma gadovii andSicydiuni punctatum) ; purchased. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. i29 

One hundred and nine fresh-water Fishes from Trinidad, 
including the types of three new species (Tetragonopterus 
guppyi, Auchenipterus guppyi, and A. pasece) ; collected 
and presented by L. Guppy, Esq., jun. 

Forty-seven Fishes from Venezuela and the West Indies ; 
presented by Laura, Countess of Wilton. 

Thirty-seven Fishes from Argentina, collected by Herr 
Steinbach, including the types of two new species {Loricaria 
steinhachi and Jenynsla tnaculata) ; purchased. 

Twenty-two Fishes from the King River, Western 
Australia, including the types of a new species {Nanna- 
therina balstoni), collected by Mr. G. C. Shortridge ; 
presented by W. E. Balston, Esq. 

Eighty-nine Fishes from the National Antarctic Expedi- 
tion of the " Discovery," including the types of four new 
species {Notothenia //odgsoni, N. scotti, Champsocephalus 
tnacropterus, and Bathydraco macrolepis). 

Seven Fishes from the Swedish Antarctic Expedition, 
including examples of Champsocephalus gunnsri and 
Notothenia brevipes, new to the collection ; presented by 
Dr. E. Lonnberg. 

Thirty-six stuffed Fishes from various localities ; presented 
by the Hon. W. Rothschild. 

Mollusca. — The most important acquisition during the 
year was the collection of land and fresh-water shells (chiefly 
Indian), bequeathed by the late Dr. W. T. Blanford, C.I.E., 
F.R-S. The actual number of specimens to be retained has 
not yet been ascertained, but it is estimated at about 2,000. 
The collection contains the types of a considerable number 
of species described by Dr. Blanford many years ago, and 
numerous other species which were to have been published in 
the " Fauna of India," a work upon which he was engaged 
at the time of his death. 

Among the other additions, numbering two thousand four 
hundred and thirty-six specimens, the following are the most 
important series :— 

Three hundred and forty-eight marine shells mostly from 
Singapore, collected by the late Surgeon-Colonel S. Archer ; 
presented by Miss Archer. 

One hundred and sixty-five deep-sea Mollusca, dredged by 
the R.I. M.S. *' Investigator " in the Bay of Bengal and the 
Arabian Sea, including the co-types of many species recently 
described ; presented by the Indian Museum, Calcutta. 

Fifty-six marine shells from the Gulf of Oman, the Persian 
Gulf, and Ceylon, including the tj^pes of eight species of 
C y do str ema a.nd the type of Nassa tindalli ; presented by 
J. C. Melvill, Esq. 

One hundred and fifty-two land, fresh-water, and marine 
shells from South Africa, Hong Kong, and other localities, 
10.5. T 



130 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

including the types of twenty-three new species ; presented 
by J. H, Ponsonby, Esq. 

Eighty-four marine shells from the Gulf of Oman and the 
Persian Gulf, including the types of twenty-nine new species 
described by J. C. Melvill ; purchased. 

Forty-one land and fresh-water shells from Sumatra, 
including the types of nine new species ; presented by Rev. 
R. Ashington Bullen. 

Thirty-two specimens of Glessula from India, including 
the types of nine new species described and presented by 
Colonel R. H. Beddome. 

One hundred and forty-one shells from Lake Tanganyika 
and the Victoria Nyanza ; presented by the Tanganyika 
Exploring Expedition Committee. 

Two hundred and twenty-two land and marine shells from 
v^arious localities, including ten types and many other species 
new to the collection ; purchased. 

Thirteen marine shells from Victoria, &c., including an 
example of the rare Valuta roadnightoe ; purchased. 

One hundred and fifteen land Mollusca from the Anda- 
man Islands, collected and presented by G. Rogers, Esq. 

Crustacea. — The additions number one thousand three 
hundred and twenty-three, of which the following are the 
most important : — 

Thirty-three parasitic Copepoda, mostly co-types of 
recently described species ; received in exchange from the 
U.S. National Museum, Washington. 

One hundred and forty-four prawns from the lakes of 
Central Africa, including types of ten new species ; presented 
by the Tanganyika Exploration Committee. 

Twelve Crayfish from Roumania ; purchased. 

Fifteen specimens of Mysis relicta and two Crayfish from 
Ireland ; presented by W. F. de Vismes Kane, Esq. 

Thirty-four Crayfish from Hungary ; presented by Prof. 
Mehely. 

Twenty-three Cirripedia, including co-types of five recently 
described species ; received in exchange from the Indian 
Museum, Calcutta. 

One hundred and ninety Crustacea from New Britain and 
elsewhere, including the types of sixteen species ; presented 
by Dr. A. Willey. 

Four abnormal specimens of the common Lobster ; pre- 
sented by the Directors of Harrod's Stores, Limited. 

One River-Crab from the Victoria Falls ] presented by 
C. F. Rousselet, Esq. 

Three Prawns from Algiers ; presented by R. Gurney, 
Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 131 

. Two River- Grabs from Algiers; presented by H. M. 
Wallis, Esq. 

Four fresh-water Crustacea from Christmas Island ; pre- 
sented by Dr. R. Hanitsch, Singapore. 

Six River-Crabs from Algiers; presented by Lord 
Walsingham. 

Four River-Crabs from the Transvaal ; presented by 
C. D. Rudd, Esq. 

Two Crayfish from Montenegro ; presented by Baron 
Kuhn. 

One River-Crab from British East Africa ; presented by 
O. W. Hoblay, Esq. 

Claws of a large Lobster ; presented by Rowland Ward, 
Limited. 

Four Crustacea from the Nile ; presented by R. Loat, 
Esq. 

Ten Crustacea from the Nile ; presented by Capt. S. S. 
Flower, 

Twenty terrestrial Isopoda from Corsica ; purchased. 

Fifteen Crustacea from the West Indies ; purchased. 

Nine River-Crabs from Ruwenzori ; presented by the 
subscribers to the Ruwenzori Expedition. 

Twenty Crustacea from the voyage of the "Valhalla"; 
presented by the Earl of Crawford. 

Thirty-two Decapoda and Schizopoda, including co-types 
of three recently described species ; presented by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture for Ireland. 

One hundred and twenty-nine Cumacea from the Medi- 
terranean, including types of five new species ; presented by 
Dr. Anton Dohrn. 

Sixty-seven preparations of British Crustacea, including 
series of moulted shells showing the rate of growth in 
Carcinus racenas and Eupagurus bernhardus ; presented by 
H. J. Waddington, Esq. 

Ten Crayfish and one River-Prawn from Mexico ; pre- 
sented by Dr. A. Duges. 

Five Crayfish from Winchester ; presented by the Rev. 
G. M. A. Hewitt. 

Thirty specim-ens of RhizoceiDhala and their hosts, illus- 
trating the modifications produced in the latter by the 
presence of the parasites ; presented by Geoff'rey Smith, Esq., 

B.A. 

Five River-Crabs from Italy ; received in exchange from. 
Prof. Vinciguerra. 

Eighty-seven Crustacea from Scotland ; presented by 
Dr. W. T. Caiman. 

I 2 



132 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Twenty-one Schizopoda, Stomatopoda, and Phyllocarida, 
from Ceylon, including types of two new species ; presented 
by Prof. W. A. Herdman, f.r.s. 

Sixteen Crustacea from Australia ; presented by F. E, 
Grant, Esq. 

One hundred and three Crayfish from North America ; 
received in exchange from the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh^ 
U.S.A. 

Ten Prawns from Australia and one Crayfish from 
Leicester ; presented by J. Roberts, Esq. 

Fifteen deep-sea Crustacea from the North Atlantic; 
presented by Dr. R. N. Wolfenden. 

Six specimens of a new British Woodlouse (Trichoniscus 
pusillus) ; presented by R. S. Bagnall, Esq. 

Arachnida. — The accessions number three thousand four 
hundred and eleven, of which the following are most worthy 
of notice : — 

One thousand five hundred Spiders from Paraguay, 
collected by Dr. Bohls ; purchased. 

Four hundred and twelve Spiders and Ticks from Uganda, 
including the types of two new species of Ticks, collected by 
E. Degen ; pui'chased. 

Three hundred and fifty Arachnida from the Cameroons, 
W. Africa, collected by G. L. Bates ; purchased. 

One hundred and sixty -four Spiders from Ceylon ; pre- 
ented by Dr. A. Willey. 

Two hundred Arachnida from Somaliland, collected by 
G. W. Bury ; purchased. 

One hundred and twenty Ticks from Egypt; presented 
by Professor Bitter. 

One hundred and ten Spiders and Mites from the Channel 
Islands ; presented by A. S. Hirst, Esq. 

Fifty Cattle- ticks { Rhipicephalus annulatus, var. aus- 
tralis), from Queensland, Australia ; various stages from ova 
to adult, taken on cattle infected with Texas fever ; presented 
by the New South Wales Health Department. 

Eleven Ticks from the Congo Free State, including the 
types of two new species ; presented by Dr. A. Yale Massey. 

Myriopoda. — The accessions number three hundred and 
sixty -nine, of which the following are noteworthy : — 

One hundred and seventy-four European Myriopoda, 
including the co-types of thirty-four forms described by 
Professor K. Verhoetf ; purchased. 

Thirty-seven Myriopoda from Ceylon; presented by 
Dr. A Willoy. 

Forty-eight Myriopoda from Somaliland, collected by 
G. W. Bury ; purchased. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 133 

Forty-five Myriopoda f rom the Channel Islands; presented 
by A. S. Hirst, Esq. 

Insecta. — The accessions for the year amounted to eighty- 
seven thousand eight hundred and seven, distributed in the 
following manner : — 

Coleoptera - - - - 58,135 

Lepidoptera- - - - - - 21,230 

Rhynchota 1,169 

Diptera 1,664 

Hymenoptera ------ 3,972 

Orthoptera - ^ . - - - - 997 

Neuroptera ------- 384 

AnopJura and Mallophaga - - - - 256 

Total - - - 87,807 

The most important of these are the following : — 

(From various Localities.) 

The second portion of Dr. D. Sharp's collection of 

Coleoptera, amounting to about 50,000 specimens, and in- 

€luding the Clavicornia, Palpicornia, Geodephaga, Lamelli- 

cornia, Longicornia, Heteromera, Phytophaga, fee. ; purchased. 

Three tliousand nine hundred and thirty-six Palsearctic 
Lycsenidse, five hundred and ninety-two Palfearctic Pyralidse, 
and twenty-nine Indian and Paljearctic Noctuidse and Zjgse- 
nidae, chiefly types ; presented by H. J. Elwes, Esq., f.r.s. 

One thousand one hundred and seventy-three Lepidoptera, 
sixty-one Orthoptera, one hundred and two Diptera, thirty- 
one Hymenoptera, one hundred and ten Rhynchota, and 
twenty-five Coleoptera ; presentedby Philip de la Garde, Esq. 

One hundred and three Hymenoptera, chiefly types ; 
purchased. 

Three hundred and sixty-two Moths, collected by Mr. 
E. G. B. Meade-Waldo on the cruise of the S.Y. "Valhalla"; 
presented by the Earl of Crawford, k.g. 

Two hundred and three Coleoptera, chiefly co-types ; 
received by exchange from the Genoa Civic Museum. 

Six Aspidiotus aurantii from Egypt, and fort}/ -two 
Coccidce from Kew Gardens ; presented by R. Newstead, Esq. 

(From Great Britain and the Palsearctic Region.) 

One Lestes viridis, a rare British Neuropteron ; presented 
by E. R. Speyer, Esq. 

One hundred and three specimens of Acalla cristina, 
including twenty varieties; presented by J. A. Clark, Esq. 

Fifty Diptera, fifty Aphaniptera, thirty specimens of 
Cimex lectularius, and one hundred Mallophaga from Macin, 
near Braila, Roumania ; presented by Dr. Ernest Belzoni, 
H.B.M. Vice- Consul. 



13^4 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Twenty-four Hymenoptera, bred frora pupse taken at 
Bagshot Sands; presented by R. A. Bullen, Esq. 

Three thousand two hundred and ninety-six Lepidoptera,, 
one thousand five hundred and fifty-two Hymenoptera, seven 
hundred and eighty-two Coleoptera, two hundred and fifty- 
three Diptera, eighty-one Orthoptera, forty-six Rhynchota,. 
thirtj^-seven Neuroptera, and twenty Trichoptera from Tibet; 
collected by Captain Herbert J. Walton, i.M.s., and the officers 
of the " Tibet Frontier Commission " ; presented by the 
Government of India. 

One hundred and sixty Butterflies and twenty-four Moths 
from tlie Tyrol ; presented by Sir G. F. Hampson, Bart. 

Twenty- six cards of cases of British Coleophoridce ;. 
presented by H. J. Turner, Esq. 

(From Africa.) 

Five hundred Butterflies and three hundred and seven 
Moths from Uganda ; presented by Prof, E. A, Minchin. 

One hundred and seven Moths, three pupae and fourteen 

. larviB, eighty-nine Neuroptera, five Diptera, twenty-two 

Hymenoptera, twenty-three Orthoptera, two hundred and 

seventy-one Coleoptera, and seventeen lihynchota, from 

Mashonaland ; presented by G. A. K. Marshall, Esq. 

Two hundred and fifty-four Lepidoptera, one hundred and 
fifty Coleoptera, one hundred and ninety-six Hymenoptera, 
five Neuroptera, fifty-three Rhynchota, sixty-five Diptera, 
and fourteen Orthoptera, from East Africa and Transvaal ; 
presented by A. J. Cholmley, Esq. 

One hundred and eighty-six Butterflies from Southern 
Nigeria; presented by Wm. Shield, Esq. 

Seven hundred and eighty-one Lepidoptera, foriy-five 
Hymenoptera, eighteen Rhynchota, sixty-one Diptera, four- 
teen Coleoptera, three Orthoptera, and two Neuroptera, from 
Sierra Leone, Gambia, Gold Coast, Ashanti, and Nigeria ; 
presented by G. C. Dudgeon, Esq. 

Six Butterflies, three hundred and eighteen Moths, ten 
pupse, three Diptera, and three Rhynchota, from Lagos ; 
presented by G. L. Boag, Esq. 

One thousand two hundred and sixty Butterflies, three 
hundred and eighty-seven Moths, one hundred and sixteen 
Orthoptera, eleven Hymenoptera, seven Neuroptera, sixty- 
five Rhynchota, one hundred and twenty-four Coleoptera, 
and one Dipteron from British East Africa, collected 
on the Lake Rudolf Expedition; presented by Sir John 
Harrington. 

One hundred and thirty Butterflies and ten Moths from 
Fernando Po ; presented by the Duke of Bedford, the 
Hon. W. Rothschild, and Mrs. Percy Sladen. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 135 

Two hundred Diptera, three Aphaniptera, and a series 
of Pediculi, from Seychelles Islands ; presented by P. R. 
Dupont, Esq. 

One hundred and eighteen Diptera, twentj^-five Aphanip- 
tera, twenty Hymenoptera, two Rhynchota, two Coleoptera, 
one Macroglossa trocliilioides, one caterpillar, one Mantis, 
and four Neuroptera, from Angola ; presented by Dr. F. C. 
Wellman, 

Two thousand one hundred and forty-seven Coleoptera, 
eight Orthoptera, two Hymenoptera, eleven Rhynchota, and 
one Dipteron, from Table Mountain, Cape of Good Hope ; 
presented by W. Bevins, Esq. 

(Erom the Oriental Region.) 

Sixty-six Coleoptera, eleven Rhynchota, eleven Orthop- 
tera, twenty-four Lepidoptera, eight Diptera, and three 
Hymenoptera, from Cocos Keeling Islands ; presented by 
F. Wood-Jones, Esq. 

Five Butterflies and two hundred and fifty-six Moths 
from Bombay ; presented by Dr. Jayakar. 

One thousand eight hundred and seventy-six Moths from 
New Guinea ; presented by G. H. Kenrick, Esq. 

Two hundred and twenty Butterflies, one hundred and 
thirty-eight Moths, sixteen Rhynchota, seventeen Diptera, 
twenty-six Hymenoptera, and three Coleoptera, from the 
Philippine Islands ; presented by R. C. Macgregor, Esq. 

One hundred and eighty-five Coleoptera, twenty-eight 
Rhynchota, and two Orthoptera from Sanga Sanga, East 
Borneo ; presented by H. D. Jensen, Esq. 

Twenty-six Coleoptera, twelve Hymenoptera, one Dipteron, 
eighteen Orthoptera, two Neuroptera, thirteen Rhynchota, 
and one hundred and twenty-seven Lepidoptera, from 
Singapore ; presented by H. N. Ridley, Esq. 

Forty-three Orthoptera, two hundred and ninety-nine 
Rhynchota, two hundred and forty-nine Hymenoptera, seven 
Neuroptera, three hundred and seventy-five Butterflies, nine 
hundred and ninety-two moths, six hundred and sixty-seven 
Coleoptera, twenty Diptera, and a collection of notes and 
drawings from Assam, chiefly Khasia Hills ; presented by 
Col. W. F. Badgley. 

Two hundred and ten Orthoptera from Ceylon, including 
nearly all the species known to occur there ; presented by 
Dr. A. Willey and E. E. Green, Esq. 

One hundred and ninety-six Coleoptera, twenty-two 
Rhynchota, forty-four Hymenoptera, and two Orthoptera, 
from Darjeeling and Dehra Dun ; one hundred and twelve 
Coleoptera, nineteen Rhynchota, one hundred and seventy- 
five Hymenoptera, and seventeen Orthoptera from Nicobar 



136 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Islands ; and twenty-three Orthopiera, twenty- five Rhyn- 
cliota, six hundred and fifty Hymenopteva, and one hundred 
and fifty-two Coleoptera. from Andaman Islands and Nar- 
condam Island ; presented by Gilbert Rogers, Esq. 

(From America.) 
Nine hundred and forty-one Central American Scolytidce, 
worked out and described by Mr. W. F. Blandford ; and 
two hundred and fourteen Clavicorn Coleoptera, worked 
out and described by Dr. D. Sharp ; presented by F. D. 
Godman, Esq., d.c.l., f.r.s. 

Twenty Butterflies, three hundred and fifty-three Moths 
from Trinidad ; and three Butterflies, two hundred and two 
Moths from Venezuela ; presented by W. T. Kaye, Esq. 

Two hundred and twenty-two Moths, and two Pupse from 
California ; presented by W. D'Urban, Esq. 

Eighty Butterflies, one hundred and forty-two Coleoptera, 
ten Hymenoptera, and three Rhynchota from Tierra del 
Fuego ; presented by Capt. R. Crawshay. 

Echinoderma. — The accessions were remarkably scanty — 
being only eighteen ; and none were of special interest. 

Vermies. — Here again the accessions were only seventy- 
five, but the majority are of great interest, being the 
Chsetognaths of the Siboga and Challenger Voyages, which 
have been determined by Dr. G. Herbert Fowler. 

AntJwzoa. — The accessions were five hundred and thirty- 
four, and consisted mainly of microscopic preparations made 
by Dr. Fowler in the course of his well-known investigations 
into the morphology of Corals, and are obviously of great 
value. 

Porifera. — Of the thiee hundred and fifty-three acqui- 
sitions the most interesting are : — 

A collection of fourteen specimens of fresh-water Sponges 
from the Victoria Nyanza and Lakes Tanganyika and 
Nyasa, collected by Dr. W. A. Cunnington in the course 
of the Third Tanganyika Expedition ; presented by the 
Tanganyika Exploration Committee. 

A very valuable set of collections of Calcareous Sponges 
from various localities, comprising numerous specimens 
described and figured by E. A. Minchin ; also spicule- 
drawings of the above specimens and micro-preparations. 
The total number of specimens and preparations is one 
hundred and forty-eight ; presented by Prof. E. A. Minchin. 

An example of the gigantic "pfahl-nadel " or pile needle 
of Monorhaphis chuni, Schulze, an Hexactinellid Sponge. 

The needle is 41 inches in length, being the longest known. 

It was obtained from 160 fathoms from the channel 
between Dar-es-splam and Zanzibar, and came up entangled 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 



137 



in an Alcyonarian coral growing on a cable. The spicule 
is exhibited in the Hexactinellid Sponge-case in the Coral 
Gallery ; presented by J. T. Last, Esq. 

A collection of pieces of sponges cut from type specimens 
in the Berlin Museum, and sent to the British Museum 
(Nat, Hist.) in exchange for pieces of type specimens in 
the British Museum Collection ; one hundred and eighty- 
three species are represented in all, and constitute a valuable 
index of several collections recently described by German 
naturalists. 

Two immense Horny Sponges, the largest specimens 
known. One {Hippospongia equina) is 3 feet in diameter, 
and in the form of a cart-wheel rim ; the other {Euspongia 
officinalis, var. lamella, or the Elephant's Ear Sponge) is 
in the form of a flattened circular slightly concave disk 
supported on a short central stalk on the under surface ; 
purchased. 



VI. — Visitors and Students. 

The total number of visits paid to the three sections of 
the Department during the year by Students and other 
persons requiring assistance or information amounted to 
10,813, as compared with : — 

11,811 in the year 1905. 
11,824 „ 1904. 



11,627 


1903. 


10,633 


1902. 


12,813 


1901. 


11,923 


1900. 


10,728 


1899. 


10,830 


1898. 


9,708 


1897. 


7,995 


1896. 



E. Ray Lankester, 

Director and Acting Keeper 

of Zoology. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Geology. 

T. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

Mammalia (Galleries I and 2). — The drawers of miscel- 
laneous remains from caverns have been carefully examined, 
and all the more important specimens have been labelled, 
removed, and placed in their systematic position in the 
cabinets. 

A selected series of bones of Mammalia from the exca- 
vations in the Roman town of Silchester, near Reading, has 
been arranged in a cabinet in the basement store-room. 

The unexhibited remains of human skeletons have been 
arranged and labelled in the drawers of table-case 1. 

The unexhibited remains of Canidae have been arranged 
and labelled in the drawers of table-case 2. 

The remains of Felidee exhibited in pier-case 3 have been 
I'e-tableted and labelled with printed labels. 

A plaster cast of a complete skeleton of Macha^rodus 
neogceus, from the Pampa Formation of , Kuenos Aires 
(original in the National Museum, Buenos Aires), has been 
mounted on a pedestal in front of Stand A. 

The lower part of pier-case 6 has been re-arranged to 
admit a new skull of Rhinoceros antiquitatis from the river 
gravel near Peterborough. 

A plaster cast of a complete skeleton of HippidiuTn 
neogmum, from the Pampa Formation of Buenos Aires 
(original in the National Museum, Buenos Aires), was 
mounted for some time on a special pedestal near table-case 5, 
and has since been removed to the Gallery of Domestic 
Animals for comparison with the skeletons of existing 
horses. 

Pier-case 11, containing the remains of Hippopotamidae, 
has been re-arranged, re-fitted, and painted, to admit a 
newly mounted skeleton of Hippopotamus minutus from 
a cavern in Cyprus. 

A newly discovered skull of Arsinoitherium zittel% from 
the Upper Eocene of the Fayum, has been placed in wall- 
case 22, which has been re-arranged and labelled. 

The pelvis of the modelled skeleton of UalitheriuTn 
schinzi in Case V has been re-fixed in a new position now 
believed to be correct. A plaster cast of the skull and 
mandible of Eotherium has been mounted in pier-case 29. 

Wall- case 27, containing the remains of gigantic extinct 
Marsupialia from Australia, has been re-arranged, re-fitted . 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 139 

and painted, to admit the newly mounted fore and hind 
limbs of Diprotodon australis. 

Number of specimens of Mammalia registered, 728. 

Aves (Gallery 2). — A few bones of birds from caverns 
have been labelled and placed in drawers with the Pleistocene 
remains. 

No new specimens registered. 

Reptilia and Amphibia (Galleries 3, 4, 5). — New cabinets 
with more commodious drawers have been fixed beneath the 
table-cases 24 to 29, and the unexhibited catalogued remains 
of Sauropterygia have been transferred to them. 

The unexhibited catalogued small remains of Dinosauria 
have been transferred to the drawers of the new cabinets 
beneath table-cases 15 to 19. 

The plaster cast of the skeleton of Iguanodon mantelli, 
from the Wealden of Bernissart, Belgium, has been removed 
and re-mounted in the Gallery of Reptiles, Department of 
Zoology, for more satisfactory comparison with Diplodocus. 

A skeleton of Pteranodon from the Chalk of Kansas, with 
the bones separately labelled, has been placed in table-case 4. 

The lower portion of wall-case 17 has been entirely 
re-arranged and re-fitted to accommodate a specimen of 
IchthyoHaurus communis from the Lower Lias of Somerset- 
shire, showing a contained embryo. 

Wall-case 19 has been partially re-arranged to admit a 
new. specimen of Pleurof^ternum from the Purbeck Beds, 
Swanage. 

The Microsaurian Labyrinthodonts exhibited in table- 
case U have been arranged and re-tableted with printed 



regis - 



labels. 

Number of specimens of Reptilia and Amphibia 
tered, 121. 

Pisces (Gallery 6). — The exhibited Ceplialaspidae in table- 
case B, and some newly acquired specimens of Asterolepis 
in table-case E, have been tableted and provided with printed 
labels. 

A new specimen of the pectoral fiiis of Protosphyrcena, 
from the Chalk of Kansas, has been mounted in a glazed 
frame on the wall between wall-cases 12 and 13. 

Table-case 26, containing Clupeoid fishes, has been 
re-arranged to accommodate recent acquisitions, and printed 
labels have been prepared. 

New printed labels have been prepared for Lepidotus in 
wall-case 9, for numerous Cretaceous and Tertiary fishes, 
and for miscellaneous recent acquisitions. 

Number of specimens of Pisces registered, 277. 



140 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Mollusca (Galleries 7 and 8). — The table-cases in Gallery 8 
have been re-numbered on the same plan as those in the 
corresponding galleries. 

Additions have been made to the exhibited series of 
British marine Post-Pliocene Mollusca, which is now as nearly 
as possible complete. 

Some newly discovered Jurassic Mollusca from Singapore 
have been mounted and labelled for exhibition. 

The labelling of the Cornbrash Ammonites has been 
revised, and additions have been made to the exhibited 
Palaeozoic Pteropoda. 

Post-Pliocene Lamellibranchia and Gastropoda from 
Barbadoes, South Africa, Southern France, and Armenia ; 
Miocene Mollusca from Hungary ; Cretaceous Mollusca from 
France, Syria, and Armenia ; Jurassic Lamellibranchia from 
France ; Carboniferous Mollusca from Belgium ; and various 
other recent acquisitions have been registered, labelled, and 
incorporated in the unexhibited collection. 

The unexhibited Wealden Lamellibranchia and Gastropoda, 
and collections from the Italian Pliocene and the West Indian 
Tertiaries, have been partly re-arranged to save space. 

Number of specimens of Mollusca registered : Cephalopoda, 
363 ; Gastropoda, 1,405 ; Lamellibranchia, 2,218. 

Arthropoda (Gallery 8). — The registration, labelling, and 
arrangement of the unexhibited Phyllocarida, Ostracoda, 
^irripedia, Phyllopoda, and Amphipoda have been completed, 
and progress has been made with the unexhibited Decapoda. 
The Cirripedia have been transferred to the drawers of a 
new cabinet, leaving additional space for the other groups. 

Some of the trilobites have been provisionally sorted into 
genera, in preparation for cataloguing. 

A second slab of Upper Cambrian limestone from North 
China, with numerous trilobites, has been mounted in a glazed 
frame on the wall between wall-cases 14 and 15. 

Number of specimens of Arthropoda registered, 184. 

Vermes (Gallery 8). — All the unexhibited specimens have 
been transferred to a new cabinet, thus leaving additional 
space for the Echinoderma. A few selected specimens have 
been mounted for exhibition with printed labels. 

Number of specimens of Vermes registered, 243. 

Polyzoa (Gallery 8 and Workroom). — A gallery has been 
fitted round the workroom behind the Departmental Library, 
to accommodate the cabinets of unexhibited Polyzoa, of which 
the arrangement was begun last year. 

Number of specimens of Polyzoa registered, 92. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 141 

Brachiopoda (Gallery 8). — The arrangement, registration, 
and labelling of the unexhibited Brachiopoda have been con- 
tinued. Progress has chiefly been made with the Devonian, 
Carboniferous, and Triassic specimens, and special attention 
has been paid to those from Australia and to the Klipstein 
Collection from the Alpine Trias. 

Several exhibited specimens from the British Carboni- 
ferous have been re-labelled, and some additions have been 
made to the series, especially among Strophomenidse. 

Number of specimens of Brachiopoda registered, 2,547. 

Echinoderma (Gallery 8). — All the unexhibited Cystidea 
and Blastoidea have been transferred to new cabinets. It 
has thus been possible to re-arrange the unexhibited British 
Crinoidea and to incorporate many recent accessions. 

Various genera of Echinoidea, mostly Mesozoic, have been 
revised, and the exhibited specimens re-mounted with printed 
labels, e.g., Hemipedina, Diademopsis, Orthopsis, and 
JEodiadema. 

A selection of Lower Devonian Ophiuroids from Bunden- 
bach has been mounted in centre-case A 3, with explanatory 
diagrams and labels. A few other additions have been made 
to the exhibited series of Echinoderma. 

Number of specimens of Echinoderma registered, 4,251. 

Anthozoa {GsiWery 10). — The collection of Jurassic Corals, 
from the Corallian, Great Oolite and Inferior Oolite forma- 
tions, has been arranged, labelled, and completely registered 
while incorporating recent acquisitions from the Tomes 
Collection. 

A typical collection of British Jurassic Corals has been 
arranged, tableted, and labelled, with explanatory diagiams, 
in table-cases 2 and 3. 

Number of specimens of Anthozoa registered, 2,795. 

Hydrozoa, Porifera, and Protozoa (Gallery 10). — The 
exhibited series of fossil Protozoa in table-cases 15 and 16 
has been extended, revised, and partly re-labelled, with 
explanatory diagrams. 

Number of specimens registered, 203. 

Plantce (Gallery 10). — The arrangement and labelling of 
the Lower Eocene plants in table-case 18 have been com- 
pleted. 

A portion of fossil tree, obtained by the Jackson-Harms- 
worth Expedition in Franz Josef Land, has been mounted 
for exhibition in wall-case 10. 

The arrangement, mounting, and labelling of the Rhajtic 
and Triassic plant-remains in wall-case 14 have been 
completed. 



142- ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The slides in the Williamson Cabinet of Carboniferous 
plants have been cleaned and re-arranged in a manner more 
convenient for ready reference. ' 

Number of specimens of Plantse registered, 65. 

11 —Work of Mason, Assistant Mason, and Workshop 
Attendant. 

Numerous Mammalian remains from the Eocene of the 
Fayum, Egypt, including a skull and mandible of Paloio- 
mastodon, have been extricated from the matrix, hardened, 
and prepared for study or exhibition. 

Plaster casts of many Eocene Mammalian remains from 
Egypt have also been made. 

A plaster cast of the skeleton of M achcer a dus from. 
the Argentine Pampa has been mounted on ironwork for 
exhibition. 

The fore and hind limbs of i^ij^roj^ocZow, from, the Pleis- 
tocene of Austi-alia, have been mounted on ironwork for 
exhibition, the scapulae and pelvis being supplied by plaster" 
casts. 

The original skull of Diprotodon has been prepared for 
more satisfactory mounting. 

The plaster cast of the skeleton of Iguanodon has been 
taken down, cleaned, and re-mounted. 

The plaster cast of the hind limb of Allosaurus has also 
been repaired and re-mounted. 

A plaster model of the skeleton of Triceratops, from 
the Upper Cretaceous of Wyoming, has been mounted on 
ironwork. 

Various skeletons of Ichthyosaurus in slabs of Lias have 
been prepared for framing. 

A skull of Pteranodon, from the Chalk of Kansas, has 
been prepared for framing. 

Numerous Dinosaurian remains from the Upper Cretaceous 
of Transylvania, and various reptilian bones from the Trias 
and Cretaceous of Brazil, have also been prepared for study 
or exhibition. 

A reptilian skeleton from the Karoo Formation of South 
Africa has been extricated from hard matrix. 

Fishes from the Chalk of Kansas, including the pectoral 
fins of Protosphyrmna, have been prepared for framing. A 
few fishes from the English Chalk have also been prepared. 

Many sections of Jurassic Corals have been made and 
polished. 

Various recently acquired fossils have been trimmed, and 
numerous plaster casts of fossils have been made for 
exchange. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 143 

ITI. — Printing of Labels, 

The Museum Printer continues to devote one day each 
week to the preparation of labels for the Department of 
Geology ; but a Boy Attendant in the Department composes 
and prints most of the labels, and has this year prepared 
upwards of 774 (and 3,188 prints of these). 

TV .—Exchanges and Duplicates. 

Exchanges of plaster casts and duplicate fossils have been 
made with the following institutions : — Surveyors' Institu- 
tion, London ; Australian Museum, Sydney ; National 
Museum of Natural History, Paris ; University of Poitiers ; 
University of Vienna; Hochschule, Leoben ; Senckenberg 
Museum, Frankfurt ; United States National Museum, 
Washington ; and American Museum of Natural History, 
New York. Small exchanges have also been made with 
Messrs. R. Kidston, A. Piret, and E. Mascke. 

Duplicate fossils have been presented to the Universities 
of Aberdeen, Glasgow, and Liverpool. Small duplicates for 
purposes of research have also been supplied to Mr. E. S. 
Goodrich, Mr. C. Jooss, Dr. H. C. Sorby, and Mr. C. S. Tomes. 

V. — Departmental Library. 

The additions to the Library, which have been registered, 
stamped, catalogued, and press-marked, comprise 286 new 
works and pamphlets, of which 164 were purchased and 
122 presented ; 220 volumes and 313 parts of serials in pro- 
gress, of which 55 volumes and 176 parts were purchased 
and 165 volumes and 137 parts were presented ; 81 maps, of 
which 4 sheets were purchased and 77 sheets presented ; and 
20 photographs and 6 sheets of diagrams, which were 
purchased. 135 volumes have been bound. 

Progress has been made in preparing a shelf-index of the 
separate works. 

A new map-case, to which the British Geological Survey 
maps have been transferred, has been provided to replace one 
of the library tables. 

VI. — Publications. 

The Descriptive Catalogue of the Tertiary Vertebrata of 
the Fayum has been published. The MSS. of the Catalogues 
of Fossil Rodentia, Marine Reptiles of the Oxford Clay, and 
Fossil Fishes (Supplement) have made progress. 

The MS. of a new Guide Book to the Fossil Invertebrate 
Animals is also in progress. 

A new List of Casts and Moulds of Fossils in the 
Department of Geology has been printed and issued. 



144 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The following descriptive papers dealing with various 
parts of the collection, chiefly recent acquisitions,^have been 
published in scientific journals during 1906 : — 

By A. S. Woodward, ll.d., f.r.s. 

1. The Study of Fossil Fishes. Proc. Geol. Assoc, 
vol. xix., pp. 266-282, text-figs. 1-15. 

2. Report on Visit to Gallery of Fossil Reptiles. Ibid., 
pp. 307-309. 

3. On a Carboniferous Fish-Fauna from the Mansfield 
District, Victoria. Mem. National Mus., Melbourne, No. 1, 
with 11 plates. 

4. On a New Specimen of the Chimseroid Fish, 
Myriacanthus paradoxus, from the Lower Lias near Lyme 
Regis f Dorset). Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. Ixii, pp. 1-4, 
pl.i. 

5. On Rhynchosaurus articeps, Owen. Rep. Brit. Assoc, 
1906, pp. 293-299, pi. ii. 

6. On a Tooth of Geratodus and a Dinosaurian Claw from 
the Lower Jurassic of Victoria, Australia. Ann. and Mag. 
Nat. Hist. [7], vol. xviii., pp. 1-3, pi. i. 

7. On Myriolepis hihernica, a Palseoniscid Fish from 
the Irish Coal Measures. Ibid., pp. 416-419, pi. x. 

8. On two Specimens of Ichthyosaurus showing contained 
Embryos. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. iii., pp, 443, 444, pi. xxiv. 

9. The Relations of Palaeontology to other Branches of 
Science. Rep. Congress Arts & Sci., St. Louis, 1904, vol. iv., 
pp. 551-565 (partly reprinted in Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist. [7], 
vol. xviii., pp. 312-318). 

By F. A. Bather, M.A., d.sc. 

1. The Species of Botryocrinus. Ottawa Naturalist, 
vol. XX., pp. 93-104. 

2. The Echinoderm Name Calvcriahystrix. xA.nn. and Mag. 
Nat. Hist. [7], vol. xvii., pp. 249-252. 

By R. B. Newton, f.g.s. 

1. Note on Swainson's Genus Voluiilithes. Proc. Malac 
Soc, vol. vii., pp. 100-104, pi. xii. 

2. Notes on some Fossils from Singapore discovered by 
John B. Scrivenor, f.g.s., Geologist to the Federated Malay 
States. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. iii., pp. 487-496, pi. XXV. 

By G. C. Crick, A.R.s.M., f.g.s. 
1. Note on a Rare Form oi Actinocamax (A. grossouvrei) 
from the Chalk of Yorkshire. The Naturalist, 1906, pp. 
155-158, pi. xvi. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 145 

By W. D. Lang, M.A., f.g.s. 

1. The Reptant Eleid Polyzoa. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. iii., 
pp. 60-6y, text-figs. 1-12. 

2. A Key to the Published Figures of the Cretaceous 
Forms of the Polyzoan genus Entalophora. Ibid., pp. 462- 

3. Notes on the Geology of Lyme Reo-is and Charmouth. 
Proc. Geol. Assoc, vol. xix., pp. 323, 324, 328, 329. 

4. Cretaceous Polyzoa from Pondoland. Ann. S. African 
Mus., vol. iv., pp. 282-286, pi. xxxiii., figs. 10-12. 



By Miss D. M. A. Bate. 

1. The Pigmy Hippopotamus of Cyprus. Geol. Mag. [5], 
vol. iii., pp. 241-245, pi. xv. 

By R. F. Scharff", PH.D. 

1. On the Former Occurrence of the African Wild Cat 
(Felis ocreata, Gmel.) in Ireland. Proc. Roy. Irish Acad., 
vol. xxvi., sect. B., pp. 1-12, pi. i. 

By Charles S. Tomes, M.A., f.r.s. 

1. On the Minute Structure of the Teeth of Creodonts, 
with especial reference to their suggested resemblance to 
Marsupials. Proc. Zool. Soc, 1906, vol. i., pp. 45-58, text- 
figs. 

By Baron Franz Nopcsa, Jun. 

1. Remarks on the supposed Clavicle of the Sauropodous 
Dinosaur, Diplodocus. Proc. Zool. Soc, 1905, vol. ii., 
pp. 289-294, text-figs. 

By W. J. Holland, ll.d. 

1. The Osteology of Diplodocus, Marsh. Mem. Carnegie 
Museum, vol. ii., no. 6. 

By Baron F. von Huene. 

1. Ueber die Dinosaurier der Aussereuropaeischen Trias. 
Geol. and Palseont. Abhandl, n.s., vol. viii. (1906), pt. 2. 

By C. Davies Sherborn, f.g.s. 

1. Remarks on the Irregular Echinoids of the White 
Chalk of England, as exhibited in the British Museum (Nat. 
Hist.). Geol. Mag. [5], vol. iii., pp. 31-33. 

105. K 



146 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

By Upfield Green, r.G.s., and C. Davies Sherborn, f.g.s. 

1. Lists of Wenlockian Fossils from Porthalla ; and 
Taimusian Fossils from Polyne Quarry, near Looe, CornwalL 
Geol. Mag. [5], vol. iii., pp. 33-35. 

By S. S. Biickman, f.g.s. 

1. Brachiopod Homoeomorphy : Pygope, Antinomia, 
Pygites. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. Ixii., pp. 433-455. 
pi. xli. 

By Miss Ethel M. R. Wood, d.sc. 

1. On Graptolites from Bolivia, collected by Dr. J. W. 
Evans in 1901-2. Quart. Journ. Geol. SoC; vol. Ixii., 
pp. 431, 432. 

By Philip Lake, M.A., F.G.S. 

1. Trilobites from Bolivia, collected by Dr. J. W. Evans 
in 1901-1902. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. Ixii., pp. 425- 
430, pi. xl. 

By K. A. Gronwall, ph.d. 

1. On the Occurrence of the Genus Dimyodon, Mun.- 
Chalm., in the Mesozoic Rocks of Great Britain. Geol. 
Mag. [5], vol. iii., pp. 202-205. 

By Miss Jane Donald (Mrs. G. B. LongstafF). 

1. Notes on the Genera Omospira, Lophospira, and 
Turritoma ; with Descriptions of New Proterozoic vSpecies. 
Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, vol. Ixii., pp. 552-572, pis. xliii., 
xliv. 

By R. Ashington Bullen, b.a., f.g.s. 

1. Notes on some Microzoa and Mollusca from East 
Crete. Geol. Mag. [5], vol. iii., pp. 354-358, pis. xviii., xix. 

By D. H. Scott, f.r.s., and A. J. Maslen, F.L.s. 

1. Note on the Structure of Trigonocarpon olivceforme. 
Ann. Botany, vol. xx., pp. 109-112. 

Assistance has been given by Messrs. R. B. Newton and 
G. C. Crick to Dr. Felix Oswald in the preparation of the 
palseontological part of his " Treatise on the Geology of 
Armenia " (1906). 

Various fossils in the Department of Geology have also 
been described and figured by Prof. S. H. Reynolds, Dr. R. 
H. Traquair, Mr. Henry Woods, Mr. Philip Lake, Miss Elles, 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 147 

and Miss Wood (Mrs. Shakespear), in the Monographs of the 
Palseontographical Society, vol. Ix., for 1906. 

Specimens have been lent for original research to 
Mr. Henry Woods (Cambridge). Dr. Wheelton Hind (Stoke- 
on-Trent), Mr. L. Richardson (Cheltenham), Mr. E,. Kidston 
(Stirling), Prof. F. W. Oliver (London), Miss E. M. R. Wood 
(Birmingham), Dr. Otto Reis (Munich), Mr. Philip Lake 
(Cambridge), Prof. T. D. A. Cockerell (Colorado), Prof. A. C. 
Seward (Cambridge), Mr. E. A. Newell Arber (Cambridge), 
Prof. J. W. Gregory (Glasgow), Prof. L. Joubin (Paris), 
Dr. R. H. Traquair (Edinburgh), and Prof. F. E. Weiss 
(Manchester). 



VII. — A cquisitions. 

A. — By Donation. 

Mammalia. — About 200 Mammalian remains collected by 
Dr. C. W. Andrews, f.r.s., from the Eocene of Fayum, Egypt, 
including a skull and mandible of Palceomastodon, an 
immature mandible of PalcBomastodon, a skull and other 
remains of Arsinoitherium, and a mandibular ramus of 
Saghatherium. Presented by W. E. de Winton, Esq. 

Portions of the skull of Prozeuglodon atrox, from the 
Eocene of Fayum, Egypt, Presented by the Egyptian 
Government. 

One skull, one axis, two imperfect cervicals, and eight 
dorsals of Moeritherium., and a portion of mandible of 
Arsinoitherium, from the Eocene of Fayum. Presented by 
Baron Franz Nopcsa, jun. 

Portion of a molar tooth of Elephas africanus from the 
face of a coral cliff on the W. side of the island of Zanzibar. 
Presented by Sir John Kirk, G.C.M.G., f.e.s. 

A plaster cast of an abnormal tusk of Indian elephant, 
the original being in the Paris Museum. Presented by 
the Hon. Walter Rothschild, m.p.. Trustee of the British 
Museum. 

Bovine tibia from a submerged forest at Leasowe, 
Cheshire. Presented by J. H. Milton, Esq. 

A hundred and eighty bones of Equus, Bos, Cervus, 
Capreolus, Ovis, and Canis, from excavations on the site of 
the Roman town of Silchester, Hants. Presented by His 
Grace the Duke of Wellington, k.g. 

Forty portions of the skull and skeleton of voles {Microtus 
gregalis and M. ratticeps) from a cavern at Clevedon, 
Somerset. Presented by Herbert C. Male, Esq., M.D. 

Portion of a skull of Felis pardus from peat, probably of 
Ireland. Presented by M. P. Price, Esq. 

K 2 



148 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Portions of a skull of Sarcojphilus laniarius from a river 
deposit, King's Creek, Pilton, Queensland. Presented by 
George F. Bennett, Esq. 

Vertebra and distal end of ulna of Diprotodon from 
South Australia. Presented by H. J. Hillier, Esq. 

Aves. — Five plaster casts of brains of Archceopteryx and 
bil'ds, described by the donor in Nat. Hist. Review, 1865, 
new series, vol. 5, p. 415. ' Presented by Sir John Evans, 
K.C.B., F.R.S., Trustee of the British Museum. 

Bones of birds from excavations on the site of the Roman 
town of Silchester, Hants. Presented by His Grace the Duke 
of Wellington, E.G. 

Reptilia. — Thirteen plaster casts and seven gutta-percha 
impressions of specimens of Procolophon from Fernrocks, 
Cape Colony, illustrating the donor's paper in Proc. Zool. 
Soc. 1905, vol. i., pp. 218-230, text-figs. 30-38 ; also a frag- 
•rnent of Procolophon, and a gutta-percha impression of part 
of skull of Petrophryne from the same locality. Presented 
by Professor H. G. Seeley, F.R.S. 

Two specimens of Ichthyosaurus and one specimen of 
Plesiosaurus from the Lower Lias, Lyme Regis, Dorset. 
Presented by the Rev. R. Ashington Bnllen, F.G.s. 

Portion of a CheJonian skull and two Chelonian vertebrae 
from the Kimmeridge Clay. Presented by G. E. Dibley, 
Esq., F.G.S. 

Portion of the skull of Goniop>holis crassidens from the 
"Wadhurst Clay, Brede Quarry, near Rye, Sussex. Presented 
hy F. Ross Thomson, Esq., F.G.S. 

An Ichthyosaurian tooth from the Neocomian of Ampthill, 
Beds. Presented by G. C. Crick, Esq., F.G.s. 

A plaster model of the skeleton of Pteranodon longiceps 
from the Cretaceous of Kansas, prepared under the direction 
of Dr. George F. Eaton. Presented by the Peabody Museum 
of Yale University, U.S.A. 

Eight reptilian remains (including the mandibular 
symphysis of " Crocodilus " hartti) from the Cretaceous of 
Bahia, Brazil. Presented by Joseph Mawson, Esq., F.G.S. 

Twenty reptilian bones from Eocene of Fayum, Egypt. 
Presented by W. E. de Winton, Esq. 

Fourteen vertebrae of Pterosphenus schweinfurthi from 
the Middle Eocene of Fayum, Egypt. Presented by Baron 
Franz Nopcsa, jun. 

Twenty bones of Didosaurus mauritianus, from Mauri- 
tius. Presented by C. Forster Cooper, Esq. 

Pisces. — Sixteen fishes from the Coal Measures of Com- 
mentry, France. Presented by Monsieur Fayol. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 149 

Six plaster casts of the jaws of Mylostoma beecheri from 
the Upper Devonian, Portage Group, of Mount Morris, New 
York ; the original specimens in the Yale University Museum 
being the type described and figured by Dr. Eastman. 
Presented by Prof. Charles Schuchert. 

A fish tooth (Deltodus ?) from the Archceocidaris bed, 
Lower Carboniferous, top of Shap Abbey cliff, Shap. Pre • 
sented by Prof. E. J. Garwood, f.g.s. 

Thirty-five remains of Carboniferous fishes from Mans- 
field, Victoria, Australia. Presented by the Director, National 
Museum, Melbourne. 

Four teeth of Lepidotus from the Neocomian, Ampthill, 
Beds. Presented by G. C. Crick, Esq., f.g.s. 

Thirty three fish remains, including the types of Diplo- 
TTiystus longicostatus, Chiromystus mawsoni, and Mawsonia 
gigas, from the Cretaceous of Bahia, Brazil. Presented by 
Joseph Mawson, Esq., f.g.s. 

Three portions of the rostrum of Pristis and twenty 
remains of Fayumia, from the Middle Eocene of Fayum, 
Egypt. Presented by Baron Franz Nopcsa, jun. 

A fish tooth (Hemipristis serra) from the Middle Miocene, 
Asphalt Quarries, Ragusa, Sicily. Presented by Ambroise 
Pare Brown, Esq. 

Mollusca. — Twelve MoUusca from the Lower Palaeozoic 
rocks of Ontario, Canada. Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

Forty-nine Mollusca from the Silurian of Shropshire. 
Presented by Col. J. A. Anstice, c.b. 

One Orthoceratite from the Lower Ludlow, Builth. 
Presented by Dr. A. S. Woodward, f.r.s. 

An Orthoceras from the Lower Devonian (Taunusian), 
Fowey Harbour, Cornwill. Presented by W. D. Lang, Esq., 
f.g.s. 

A supposed Orthoceratite from the Lower Devonian, 
Crealsa Quarry, Zealla, Cornwall. Presented by C. Davies 
Sherborn, Esq., f.g.s. 

Eight Gastropods and seven Lamellibranchs from the 
Lower Devonian of Mayenne. Presented by F. A. Bather, 
Esq., D.sc. 

One Lamellibranch from the Carboniferous Limestone, 
Uphill, near Weston-super-Mare. Presented by Laurence 
Riley, Esq. 

Four Lamellibranchs and one Cephalopod from the 
Muschelkalk, Vittel (Vosges\ France. Presented by B. B. 
Woodward, Esq., f.l.s. 

One Gastropod {Eucyclus) from the Middle Lias, Upper 
Shuckburgh, Warwickshire. Presented by Miss Caroline 
Shuckburgh. 



150 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Five Belemnites and twenty Lamellibranchs, from the 
Oxford Clay near Chippenham. Presented by Sir John T. 
Goldney. 

Six natural casts of the Gastropod Pleiirotomaria, from 
the Portlandian beds of Swindon. Presented by A. D. 
Passmore, Esq. 

Two Ammonites, two Gastropods, and five Lamellibranchs 
from the Portland beds of Swindon. Presented by Chas. H. 
Gore, Esq, 

One Ammonite from the Jurassic, Mombasa, E, Africa. 
Presented by J. T. Last, Esq. 

Five Lamellibranchs, described and figured by R. B. 
Newton, Geol. Mag., 1906, p. 487, pi. xxv., from the Jurassic 
of Singapore. Presented by Dr. R. Hanitsch. 

One Gastropod and seventeen Lamellibranchs, described 
and figured by R. B. -Newton, Geol. Mag., 1906, p. 487, 
pi. XXV., from the Jurassic of Singapore. Presented by 
John B. Scrivenor, Esq., F.G.S, 

Two rock-specimens containing shells described as Denta- 
lium huttoni, by F. A. Bather, Geol. Mag., 1905, p. 537, 
probably of Lower Jurassic age, from New Zealand. Pre- 
sented by H.M.S. " Discovery." 

A portion of Nautilus (probably N. undulatus) from the 
Lower Greensand, Bargate Stone Quarry, Hascombe, near 
Godalming. Presented by Joseph Godman, Esq. 

A portion of Ammonite {Hoplites interru2^tus) from the 
Albian, Black Ven, Charmouth, Dorset. Presented by Miss 
Crosfield. 

One Actinocamax from the MaTSU2ntes-zone, Surrey. 
Presented by Messrs. T. H. Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 

Five Gastropods and two Cephalopods from the Upper 
Chalk, Norwich, from the Bayfield Collection ; one Gastropod 
and one Ammonite from the Lower Chalk, Southeram, near 
Lewes. Presented by B. B. Woodward, Esq., f.l.s. 

Two limestone casts of Lamellibranchs from the Creta- 
ceous rocks of Lebanon. Presented by Miss E. H. Trower. 

A fragmentary SeiDtifer of (?) Cretaceous age from Abu 
Rahal, E. of Edfu on the Nile, Egypt. Presented by the 
Geological Survey of Egypt. 

One Cephalopod, fifty-five Gastropods, and twelve 
Lamellibranchs from the Upper Cretaceous, Helvetian, 
Tortonian, and Sarmatian formations of Hunyad County, 
Hu:igary. Presented by Baron Franz Nopcsa, jun. 

One Ammonite, two Gastropods, and seven Lamellibranchs 
from the Upper Cretaceous of Kerak, Moab. Presented by 
Dr. F. Johnson. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 151 

Two Lameliibranchs (Gyrena horneensis) from the Eocene 
(coal beds) of Borneo. Presented by I. A. Stigand, Esq. 

A specimen of Oligocene Limnce a-limestone of Beauce, 
showing concretionary structure, from St. Martin's Hill, 
Etampes. Presented by Mon.sieur Georges Courty. 

One. Lameliibranch (Acesta miocenica) from the Middle 
Miocene Asphalt Quarries, Ragusa, Sicily. Presented by 
Ambrbise Pare Brown, Esq. 

Thirty marine Gastropoda, and three marine Lamelli- 
branchia from the Upper Pliocene, Kai Twi, North Island, 
New Zealand. Presented by S. S. Stedman, Esq. 

Six Lameliibranchs from the Tertiary of Formosa. Pre- 
sented by J. D. La Touche, Esq. 

Two masses of agglutinated shells (chiefly a small species 
of Cardium), probably of Post-Pliocene age, from Shark's 
Bay, W. Australia. Presented by W. E. Balston, Esq., f.g.s. 

Ninety-five Gastropods and thirty-two Lameliibranchs 
from marine Post-Pliocene deposits, Port Elizabeth, S. Africa. 
Presented by Major A. J. Peile. 

Five Gastropods and eleven Lameliibranchs from marine 
Post-Pliocene bed of Ceylon. Presented by A. K. Coomara- 
swamy, Esq., D.sc. 

Three Gastropods and seven Lameliibranchs from an 
Upper Tertiary formation at Koetei, Eastern Borneo. Pre- 
sented by I. A. Stigand, Esq. 

Three Tertiary Gastropoda and one Lameliibranch from 
the Tochi River district, N. India. Presented by Captain 
E. L. Perry. 

Fourteen Helix nemoralis from the Holocene, Dag's Bay, 
Co. Galway. Presented by A. S. Kennard, Esq., F.G.s. 

One Vallonia pulchella from the Holocene deposits of 
Walton Heath, Surrey. Presented by R. H. Chandler, Esq. 

Arthropoda. — A large slab containing numerous remains 
of Trilobites from the Upper Cambrian, Shantung, N. China. 
Presented by the Rev. Samuel Couling. 

One Trilobite from the Llandeilo Flags, Llandrindod 
Wells. Presented by Dr. A. S. Woodward, f.r.s. 

Fifteen Trilobites of Cambrian, Ordovician, and Devonian 
ages from the Province of Caupolican, Bolivia, collected by 
the donor. Described (and nine specimens figured) by P. 
Lake, Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 1906, pp. 425-430, p]. xl. 
Presented by Dr. J. W. Evans, f.g.s. 

Seven Trilobites from the Palseozoic rocks of Ontario, 
Canada. Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

Fourteen Cirripedia from the Silurian of Shropshire. 
Presented by Col. J. A. Anstice, C.B. 



152 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

One Trilobite from Thorald, Ontario, Canada. Presented 
by Samuel Henry Tickell, Esq. 

Portion of the cephalon of a Trilobite, Cyhele ella, from 
the Black River Limestone, Petite Chaudiere, Mechanicsville, 
Ottawa. Presented by J. E. Narraway, Esq. 

Six Trilobites from the Lower Devonian of Mayenne. 
Presented by F. A. Bather, Esq., D.sc. 

Twenty-one Insects from the Coal Measures of Commentry. 
Presented by Monsieur Fayol. 

The type-specimen of Griffithides barkei, from the Culm- 
Measures, Bishopston, Glamorganshire ; described and figured 
by Dr. H. Woodward, Geol. Mag., 1902, pp. 484-487, pi. xx., 
figs. 14 and 15. Presented by F. Barke, Esq., F.G.S. 

One Crustacean from the Upper Cretaceous of Kerak, 
Moab. Presented by Dr. F. Johnson. 

Four Crustacea from the Post-Pliocene of Ceylon. Pre- 
sented by A. K. Coomaraswamy, Esq,, d.sc. 

Echinoderma. — Thirty fragments of Blastoidocrinus 
carchariedens from the Chazy Limestone, Valcour Island, 
Lake Champlain. Presented by Prof. G. H. Hudson. 

Thirty-two Cystidea (Eocystis, Trochocystis, &c.) from 
Upper A.cadian of Coulouma, Herault. Presented by Monsieur 
Jean Miquel. 

Twenty-three Crinoids from the Niagara Group of Decatur- 
Co., Tennessee, namely, two Coccocrinus hacca and twenty- 
one Talarocrinus. Presented by the Hon. Frank Springer. 

Forty-six Crinoidea from the Silurian of Shropshire. 
Presented by Col. J. A. Anstice, c.b. 

A plaster cast of the type-specimen of the Blastoid 
Pentrcmites maccalliei. Presented by the Director, U.S. 
National Museum, Washington. 

A Crinoid, Thylacocrinus, from the Lower Devonian of 
Mayenne, and eight Crinoid remains from the Carboniferous 
Limestone, Coniston Cold, Skipton. Presented by F. A. 
Bather, Esq., D.SC. 

Nine Crinoid columnals {Entrochus insignis) from the 
Trias, near Kotel, Bulgaria. Presented by Dr. P. Bakalow. 

Seventy stem-fragments of Isocrinus jurensis, and one 
rock with the remains of Isocrinus sp. from the Middle Lias, 
Shuckburgh, Warwickshire. Presented by Miss Caroline 
Shuckburgh. 

One Echinoid, Infulaster excentricus, from the Chalk of 
Holaster ijlanus zone at Great Limber, Lincolnshire, noticed 
by the donor in Geol. Mag., April 1904, p. 175. Presented by 
Arthur Burnet, Esq. 

Thirteen irregular Echinoids from various zones of the 
English Chalk. Presented by A. W. Rowe, Esq , m.b. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. ]53 

Eleven Echinoderms from the Upper Chalk (zone of 
B. mucronata) and sixty miscellaneous Chalk Echinoderms 
from Rugen. Presented b_y Frau Agnes Laur. 

Four plaster casts of Cretaceous Echinoids described by 
Desor (two Echinoconus abbreviatus, one Galerites conica, 
and one Galerites globulus). Presented by the Director, 
Museum of Natural History, Geneva. 

Two Upper Cretaceous Echinoids from Kerak, Moab. 
Presented by Dr. F. Johnson. 

One Echinoid, Cidaris cretosa, from the Upper Chalk 
(zone of Micraster coranguinum), St. Margaret's Bay, near 
Dover. Presented by Dr. Felix Oswald. 

Two Spatangoid Echinoids, from the Middle Eocene, 
Quasr-el-Sagha, Fayum, Egypt. Presented by Baron Franz 
Nopcsa, junr. 

One Echinoid from an Upper Tertiary formation at Koeti. 
Eastern Borneo. Presented by I. A. Stigand, Esq. 

Brachiopoda. — One Brachiopod from the Skiddaw Slates, 
near Ke«wick. Presented by Miss Esther Christopherson. 

Twenty-two Brachiopoda from the Palteozic rocks of 
Ontario, Canada. Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

Three hundred and seventy Brachiopoda from the Silurian 
of Shropshire. Presented by Col. J. A. Anstice, c.B. 

Forty-two Brachiopods from the Lower Devonian of 
Mayenne ; twenty Brachiopods from the Devonian of Ferques, 
Boulonnais ; ten Brachiopods from the Carboniferous Lime- 
stone of Skip ton ; and six Brachiopods from the Jurassic 
of Calvados. Presented by F. A. Bather, Esq., d.sc. 

Two Brachiopods from the Muschelkalk of Vittel (Vosges), 
France. Presented by B. B. Woodward, Esq., f.l.s. 

Two Brachiopods from the Upper Chalk (zone of B. 
mucronata) of Biigen. Presented by Frau Agnes Laur. 

Nine Brachiopods from the Chalk of Surrey, namely, six 
Terebratula, one Terebratulina, and two Rhyjichonella ; six 
Brachiopods from the Upper Chalk (zone of M. cor- 
testudinarium) near Whyteleafe, Surrey. Presented by 
Messrs. T. H. Withers and C. P. Chatwin. 

One Brachiopod, Magas pumilus, from the Upper Chalk 
(zone of M. cor-anguinum), Selsdon Road Station, Croydon. 
Presented by Laurence Riley, Esq. 

Three Brachiopods (internal casts of Terebratula) from 
Lower Drift (probably derived from the zone of Micraster 
cor-anguinum) near Gillingham. Presented by W. Gamble, 
Esq. 

Pieces of shale containing Lingulce, probably of Cretaceous 
age, from Abu Rahal, E. of Edfu on the Nile, Egypt. Pre- 
sented by the Geological Survey of Egypt. 



154 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

One Brachiopod in a limestone from the Tochi River 
district. North India. Presented by Captain E. L. Perry. 

Vermes. — Two worms from the Palseozoic rocks of Ontario, 
Canada. Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

Two specimens of supposed Annelid tracks (Nereites) 
from the grit beds below the Millstone Grit, Wick-in-Abson, 
Gloucestershire. Presented by W. H. Wicks, Esq. 

Five rock specimens containing Annelid-tubes, described 
as T'orlessia mackayi by Dr. F. A. Bather, Geol. Mag. 1905, 
p. 537, probably of Lower Jurassic age ; from various localities 
in New Zealand. Presented by H.M.S. "Discovery." 

Two specimens of Sirpula turhinella from the Upper 
Chalk, Newburn, near Calbourne, Isle of Wight. Presented 
by C. Davies Sherborn, Esq., f.g.s. 

Numerous Annelida from the Chalk of Riigen. Presented 
by Frau Agnes Laur. 

One recent Annelid from Ceylon. Presented by A. K. 
Coomaraswamy, Esq., D.sc. 

Polyzoa. — Eleven Polyzoa from the Palaeozoic tocks of 
Ontario, Canada. Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

One Polyzoan from the Silurian of Shropshire. Presented 
by Col. J. A. Anstice, c.b. 

A slab with the Polyzoan Rhahdomeson, from the Cayton 
Gill beds (Middle Millstone Grits of Hampsthwaite, Yorkshire). 
Presented by E. Hawkes worth, Esq. 

A piece of Polyzoan bed, Lower Carboniferous, Failand, 
near Bristol. Presented by W. H. Wicks, Esq. 

Three Polyzoa from the Lower Greensand {Perna bed), 
Sandown, Isle of Wight. Presented by Col. L. Worthington 
Wilmer. 

Portions of a Polyzoan, Entaloxjhora ramosisshna, from 
the Upper Greensand, Haddon Hill, Charmouth, Dorset. 
Presented by J. J. Lister, Esq., f.e.s. 

Polyzoa from the Upper Chalk of Riigen. Presented by 
Frau Agnes Laur. 

One Eeptoceritites rowei from the Upper Chalk (zone of 
31. cor-testiidinarium). Middle Assendon, near Henley-on- 
Thames. Presented by Osborne White, Esq., F.G.S. 

Three Memhranipora from the Chalk (zone of H. p^lanus), 
Borstal Manor, Kent. Presented by W. Gamble, Esq. 

Three microscope slides of Polyzoa from the Chalk (zone 
of M. cor-anguinum), Loudwater, Bucks. Presented by 
LI. Treacher, Esq., f.g.s. 

Coelentera." Thirteen Graptolites (including two figured 
specimens) from the Skiddaw Slates, near Keswick. Pre- 
sented by Miss Esther Christopherson. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 155 

Twelve Graptolites of Arenig age from Rio Coranhuata 
and Rio de Amantala, Bolivia, collected by the donor. 
Described by Miss E. M. R. Wood, Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc, 
1906, pp. 431, 432. Presented by Dr. J. W. Evans, f.g.s. 

Three Corals from the Palseozoic rocks of Ontario, Canada. 
Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

Three Corals from the Silurian of Shropshire. Presented 
by Col. J. Anstice, c.b. 

Seven Corals {Favosites, Ghaetetes) from the Lower 
Devonian of Mayenne. Presented by F. A. Bather, Esq. D.sc. 

Three Corals (Cystiphylhim) from the Middle Devonian, 
Couvinian, of Land's End Quarry, S. of Torquay, S. Devon. 
Presented by A. J. Jiikes-Browne, Esq., f.g.s. 

Seven pieces of Lithostrotion from the Carboniferous 
Limestone of Ingleton, Yorkshire. Presented by F. A. 
Bather, D.sc. 

Nine Corals {Coelosmilia) from the Upper Chalk of 
Riigen. Presented by Frau Agnes Laur. 

Two Actinozoa from Hunyad County, Hungary. Pre- 
sented by Baron Franz Nopcsa, junr. 

Thirteen specimens of the Hydrozoan, Kerunia cornuta, 
trom the Upper Eocene, Fayum, Egypt. Presented by 
Dr. C. W. Andrews, f.r.s. 

Twelve Actinozoa from a fossiliferous limestone from 
the Tochi River district, N. India. Presented by Captain 
E. L. Perry. 

Six Corals from an Upper Tertiary formation of Koetei, 
Eastern Borneo. Presented by I. A. Stigand, Esq. 

Porifera. — One sponge from the Palaeozoic rocks of 
Ontario, Canada. Presented by Col. C. C. Grant. 

One Siphonia from the Cowstone beds, Upper Greensand, 
Charmouth, Dorset. Presented by Dr. G. Schulze. 
-■ Five Porosphcera from the Upper Chalk (zone oi Mar- 
supites). Surrey. Presented by Messrs. T. H. Withers and 
C. P. Chatwin. 

Sponges from the Upper Chalk of Riigen. Presented by 
Frau Agnes Laur. 

One sponge (Clione cretacea) boring Inoceramus from 
the Upper Chalk, zone of M. cor-anguinuon, near Gillingham, 
Kent. Presented by W. Gamble, Esq. 

, A sponge in limestone from the Tochi River district, 
N. India. Presented by Captain E. L. Perry. 

Protozoa. — A piece of Radiolarian Chert from Mullion 
Island, Cornwall. Presented by Howard Fox, Esq.,. f.g.s. 
. One Cretaceous Foraminifer from Hunyad County, 
Hungary. Presented by Baron Franz Nopcsa, jun. 



156 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Four Foraminifei'a (Nummulites, &c.) from a limestone 
from the Tochi River district, N. India. Presented by 
Captain E. L. Perry. 

A piece of Tertiary Orbitoidal limestone from Balek 
Papan, Eastern Borneo. Presented by I. A. Stigand, Esq. 

Plantoe. — One plant from the Silurian of Ontario, Canada. 
Presented by Colonel C. C. Grant. 

Two fossils, probably plant-remains, associated with the 
Glossopteris flora in a sandstone about three miles from 
Johannesburg, S. Africa. Presented by George H. Preston, 
Esq. 

Three plants of Jurassic age from Singapore, described by 
R. B. Newton, Geol. Mag., 1906, p. 487, pi. xxv. Presented 
by John B. Scrivenor, Esq., F.G.S. 

Two plants of Jurassic age from Singapore, described by 
R. B. Newton, Geol. Mag., 1906, p. 487, pi. xxv. Presented 
by Dr. R. Hanitsch. 

A coal-ironstone nodule containing dicotyledonous leaves, 
from the Eocene coal-beds of Koetei, Borneo. Presented by 
I. A. Stigand, Esq. 

Two pieces of travertine containing leaves {Ficus sp.) 
from a Pleistocene formation, two miles from Sheikh, Golio 
Mts., Somaliland. Presented by Lieut. Frederick Reginald 
Burnside. 

Problematical Fossils. — A piece of chalk-flint containing 
a problematical fossil. Presented by the Rev. R. Ashington 
Bullen, F.G.S. 

Rock Specimens. — A piece of contorted schist from the 
Hardanger Fjord, Norway. Presented by Walter Child, 
Esq., A.R.S.M. 

Fragment of a facetted and striated boulder of quartzite, 
collected by Dr. H. Warth in the Carboniferous boulder-bed 
of the Punjab Salt Range. Presented by Mrs. Blanford. 

Two pieces of fossiliferous limestone from Kerak, Moab. 
Presented by Dr. F. Johnson. 

A collection of fossiliferous nodules of Tertiary age from 
the Mekran coast, N.W. India. Presented by F. W. Town- 
send, Esq. 



B. — By Purchase. 

Mammalia. — Forty remains of a pigmy elephant, and of 
Elephas meridionalis from the caverns of Crete, collected 
by Miss D. M. A. Bate. 

The astragalus of a ground sloth from Argentina. 

The skull and mandible of Sus and other Mammalian 
remains from the Lower Pliocene, Concud, Spain. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 157 

Thirty bones of Lynx from Gales Dale Cavern, Derby- 
shire, described by W. Storrs Fox, Proc. Zool. Soc, 1906, 
vol. i., p. 65, text-lig. 26. 

Reptilia. — Two slabs of footprints from the Keuper, 
Storeton, Cheshire. 

A skeleton of Ichthyosaurus from the Lower Lias, 
Somersetshire, containing embryo, described by Dr. Chaning 
Pearce in Ann. and Mag. Nat. Hist., vol. xvii. (1846), 
pp. 44-46. 

A skull of Ichthyosaurus from the Lower Lias, Char- 
mouth, Dorset, showing the remains of skin. 

A portion of skull of Petrosuchus levidens, a shell of 
Pleurosternum, a slab of scutes of Goniojyholis, and one 
Chelonian costal bone, from the Purbeck beds, Swanage. 

A collection of reptilian remains, chiefly Dinosaurian, 
from the Upper Cretaceous, Transylvania, including the 
type-skull of Limnosaurus transylv aniens and remains of 
Mochlodon, described by Baron Nopcsa in Denkschr. Akad. 
Wiss. Wien, 1900-02-04. 

A mandible of Coniasaurus crassidens from the English 
Chalk. 

A skull of Fteranodon from the Chalk of Kansas, dis- 
covered by C. H. Sternberg. 

A Pterodactyl bone from the Gault of Folkestone. 

-Pisces. — A specimen of Wardichthys cyclosoma from the 
Lower Carboniferous of N. Berwick. 

Fifteen vertebrate remains from the Coal Measures, 
Northumberland, some described by T. P. Barkas, "Coal 
Measure Palaeontology." 

One Pholidophorus from the Lower Lias, Charmouth, 
Dorset. 

Seven Ganoid fishes from the Jurassic, S. Maria de Meya, 
Lerida, Spain. 

Two fish-teeth from the Lower Cretaceous, Potton, 
Bedfordshire. 

A portion of a fish-skull, from the Gault^ Folkestone. 

Fins of Protosphyrcena, two skulls of Protosphyrcena, 
one Chimaeroid fin-spine, two groups of teeth of Ptychodus, 
two remains ot Gorax, and one Lamna from the Chalk of 
Kansas, collected by C. H. Sternberg. 

A jaw of Ptychodus decurrens, two groups of teeth of 
Ptychodus, and five other fish-remains from the English 
Chalk. 

Mollusca. — Two Cephalopoda from the Ordovician of 
Bohemia. 

Sixty-seven Cephalopoda from the Trias of Sicily. 



158 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Seven hundred invertebrate fossils, chiefly Cephalopoda 
from the Middle Trias of Bosnia (Hawelka collection). 

One Nautilus intermedins, one polished section of 
Nautilus striatus, and one body of a Belemnite, from the 
Lower Lias of Charmouth, Dorset, 

Six Cephalopoda from the Jurassic of East Africa. 

One Nautilus farringdon6nsis from the Lower Cre- 
taceous of Potton, Bedfordshire. 

Two Cephalopoda from the Cretaceous of Bohemia. 

One Crioceras sinnosissiwiurii from the Uitenhage series, 
S. Africa. 

Five Ammonites from the English Chalk. 

Lower Cretaceous Cephalopoda and Lamellibranchs from 
Germany. 

Eleven Cephalopoda, seventy Gastropoda, and forty-six 
Lamellibranchia (Cretaceous, five Jurassic Cephalopoda, and 
four Paiseozoic Cephalopoda). 

Mollusca from the Chalk of Riigen. 

The J. D. Sainter Collection of Pleistocene Marine Shells 
from the Glacial Drift of Macclesfield, described by R. D. 
Darbishire in Mem. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Manch. [3], vol. iii 
(1865), pp. 56-66. 

Arthropoda. — Eight Anthrapalcemon etheridgei from the 
Lower Carboniferous of N. Berwick. 

EcJiino derma. — One Botryocrinus pinnulatus, from the 
Wenlock Limestone, Dudley, described by F. A. Bather, 
Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist., March, 1892, p. 192. 

One Cystid and one Cretaceous Echinoid. 

Two slabs of Pentacrinus leuthardti, and one 
Ophiom^usium ferrugineum from the Bathonian near 
Liestal, Switzerland. 

Micraster cor-bovis from the zone of Holaster planus, 
Borstal Manor, Kent. 

Crinoids from the Chalk of Riigen. 

A hundred invertebrate fossils, chiefly Echinoids, from 
the Thomas Wrigj^t Collection. 

Brachiopoda. — A specimen of Acanthothyris spinosa, 
from the Jurassic of France. 

Brachiopoda from the Chalk of Riigen. 

Vermes. — Worms from the Chalk of Riigen. 

Polyzoa. — Polyzoa from the Chalk of Riigen. 

One hundred and thirty-four micro-organisms, chiefly 
Polyzoa, from the English Chalk. 

Coelentera. — One Buthograptus laxus from the Upper 
Llandeilo, Hartfell Spa. 

Two Corals from the Corallian of Ringstead, Weymouth. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 159 

Porifera. — Two Cretaceous Sponges from Farringdon 
and from Haldon Hill. 

Va7'ious Invertebrata. — A hundred and seventy-five 
Inverfcebrata from the Post-Pliocene, Pliocene, Cretaceous, 
and Jurassic rocks of the Alpes Maritimes. 

Five problematical fossils from the Kimmeridge Clay, 
Weymouth. 

Seventy-three Invertebrata, chiefly from the London 
Clay. 

Plantce. — Fifty-two microscope slides of Carboniferous. 
Plants, prepared by J. Lomax. 

C. — By Exchange. 

Mammalia. — Plaster cast of skeleton of Machcerodus 
neogceiis from Pampa Formation, Buenos Aires. From 
National Museum, Buenos Aires. 

Ten piaster casts of feet of ancestral horses. From 
American Museum of Natural History, New York. 

Three polished sections of Cetacean teeth and one section 
of rib from Red Crag. From the Surveyors' Institution, 

Reptilia. — Plaster model of the skeleton of Triceratops^ 
from Upper Cretaceous, Wyoming, From U.S. National 
Museum, Washington, 

Pisces. — Plaster casts of Ichthyodectes maratkonensis 
from Lower Cretaceous, Central Queensland, and Ganoi'hyn- 
chus sussmilchi from Devonian, New South Wales. From 
Australian Museum, Sydney. 

Forty-six teeth and spines of Elasmobranch fishes from 
Carboniferous Limestone, Tournai, Belgium. From Monsieur 
A. Piret. 

Ten ganoid fishes (Colohodus, Dapedius, SpanioUpis, 
Heterolepidotus, and Ophiopsis) from the Upper Trias of 
Hallein, Austria. From K. K. montanistische Hochschule, 
Leoben. 

Mollusca. — Ordovician and Triassic Cephalopoda from 
Germany. From Mr. E. Mascke. 

Seventeen plaster casts of Ammonites from the Spiti 
Shales, Himalaya. From University of Vienna. 

A Carboniferous Coelonautilus ; a Kimmeridgian Ostrea ; 
three Ammonites and a Belemnite from Jurassic, Himalaya. 
From the Surveyors' Institution. 

Echinoderma. — Crinoid columnals from Jurassic, 
Himalaya. From the Surveyors' Institution. 

Plaster casts of type specimens of Plagiopygus daradensis 
and Galerites ahbreviata. From National Museum of Natural 
History, Paris. 



160 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Brachiopoda. — Eighteen Devonian Brachiopoda from 
Germany. From Senckenberg Museum, Frankfurt. 

Three Jurassic Brachiopoda from the Himalaya. From 
the Surveyors' Institution. 

Plantce. — A transverse section of stem of Lejndodendron 
onacconochiei. From Mr. R. Kidston, f.r.s. 



The total acquisitions are as follows : — 






A.— Vertebrata : 








By Donation 


- 


- 610 




,, Purchase 


_ 


- 274 




„ Exchange - 


_ 


74 











958 


B. — Invertebrata : 








By Donation 


_ 


- 1,639 




,, Purchase 


- - - 


- 3,016 




„ Exchange - 


_ _ _ 


- 160 











4,815 


C— Plants : 








By Donation - 


- 


11 




„ Purchase - 


- 


52 




,, Exchange - 


- 


1 


64 


D. —Rock speci^iens 






By Donation 


Acquisitions for 


2 


2 
5,839 


Total 


1906 = 



VIII. — Visitors and Students. 

The number of visits paid to the Department by students 
and other persons for the purpose of consultation or study 
during 1906 was 4,171. 



IX. — Lectures and Demonstrations. 

Nine parties were received in the Galleries of the 
Department of Geology, and demonstrations were given as 
follows : — 

January 27. — The Regent Street Polytechnic Natural 
History Society (30 members) ; by Dr. Andrews, 

February 17.— The Battersea Field Club (10 members); 
by Dr. Bather. 

March 10. — The Geologists' Association (51 members); 
by Dr. Woodward. 

March 24 — The West Kent Natural History, Microscopical, 
and Photographic Society (23 members); by Dr. Woodward. 

April 21. — The Ealing Scientific and Microscopical Society 
(20 members) ; by Dr. Woodward. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 161 

April 28.— The Hertfordshire Natural History Society 
(12 members) ; by Dr. Woodward. 

July 25. — The Iron and Steel Institute (20 members); 
by Dr. Woodward. 

November 10. — The Selborne Society (19 members) ; 
by Dr. Woodward. 

December 15. — The Regent Street Polytechnic Natural 
History Society (26 members) ; by Dr. Andrews. 

Arthur Smith Woodward. 



105. 



162 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Mineralogy. 
Research. 

In the course of the systematic crystallographic and 
chemical investigation of the Mineral Collection during the 
past year, the morphological and optical examination of the 
new red silver minerals from the Binnenthal has been con- 
tinued, crystals of zirkelite and baddeleyite from Ceylon and 
of ilmenite from Brazil have been measured and described, 
and a new mineral from Italy containing tantalum, niobium, 
and titanium has been analysed. Collections of minerals 
from German East Africa, Bolivia, and Spain have also been 
examined and described. 

Crystallographic measurements have been incidentally 
made on various other species, including apatite, atacamite, 
calamine, caracolite, chrysoberyl, corundum, dyscrasite, 
hausmannite, marrite, mispickel, phosgenite, prehnite, quartz, 
vivianite, and zircon. 

The whole of the collection of faceted gem-stones has 
been reviewed, and the refractivity, double refraction, 
pleochroism, and dispersion of many of them have been 
studied. 

A diagram has been drawn in order to facilitate the 
determination of refractive indices by the method of minimum 
deviation. 

The petrographical and chemical investigation of the 
rock- specimens collected by the "Discovery " Antarctic Ex- 
pedition has been completed, in which connexion seven 
quantitative chemical analyses of rocks have been made, the 
series of over 300 thin slices has been re-examined, and a 
detailed report has been prepared. The manuscript of 
Mr. H. T. Ferrar's report on the Field-geology has also been 
revised. The work of preparing for the printer these two 
reports, which are illustrated by 72 text figures and 
10 plates, has been completed. 

In the chemical laboratory complete quantitative analyses 
have been made of seven rock-specimens from Antarctic 
regions, a new mineral containing rare earths from Italy, a 
specimen of binnite from the Binnenthal containing a large 
percentage of zinc, and a specimen of semseyite from Bolivia. 
Further many doubtful minerals have been qualitatively 
analysed. 

Puhlications. 

New editions of the " Introduction to the Study of 
Minerals" and of the " Guide to the Mineral Gallery" have 
been completed and passed through the press. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 163 

The following papers, relative to specimens in the collec- 
tion, or to mineralogical theory and method, have been 
published in the *' Mineralogical Magazine and Journal of the 
Mineralogical Society" or the " Philosophical Magazine," by 
members of the staff of the Department. 

Dundasite from North Wales : by G. T. Prior, M.A., D.sc, 

F.G.S. 

Phenacite and other minerals from German East Africa : 
by L. J. Spencer, M.A., f.g.s. 

Paratacamite, a new oxy chloride of copper : by G. F. 
Herbert Smith, M.A,, F.G.S., with a chemical analysis by 
G. T. Prior, M.A., D.sc, F.G.S. 

On the method of minimum deviation for the determina- 
tion of refractive indices, with a diagram : by G. F. Herbert 
Smith, M.A., F.G.S. ; ; 

The general determination of the optical constants of a 
crystal by means of refraction through a prism : by G. F. 
Herbert Smith, M.A., f.g.s. 

Miscellaneous. 

The preparation of slip-catalogues of species, the re- 
labelling of the specimens, and the entry in the General 
Register of old specimens hitherto bearing numbers referring 
only to special catalogues have been continued. For the 
native elements contained in cases 1 and 2 this work has 
now been completed, and the exhibited specimens have been 
entirely re-arranged in the case-tops on re-polished trays. In 
this connexion the specimens of native iron from Greenland 
have been weighed, identified, and labelled. A slip index of 
donations acquired previous to 1837 (when the General 
Register was commenced) has alsp been prepared. 

The reserve collections of pyrites, marcasite, molybdenite, 
stibnite, copper-pyrites, fluor,, albite, petalite, anglesite, 
gypsum, and barytes have been extended and re-arranged in 
seventeen cubes of new drawers, and in the old drawers thus 
set free other species have been expanded. 

Several sets of shelves in the chemical laboratory have 
been converted into cupboards with glazed doors, and the 
large bookcase in the balance-room has been similarly 
protected. 

Numerous specimens sent for identification or brought to 
the Museum by visitors have been examined and named. 

Eighty-six boxes or parcels of mineral specimens have 
been received, unpacked, and examined ; fifty-eight boxes or 
parcels have been packed and despatched. 

Two hundred and twenty-one thin slices of rocks and 
seven of meteorites have been prepared. 

L 2 



164 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Departmental Library. 

To the Departmental Library have been added continua- 
tions of 29 periodicals (in 399 parts), 102 volumes of separate 
works, 105 pamphlets and parts or works, 2 maps, and 
20 mining reports ; of these, 9 periodicals (in 122 parts), 
11 volumes of separate works, G8 pamphlets, and all the 
mining reports were acquired by presentation or transfer. 
All of them, including 699 plates, have been registered and 
stamped. 

Students. 

The number of visits recorded as made to the Department 
for the purposes of consultation or study is 867. 

The Gallery being no longer reserved on particular days 
of the week for use by students, and study-series having 
been so arranged as to be directly accessible to the public, 
and so labelled as to render reference to the staff for informa- 
tion thereon almost completely unnecessary, it has become 
difficult to distinguish, for statistical purposes, "Students" 
of minerals from ordinary " Visitors," and stress cannot 
longer be laid on the distinction. 

Exchanges. 

Exchanges of specimens have been made with Dr. A. 
Brezina, of Vienna ; Dr. L. H. Borgstrom, of Helsingf ors ; 
Mr. A. 0. Watkins, of Perth, Western Australia ; and 
Mr. G. T. Holloway, of London. 

Accessions. 

920 specimens have been acquired, namely : — 

438 minerals, 475 rocks, and 7 meteorites. All of them 
have been registered, numbered, and incorporated with the 
Collection. 

The more important of them are as follows : — 

Minerals. 
By Presentation : - 

A collection of Japanese minerals, including scorodite, 
fine crystals of axinite, topaz, hedenbergite, and danburite : 
by Prof. T. Wada. 

Faceted alexandrite, sphene, garnets, opals, and other 
gem-stones : by E. Hopkins, Esq. 

A glass model of the la.rge " Cullinan" diamond : by the 
Premier (Transvaal) Diamond Mining Co. 

Tantalite crystals from Western Australia : by W. M. 
Foote, Esq. 

Cassiterite, amblygonite, and pyrophyllite, from Caceres, 
Spain : by G. P. Ashmore, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOGY. 165 

Twinned crystals of cinnabar from China : by R. L. 
Pocock, Esq. 

Covellite in fluor, from Cornwall : by H. Bauerman, Esq. 

A ^roup of quartz-crystals enclosing tufts of gothite, 
from Priddy, Mendip Hills : by Spencer G. Perceval, Esq. 

Monazite-sand, cassiterite, and crystals of thorianite from 
Ceylon : by Dr, A. K. Coomaraswamy. 

Artificial crystals of gold, and specimens of axinite from 
Cornwall : by Dr. R. Pearce. 

Monazite from La Grave, Oisans, France : by F. N. A. 
Fleischmann, Esq. 

Specimens of sodalite from Dungannon, Canada : by 
A. Lee, Esq. 

Specimens of nickel and cobalt ores from Nipissing 
District, Canada ; by the Canadian Government through 
R. L. Broadbent, Esq. 

By Exchange : 
Wolfram and stibiotantalite from Australia. 

By Purchase : 

A series of rare minerals from the Binnenthal, including 
baumhauerite, bowmanite, lengenbachite, seligmannite, and 
trechmannite. 

An exceptionally large, clear green crystal of euclase, a 
large quartz crystal enclosing needles of rutile, twinned 
crystals of rutile, and fibrous baddeleyite, from Brazil. 

A peculiar fibrous variety of astrophyllite with fine 
crystals of catapleiite, from Greenland. 

Magnificent crystals of rubellite, and clear, colourless, 
doubly terminated crystals of beryl, from California. 

An extremely large crystal of monazite, from Tvedestrand, 
Norway. 

A large mass of pitchblende, from Joachim sthal, Bohemia. 

A series of specimens from the collection of the late 
Prof. A. A. Damour : including romeite from Piedmont, 
hureaulite from Hte. Vienne, crystals of chrysoberyl from 
Brazil, and plumbogummite from Huelgoat, Brittany. 

Fine specimens of mercury minerals from Texas, including 
montroydite, kleinite, calomel, and eglestonite. 

Extremely large crystals of phosgenite, from Sardinia. 
Unusually fine twinned crystals of cinnabar, fiom China. 

Fine groups of crystals of cabrerite, from Laurium, 
Greece. 

A large crystal of tantalite, from Western Australia. 
A fine crystal of dyscrasite, from Andreasberg, Harz. 



166 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The following names added to the Museum List were 
previously not represented by specimens in the Collection : — > 

Kallilite, kleinite, kornelite, naegite. 



Rocks. 
By Presentation : 

A small collection of rock-specimens from East Africa 
(Kilimandjaro, &c.) : by Prof. A. Lacroix. 

Pebbles of quartz-porphyry from St. Florent, Corsica; 
by Dr. C. I. Forsyth Major. 

Specimens of volcanic dust and lava from the eruption 
of Vesuvius in April 1906 : by Prof. W. J. Lewis and by 
H. Boulton, Esq., M.v.o. 

Specimens of blue ground from Kimberley : by J. H. 
Gardiner, Esq. 

Perlitic obsidian from the island of Melos; by H. D. 
Acland, Esq. 

Spherulitic obsidian from Tesco, Hungary : by W. H. 
Shrubsole, Esq. 

.Specimens from Tierra, del Fuego: by Capt. R. Crawshay. 

By Purchase : 

'!' ^ A collection of 385 specimens of rocks from the Simplon 
Tunnel. 

A large polished slab of orbicular gabbro from California. 

Specimens of lava and volcanic ash from the eruption of 
Vesuvius in April 1906. 

A collection of I'ock-specimens from Cornwall and Devon. 

Meteorites. 
• u '- By Presentation : 

Caperr, Patagonia ; a slice weighing 256 grams : by the 
Director of the La Plata Museum, Brazil. 

Dokachi, India ; pieces weighing 593| grams and 28^ 
grams respectively : by the Director of the Geological Survey 
of India. 

Albuquerque (probably Glorieta Mountain), New Mexico ; 
a piece weighing 1,000 grams : by Dr. R. Pearce. 

By Exchange : i.^ .,j ,4., , 

Mem, Denmark ; fell August 29, 1878 ; a fragment 
weighing 39 grams. 

Thin slices of Hvittis, Bjurbole, and Shelburne. 



DEPARTMENT OF MINERALOaY. 167 

By Purchase : 

Oficina Angelos, Chili ; a piece weighing 1,480 grams. 

Ilimaes, Desert of Atacama ; a slice weighing 266^ grams 
(perhaps identical with that of Imilac). 

Estacado, Texas ; found in 1902 : a slice weighing 
17,103 grams. 

Those Meteorites of which the names are italicized belong 
ta falls hitherto unrepresented in the Museum Collection. 

L. Fletcher. 



168 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BEITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Botany. 

I. — Arrangement and Conservation. 

During the past year 23,525 specimens, consisting of 
17,475 Flowering Plants, 1,880 Vascular Cryptogams, 128 
Mosses, 36 Hepatics, 2,464 Lichens, 370 Algse, and 1,172 
Fungi, have been mounted and incorporated with the 
Herbarium. 

Flowering Plants. — Collections have been mounted and 
incorporated as follows : — Dr. Hassler's collection from Para- 
guay (in part), Rev. Urban Faurie's collection from Japan, 
Korea, and Formosa, (in part), Mr. Forbes's collection, mainly 
from China, collections from West Australia by Drummond, 
from Tasmania by Gunn and Milligan, and from South 
Africa by Dr. Schlechter and Dr. Penther. Collections from 
Rhodesia by Mr. Eyles, Mr. Swynnerton, and Miss Gibbs, 
from Uganda by Dr. Bagshawe, from Somaliland by Mr. Bury, 
and from the African Lakes by Dr. W. C. Cunnington have 
been wholly or in part named, mounted, and incorporated. 
Dr. Patrick Russell's Aleppo plants and the collections made 
by Banks and Solander in Polynesia and New Zealand have 
been in part identified and collated with recent literature. 

In the division Polypetala^ the South African collections 
of Zeyher have been incorporated, and additions have also 
been made by incorporation especially in the orders Caryo- 
phyllacese (South African specimens), Meliacese, Burseracese, 
Guttiferse (specimens from Herb. Miers), and Cactacese. The 
genera Mesemhryanthemum, Drosera, Hircea, and Mas- 
cagnia have been re-arranged, and the North American Saxi- 
fragacese have been revised by recent monographs. Work 
of revision has also been done on the orders Haloragese, 
Sarraceniace^, and the Indian species of Nymphoia ; and 
the genus Bersama has been monographed. In the division 
Gamopetalse the order Primulacese has been re-arranged 
according to recent monographs, and work of identification 
and revision has been done on Compositse and Acanthacese 
from Madagascar. Collections made in Uganda by Dr. Bag- 
shawe and in Rhodesia by Mr. Eyles have been worked out 
and the novelties described and published. 

In the division Apetala3 work of incorporation has been 
done in the orders Euphorbiacese and Urticacese, and work of 
revision and arrangement on the Urticacese of tropical Africa 
and on the orders Podostemacese and Nepenthacese. 

In the Monocotyledons work of incorporation has been 
done chiefiy in the orders Orchidacese, Cyperacese, and 
Graminese. Work of revision has been done on the Rhode- 
sian Liliaceae, and work of revision and re-arrangement in 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 169 

several genera of Orchids, and the section Pothoidese of the 
order Aracese. 

In the Gymnosperms various collections have been incor- 
porated, and work of revision has been done on the genera 
P^Viddringtonia, Callitris, and others. 

Some time has been devoted to sorting and selecting, 
preparatory to incorporation, an accumulation of collections, 
chiefly Australian ; and to the arrangement of Chinese and 
South African duplicates for purposes of exchange. 

Ferns. — The plants of several collections have been laid 
out and incorporated in the general series, including collec- 
tions from West China (Wilson), Paraguay (Hassler), Central 
America and West Indies (various), and Wirtgen's critically 
named forms of Equisetacese. Outstanding material of 
various genera of the Gleicheniacese, Cyathese, Dicksoniese, 
Hymenophyllese, and of Pteris and Selaginella has been 
incorporated. The genera Anemia and Asplenium (in part) 
have been revised and re-arranged. 

Bryophyta. — In the Mosses the genus Ptychomitrium and 
some of the genera of Hookeriese, Entodontese, and Bryese 
have been partly revised. In the Hepatics most of the 
British genera have been revised and the collections of Davies 
and Pearson arranged according to Pearson's Monograph. 

Algce. — The Codiacese and the genera Oelidium, Ptero- 
cladia, and Chondrus have been revised and re-arranged, as 
have also in part the genera Dictyota, Padina, Laminaria, 
Macrocystis, Sarcophycus, and others. The Chlorophycese of 
Ferguson's Ceylon Algse have been revised and re-arranged. 
The original drawings and plates of Sowerby's English 
Botany have been re-arranged. The prepared diatomaceous 
deposits of the Comber collection have been put in order and 
the MSS. arranged and collated with the microscopic slides. 
The general series of microscopic slides has been examined 
and repaired where necessary. Collections from New South 
Wales and from the Indian Ocean have been determined, and 
several collections of British seaweeds have been named, The 
outstanding material of the Characese has been in part 
determined. 

Fungi. — The large collection of the late William Phillips 
has been purchased, and all the British specimens belonging 
to the Basidiomycetes, Uredineae, Pyrenomycetes, Sphserop- 
sidese, Hyphomycetes, and Phycomycetes have been separated 
and incorporated in the British series. The North American 
Uredinese of the published sets of Ellis and Everhart, Arthur 
and Holway, Cummings, Williams and Seymour, Griffiths, 
Kellerman and Swingle, Seymour and Earle, have been incor- 
porated in the general series. The British Uredinese have 
been further revised, re-arranged, and supplemented. 



170 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Licheiis. — Large collections of these plants, acquired from 
Crombie and Phillips, have undergone a preliminary sorting 
and labelling and, .together with the herbaria of Davies, 
Piggot, and others, are gradually being examined and incor- 
porated in the British series. Special attention has been 
given to the revision and re-arrangement of the large genus 
Lecidea. The pamphlets and MSS. received with the Crombie 
collection have been put in order. The original drawings 
and plates of Sowerby's English Botany have been re-arranged. 
The extra-British lichens of the Phillips collection have been 
put in order preparatory to incorporation. 

Exhibition Series. — Representations of the Schizomycetes 
and Characese have been added to the general systematic series, 
the Cycads and Bennettitese have been in part re-arranged, 
and various specimens have been added in different groups, 
including a fine series of fruits of Lodoicea sechellarurri 
(Double Coco-nut), stems of a Tree-fern illustrating structure, 
and a fine specimen of a new species of Algae, Leasonio. grandi- 
folia, from the coast of Victoria-land in the Antarctic circle. 
A series of British Characese has been added to the exhibi- 
tion of British plants, and progress has been made with the 
exhibition of a series of British Lichens, and in the selection 
of material for an exhibition of British Hepatics ; specimens 
with drawings of a British hybrid Ophrys have been exhibited. 
A guide to the case illustrating the History of Classification 
has been prepared and printed, and a Catalogue of the British 
Seed-plants has been prepared. Considerable progress has 
been made in the exhibition illustrating British trees in the 
Central Hall ; and some time has been devoted to the com- 
pletion of the case illustrating the flower in the group 
Dicotyledons. A series of historical events with dates has 
been painted on the large section of the " Big Tree " {Sequoia 
gigantea). 



II. — Publications. 

The following publications relating to the collections and 
work of the Department have appeared : — 

Guide to Books and Portraits illustrating the History of 
Plant Classification exhibited in the Department of Botany. 
By Dr. Rendle. Official publication. 

New Monocotyledons from China and . Tibet. By 
Dr. Rendle. (Journal of Botany.) 

Widdringtonia in South Tropical Africa. By Dr. Rendle. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

A new Celtis from Tropical Africa. By Dr. Rendle . 
(Journal of Botany.) 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANT. 171 

International Rules of Botanical Nomenclature adopted 
by the Botanical Congress at Vienna, 1905. English edition 
by Dr. Rendle. 

Note on Farsetia stylosa. By Mr. Britten. (Journal of 
Botany.) 

Hardwicke's Botanical Drawings. By Mr. Britten. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

Silene bella E. D. Clarke. By Mr. Britten. (Journal of 
Botany.) 

" Botany in England." By Mr. Britten. (Journal of 
Botany.) 

British Forms of Helosciaduni nodiflorwin Koch. By 
Mr. Baker (with Rev. H. J. Riddelsdell). (Journal of 
Botany.) 

African Indigoferas. By Mr. Baker. (Journal of 
Botany. ) 

New Rubiacese from British East Africa II. By 
Mr. Spencer Moore. (Journal of Botany.) 

New or rare Gamopetalse from Tropical Africa. By 
Mr. Spencer Moore. (Journal of Botany.) 

Uganda Gamopetalse from Dr. Bagshawe. ■ By Mr. 

Spencer Moore. (Journal of Botany.) 

Sertulum Mascarense. By Mr. Spencer Moore. (Journal 
of Botany). 

Second Contribution to the Flora of Africa. Rubiaceae 
and Compositse II. By Mr. Spencer Moore. (Journal of 
Linnean Society.) 

The Dates of Hooker's " British Jungermannise " and 
" Musci Exotiei." By Mr. Gepp. (Journal of Botany.) 

Some Marine Algae from New South Wales. By Mr. and 
Mrs. Gepp. (Journal of Botany.) 

A new species of Lessonia. By Mr. and Mrs. Gepp. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

Muscinese and Algse in Mr. H. N. Ridley's "An Expedi- 
tion to Christmas Island." By Mr. and Mrs. Gepp. (Journal 
Straits Branch Royal Asiatic Society.) 

British Coenogoniaceae. By Miss A. Lorrain Smith. 
(Journal of Botany.) 

A Contribution to the Botany of Southern Rhodesia. 
By Miss L. S. Gibbs (including determinations and descrip- 
tions by Dr. Rendle, Mr. E. G. Baker, and Mr. Spencer 
Moore). (^Journal of Linnean Society.) 



172 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

III. — Exchanges of Duplicates. 

Exchanges have been effected with the Royal Botanic 
Museum, Berlin; the Hofmuseum, Vienna; the Botanic 
Museum, Zurich ; the Botanic Gardens, Sydney ; the Botanic 
Gardens, Singapore ; the Bureau of Agriculture, Manila ; the 
Cakes Ames Botanical Laboratory, Massachusetts, U.S.A. ; 
and Dr. Harry Bolus of Cape Town. 

IV. — Loan of Specimens. 

Specimens, mainly undetermined, have been lent as 
follows : — 130 specimens of Characese to Henry Groves, Esq. ; 
14 specimens of Potaniogeton, chiefly Japanese, to Arthur 
Bennett, Esq. ; one specimen of Triuridacese to W. Botting 
Hemsley, Esq., of the Royal Gardens, Kew ; one specimen of 
Osmundites from New Zealand to R. Kidston, Esq. ; and a 
drawing of Gossypium to Sir George Watt. 

The specimens have been duly returned in good condition, 
accompanied by determinations and valuable notes. 

V. — Departmental Library. 

The additions during the past year have been, by donation, 
72 volumes, 339 pamphlets ; by purchase, 120 volumes, 2 
pamphlets— in all 192 volumes, 341 pamphlets. These include 
18 periodicals, in 150 parts, presented, and 73 periodicals, in 
629 parts, purchased — in all 91 periodicals in 779 parts. 

137 volumes have been bound, and 8 volumes of plates 
illustrating Cook's first voyage have been re-arranged and 
re-bound. The classification and arrangement for binding of 
the large collection of notes and drawings by R. A. Salisbury 
has been nearly completed, and original drawings of several 
collections have been written up. A collection of MSS. by 
Robert Brown and other botanists and collectors of the early 
nineteenth century has been sorted and arranged. 



YI. — Acquisitions. 

The following additions have been made to the collections 
by presentation : — 100 Phanerogams from the Director of the 
Royal Botanic Gardens, Sibpur, Calcutta; fruits of Lodoicea 
sechellarum, from J. Stanley Gardiner, Esq. ; 468 Phane- 
rogams from Uganda, from Dr. A. G. Bagshawe ; specimens 
illustrating the life-history of Crocus for the Public 
Gallery and a species of Statice from E. A. Bowles, Esq. ; 
20 specimens of Polygala amarella, illustrating variation, 
from J. Cryer, Esq. ; 3 Phanerogams from India, from Dr. T. 
Cooke ; 3 specimens of cultivated plants and 3 enlarged 
photographs, from Hon. Walter Rothschild, M.P. ; 126 
Phanerogams and 7 Cryptogams from Jamaica, from Dr. N. 
L. Britton ; 109 Phanerogams and 1 Cryptogam from South 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 173 

Rhodesia, from Miss L. Gibbs ; 22 Phanerogams from South 
Africa and Rhodesia, from H. T. Crosfield, Esq. ; 208 Phanero- 
gams from South Rhodesia, from Fred. Eyles, Esq. ; 8 culti- 
vated plants from Walter Ledger, Esq. ; 6 photographs of 
fossil fruits of Najas and Zannichellia, from Clement Reid, 
Esq. ; 7 Phanerogams from Tropical Africa, from Dr. Engler ; 
10 photographs of Rubber Forests on Amazon, from H. E. 
Weaver, Esq., M.I. C.E. ; 272 Phanerogams, 15 Cryptogams, 
and 28 Fruits from South Rhodesia, from C. F. M. Swynner- 
ton, Esq. ; 261 Phanerogams and 7 Cryptogams from Mt. 
Ruwenzori, collected by Dr. Wollaston, from the subscribers 
to the Ruwenzori Expedition ; 9 Phanerogams from South 
Europe, from H. Stuart Thompson, Esq. ; 3 Phanerogams 
and 7 Cryptogams from British East Africa, from A. 
Cholmley, Esq. ; 4 specimens of cultivated plants, from 
T. O'Brien, Esq. ; 66 Phanerogams and 4 Cryptogams from 
Shan States, from S. A. Durie, Esq. ; 2 reproduced copies of 
Roslin's portrait of Linnaeus, from W. Carruthers, Esq. ; 
50 European Lichens, from the Council of the Linnean 
Society ; 47 Japanese Mycetozoa, from K. Minakata ; an 
apochromatic microscope -objective, from Lady Sendall ; a 
large specimen of Laminaria from the Eastern Telegraph 
Company's cable near Gibraltar, from V. K. Cornish, 
Esq. ; 24 Marine Algae from Sydney, N.S.W., from A. H. 
Lucas, Esq. ; portraits of Elias Fries and J. G. Agardh, 
from G. Murray, Esq. ; Marine Algae and Mosses from the 
National Antarctic Expedition ; 54 Phanerogams and 9 
Cryptogams collected in the Great African Lakes by Dr. W. 
C. Cunnington, from the Tanganyika Committee through 
Professor Ray Lankester ; and single specimens from Prof. 
J. B. Farmer, Franklin White, Esq., and Herr Per Dusen. 

The additions to the British Herbarium by presentation 
have been : — 7 specimens of Fumaria from H. AY. Pugsley, 
Esq. ; 220 specimens from Rev. E. S. Marshall ; 72 specimens 
from Rev. H. J. Riddlesdell ; 15 specimens from C. E. Salmon, 
Esq. ; 49 specimens from G. C. Druce, Esq. ; 18 specimens 
from A. Bennett, Esq. ; 5 specimens from H. Stuart Thompson, 
Esq. ; 29 specimens from Prof. D. Oliver ; 80 specimens from 
Rev. E. F. Linton ; 60 species of Marine Algae from near 
Dover, from Miss G, E. M. Mitchell; 21 Hepaticae from 
Westmoreland, from W. H. Pearson, Esq. ; 2 Mosses and a 
Hepatic from W. R. Sherrin, Esq. ; and one or two specimens 
from W. R. Jefirey, Esq., W. H. Hammond, Esq., J. W. 
White, Esq., E. M. Holmes, Esq., A. B. Jackson, Esq., S. S. 
Buckman, Esq., H. R. Yates, Esq., Arthur Lister, Esq., Miss 
A. Lorrain Smith, C. P. Hurst, Esq., and Dr. W. H. Lang. 

Among the acquisitions by presentation special reference 
may be made to the Lichen-Herbarium of the late Rev. J, M. 
Crombie, presented by his widow, and containing about 
5,000 British and foreign Lichens, his MSS. and corre- 
spondence, and about 30 bound volumes of lichenological 
pamphlets by Nylander, J. Miiller, and other authors. 



174 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The following additions have been made by exchange of 
duplicates : — 136 specimens from South Africa from the 
Botanic Museum, Zurich, through Prof. Hans Schinz ; 6 speci- 
mens of Allophyllus from Tropical Africa, through Dr. Engler ; 
3 Violas from Texas and Mexico from the National Museum, 
Washington, through R. Rathbone, Esq. ; 33 Orchids and 
97 Cryptogams from the Oakes Ames Botanical Laboratory, 
North Eastern, Mass., U.S.A. ; 384 specimens from California 
from the University of Pennsylvania, through Prof. John 
Macfarlane; 240 specimens of Australian plants from J. H. 
Maiden, Esq. ; 96 specimens from North America from the 
Gray Herbarium, Cambridge, Mass., through Dr. B. L. 
Robinson ; 142 Phanerogams and 4 Cryptogams from South 
Africa collected by Penther and Krook, also 10 plates by 
Ferdinand Bauer, and Kryptogamae exsiccates, Cent, xii, xiii, 
from the Vienna Hofmuseum, through Dr. A.. Zahlbruckner ; 
249 Phanerogams and 30 Cryptogams from Botanic Gardens, 
Singapore, through H. N. Ridley, Esq. ; 150 Ferns collected 
in the Philippine Islands by E. P. Copeland, from the Bureau 
of Agriculture, Manila, through Prof. Elmer D. Merrill. 

The principal purchases during the year were : — 233 
Phaneroganis from Gunong Tahan, Pahang, from H. C. 
Robinson ; 200 specimens Flora Stiriaca Exsiccata, fasc. 3-6, 
from Hayek ; 233 specimens from West Indies, series III., 
1904-5, from A. H. Curtiss ; 96 specimens from Somaliland, 
from G. W. Bury ; 828 specimens from South Africa, Plantse 
Schlechterianse, from Dr. Loesener ; 33 specimens from 
California, from A. A. Heller ; 465 Phanerogams and 70 
Cryptogams from Selkirk, from Chas. Shaw ; 165 Phanero- 
gams and 39 Cryptogams from Bolivia, collected by Fiebrig, 
from Dr. R. Pilger ; 215 specimens, including 10 Cryptogams, 
from Siam, collected by Dr. Hosseus, from Dr. Wilms ; 1,000 
specimens, including 119 Cryptogams, from Yunnan, from 
Dr. Henry ; 763 specimens from Japan, from Rev. U. Faurie ; 
239 Microphotographs of wood structure, from Williams, 
Weale, &; Co. ; 200 specimens Fl. Carniolica, Cent. 7 and 8, 
collected by Paulin ; Gramineee Exsiccatse (Fasc. xix, xx), 
from Kneucker ; 50 specimens (Salicetum Exsiccatum, Fasc. i.) 
collected by ToepfFer, from Dulau & Co. ; 200 specimens 
(Batotheca Europsea, Fasc. i.-iv.) from H. Sudre ; " Wooden 
Rose" from Guatemala, from Rosenberg; 100 Fungi Im- 
perf ecti, from Kabat and Bubak ; 50 North American 
Algge, from Collins, Holden, and Setchell ; 150 Micro-Fungi, 
from Vestergren ; 50 Ascomycetous Fungi, from Rehm ; 
50 Fungi Selecti, from Jaap ; 100 Cryptogams of Germany, 
Austria, and Switzerland, from Migula ; 100 North American 
Fungi, from Bartholomew ; 50 Mosses of the Malay Archi- 
pelago, from Fleischer ; 100 Brazilian Fungi, from Ule ; 
100 Uredinese, from Sydow ; 170 Cryptogams of N.W. India, 
from Gollan ; 100 Saxon Fungi, from Krieger ; 12 pre- 
pared British Fungi, from Hartley- Smith ; 15 Water-colour 
Drawings of British Lichens for exhibition, from Highley. 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 175 

Among the acquisitions by purchase special mention 
should be made of the Cryptogamic Herbarium of the late 
William Phillips, containing about 10,000 British and exotic 
Fungi, 800 Lichens, 53 Algse, and 3,200 Drawings of Fungi. 

VII. — Demonstrations. 
Demonstrations on the collections have been given by 
Dr. Rendle to 27 members of the International Hybridisation 
Conference, August 3rd, and to 11 members of the Ealing 
Science Society, November 3rd. 

VIII. — Students and Visitors. 
The number of visits to the Department for consultation 
and research during the year was 2,065, Numerous specimens 
and small collections have been named by the staff for 
visitors and correspondents. 

A. B. Rendle. 



BRITISH MUSEUM. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 18 February 1908 ;-/o)-, 

COPY " of Account of the Income and Expenditure of 
the British Museum (Special Trust Funds) for 
the Year ending the 31st day of March 1908 ; and, 
Return of the Number of Persons admitted to visit 
the Museum and the British Museum (Natural 
History) in each Year from 1902 to 1907, both Years 
inclusive ; together with a Statement of the Progress 
made in the Arrangement and Description of the 
Collections, and an Account of Objects added to 
them in the Year 1907." 



''ToTpr^Sn C.HOBHOUSE. 



{Mr. Trevelyan.) 



Ordered^ by The House of Commons, to he Printed, 
30 April 1908. 



LONDON: 
PRINTED FOR HIS MAJESTY'S STATIONERY OFFICE, 

By eyre and SPOTTISWOODE, Ltd., 
printees to the king's most excellent majesty. 



And to be purchased, either directly or through any Bookseller, from 

WYMAN AND SONS, Ltd., Fetter Lane, E.C, and 

32, Abingdon Street, Westminster, S.W. ; or 

OLIVER AND BOYD, Tweeddale Court, Edinburgh 

E, PONSONBY, 116, Grafton Street, Dublin. 



or 



131. 




7 AUG. 1908 <1 



[ 'i ] 



CONTENTS 



Page 
L— ACCOUNT OF THE KECEIPTS AND EXPENDITUKE OF 
THE BRIDGEWATEK FUND, for the Year ended 31st 
March 1908 4 

II.— ACCOUNT OF THE FARNBOROUGH FUND, for the same 

period .,.4 

III.— ACCOUNT OF THE SWINEY FUND, for the same period - 6 

IV.-ACCOUNT OF THE BIRCH FUND, for the same period - - 6 

V.-ACCOUNT OF THE BEQUEST OF THE LATE MR, VINCENT 

STUCKEY LEAN for the same period . . - - . g 

VI.— ACCOUNT OF THE BEQUEST OF THE LATE MR, CHARLES 

DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM for the same period - - 8 

VIL— RETURN of the Number of Persons admitted to visit the 
British Museum and the British Museum (Natural 
History) in each Year from 1902 to 1907, both Years 
inclusive -- -]C 

VIII.— STATEMENT of General Progress at the Museum (Blooms- 
bury) 16 

IX. — STATEMENT of Progress made in the arrangement and 
Description of the Collections, and Account of Objects 
added to them, in the Year 1907 (Bloomsbury)- - - - 20 

X.— Ditto . - - ditto - ' - (Natural History) - - - 96 



A 2 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



I,— AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditure of the 



To Balances on the 1st April 1907 - 

- Dividends received on 13,150Z. 13s. lOd. 
Stock in 2J per Cent. Consols, 
bequeathed by the Earl of Bridge- 
water, viz. : 

On the 5th April 1907 £.82 3 10 

5th July 1907 - 82 3 10 

„ 5th October 1907 - 82 3 10 

5th January 1908 - 82 3 10 



- Rent of a Reai, Estate, Whitchurch, 

bequeathed by the Earl of Bridgewater 
(less cliarges of collection, repairs, &c.) - 

- Net Pkoceeds op Sale of land and cottages, 

part of Whitchurch Estate (Bridgewater 
Bequest) - - - - 



Stock purchased as pei' contra 



£. 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 
50 15 - 



328 15 4 
17 4 8 

370 7 3 



(67 2 3 



Stock, 
2^ °/o Consols 



£. s. d. 
13,150 13 10 



447 10 1 



13,598 3 11 



II.— AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expendituee of the 



To Balances oq the 1st April 1907 - - - 

- Dividends received on 2,879/. 10*. Id. Stock 
in 2J per Cent. Consols, be- 
queathed by Lord Farnborough, 
viz.: 

On the 5th April 1907 £.17 19 11 

„ 5th July 1907 - 17 19 11 

„ 5th October 1907 • 17 19 11 

„ 5th January 1908 • 17 19 11 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 
305 8 11 



71 19 8 



377 8 7 



Stock, 
2i °/o Consols. 



£. s. d. 

2,879 10 7 



2.879 10 7 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM, 



BRIDGEWATER FUND, from the 1st April 1907 to the 31st March 1908 

Cash, 



By One Year's Salary of the Egerton Librarian - 

- Amount expended on Fencing, &c,, for Whit- 

church Property . . - - 

- PUECHASE of 447^. 10.S-. 1^. Stoclc Consols 



Balances on the 31st" March 1908, 
carried to Account for 1908-1909 



175 



d. 



50 12 5 
370 7 3 



171 2 7 



767 2 3 



Stock, 
2^ °/o Consols. 



&. s. 



13,598 3 11 



13,598 3 11 



FARNBOROUan FUND, from the 1st April 1907 to the 31st March 1908. 



By Amount expended on purchase of Manuscript - 

- Balances on the 31st March 1908, 
carried to Account for 1908-1909 



Cash, 



£. s. d. 

251 2 - 

126 6 7 



£. 377 8 7 



Stock, 
2^ % Consols. 



&. s. A. 



2,879 10 7 



J,879 10 7 



ACCOUNTS. ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



III.~AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts and Expenditure of the 





Cash. 


Stock, 
2i °/o Consols. 






£. s, d. 


£. s. d. 




To Balances on the 1st April 1907 - 


52 1 b 


5,683 1 6 




- Dividends received on 5,683/. Is. 6d. Stock 
in 2^ par Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by Dr. George Swiney for Lectures 
on Geology, viz. : 








On the 5th April 1907 - £. 35 10 4 








„ 5th July 1907 - 35 10 4 








5th October 1907 - 35 10 4 








„ 5th January 1908 - 35 10 4 


142 1 4 










£. 


194 8 9 5,683 1 6 

1 





IV__-AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of 





Cash, 


Stock, 
2i°/o Consols. 






£. s. d. 






To Balance on the 1st April 1907 


— 


565 3 9 




- Dividends received on 565/. 3*. 9^. Stock in 
2i per Cent. Consols, bequeathed 
by Dr. Birch in 1786, for the three 
Under Librarians of the British 
Museum, viz. : 








On the 5th April 1907 - £. 3 10 8 








5th July 1907 - 3 10 8 








5th October 1907 - 3 10 8 








., 5th January 1908 - 3 10 8 


14 2.8 










£. 


14 2 8 


565 3 9 





ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



SWINEY FUND, from the 1st April 1907 to the 31st March 1908. 



Cash. 



By Amount paid to Prof. J. Cossar Ewart, for 
Lectures on Geology in 1907 



Balances on the SIst March 1908, 
carried to Account for 1908-1909 



£. 6-. d. 
140 - - 



54 8 9 



£. 194 



Stock, 
2^ °/o Consols. 



£. s. 



5,683 1 



6,683 1 6 



the BIRCH FUND, from the 1st April 1907 to the 31st March 1908. 





By Legacy paid to the three Under Librarians 
of the British Museum, whose offices 
existed in 1766, viz., the Keepers of the 
Departments of Printed Books, Manu- 
scripts and Natural History 

- BALANCE ON THE 31ST MARCH 1908, 

carried to Account for 1908-1909 

£. 


Cash. 


Stock, 
2i% Consols. 




£. s. d. 

14 2 8 


A. s d. 
565 3 9 




14 2 8 


565 3 9 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



v.— AN ACCOUNT of the Eeceipts arxd Expenditure of the bequest 
and Extension of the Library and Reading-room of the British 



To Amoukt of Local Loans Stock on 1st April 
1907 - . . . 

- Dividends received during the year - 

- Amdunt of Local Loans Stock purchased with 

tlie Dividends - - . 



£. 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 



1.615 6 9 



1,615 6 9 



Local Loans 
Stock. 



£. s. d. 

53,221 5 9 



1,682 13 8 



.54,903 19 5 



VI.—AN ACCOUNT of the Receipts and Expenditure of the bequest 

1st April 1907 to 





Cash. 


Metropolitan 
3^ \ Stock. 






£. s. d. 


£. s. d. 




To Amount of Metropolitan 3i per cent. Stock on 
lstAprill907 . . . . 


- 


7,558 11 7 




- Dividends received during the year 


268 - 1 






- Amount of Metropolitan 3^ per cent. Stock 
purchased with the Dividends - 


- 


265 17 - 




£. 


268 - 1 


7,824 8 7 





ACCOUKTS, £TC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



of the late MR. YINCENT STUCKEY LEAN (for the Improvement 
Museum) from the 1st April 1907 to the 31st March 1908. 



By Amount expended in the purchase of 
lfi82l. 13s. 8d. Local Loans Stock, Com- 
mission, &c. - - 



Balance of Stock on the 31st Maech 1908 
carried to account for 1908-1909 



Cash. 



£. s. d. 



1,615 6 9 



,615 6 



Local Loans 
Stock. 



£. *. 



54,903 19 5 



54,903 19 5 



of the late MR. CHARLES DRURY EDWARD FORTNUM from the 
the 31st March 1908. 



By Amount expended in the purchase of 
2651. 17 s. -d. Metropolitan 3^ per cent. 
Stock, Commission, &c. - _ - . 



Balance of Stock on the 3Ist Maech 1908 
carried to account for 1908-1909 



£. 



Cash. 



£. s. 



- 1 



268 



Meteopolitan 
3i °/o Stock. 



s'. d. 



7,824 



7,824 8 7 



^, Maunde Thompson^ 

Director and Principal Librarian. 



10 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



1 


1 

S3 

m 


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Co" cc" «r CO lo" t-" CO »0 t-T irt CO CO 


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t>'#oooo--ico»oint-r-irt 

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t-lOCOOOCOt-COt-CO-^IIMCO 




i 


a 
m 


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« 


a 

US 


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lOr— iC5L-^iX)(NOC005COCOrH 
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cq co' CO «o t-T icT >cr t>r lo" lo" ^" fN' 


CO 

o 


00 

1 


^1 


COCOC<|(Mt-C<lrt-*CO-*t~;;+i 

t-lOt--HOCOr-ICO-*-*<t-0 

(M r-i lo CO (M '^5_0_'0_^^>•__Cl^oo o 

rH~ co" OO" C<r lo" .-T Co" O" Co" CO" r-n" O-f 
COlOlOOOCOCOOOOSCOt-COt- 

1 


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(N (M" »0 lO" lO" Co" ic" l> »0 •* TiT (M 


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t- lo a> o o OO CO oo__(M^o o ^__ 
o' Qo" T-* (m" oo" go o" co" ^"^ co" -*" o~ 
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CO" 
00 


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ll|5S.§£.I|l11 


1 -^ 

B is 

111, 


p 

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ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



11 





M 


OO 




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o 


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o 


CO 


CO 






o 


t~ 


OO 


05 


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05 




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00 




00 


m 


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as 


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OS 


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in 


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t^ 


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^^ 


co^ 


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05 


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c<r 


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t- 


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CO 


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OO 






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12 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The British Museum, Bloomsbury (including the Depart- 
ments of Printed Books and Maps, Manuscripts, Oriental 
Printed Books and Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, 
Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities, Greek and Roman 
Antiquities, British and Mediseval Antiquities and Ethno- 
graphy, and Coins and Medals), is open to the public free 
daily (except on Good Friday and Christmas Day and days 
of Public Fast or Thanksgiving), as follows : — 



On Weekdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

After 4 p.m. in January, February, November, Decem- 
ber, and after 5 p.m. in March, September, October, only 
certain of the galleries remain open, viz. : — 



On Mondays f Exhibitions of Manuscripts, Printed 

Wednesdays' ^r^''.-^^i''*'r''^ ^J^Y^T'-^^i'^l^'?' 

, ( Glass & Majolica; Prehistoric, British, 

and Anglo-Saxon, Mediaeval and Ethno- 

Fridays I^ graphical Collections. 



On Tuesdays, f Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek and Roman 

Thursdays ' Gralleries (exclusive of the Vase Rooms 

, ' and Bronze Room); Gold Ornament 

^^ Room, American Collections, and the 

Saturdays Waddesdon Room. 



On Sunday Afternoons : — 

From 2 to 4 p.m. in January, February, November, 
December. 
„ 2 „ 5 „ „ October. 

„ 2 „ 5.30 „ „ March, September. 
„ 2 ,, 6 ,, „ April, May, June, July, August. 



Persons applying for the purposes of research and reference 
are admitted to the Reading Room under certain regulations 
every weekday, except the days specified below, from 9 a.m. 
until 7 p.m. The Newspaper Room is open, under similar 
regulations, from 10 a.m. until 4, 5, or 6 p.m., according to 
the season of the year. 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 13 

The Keading Room, Newspaper Eoom, and Students' Rooms 
in the Library and Department of Manuscripts are closed on 
Sundays, Good Friday, Christmas Day, and the first four 
weekdays in March and September. 

Other Students' Rooms are closed on Sundays, Good Friday, 
and Christmas Day, and occasionally for cleaning. 

Students are admitted generally to the several Departments, 
on weekdays, from 10 till 4 or 5 o'clock ; and to the Sculpture 
Galleries from 9 o'clock till the hour of closing, 

British Museum,) E. Maunde Thompson, 

31 March 1908./ Director and Principal Librarian. 



14 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



i^SS i 



»0 !0 ^ O CO CO 



00 '-T) lO O 'O iC: CO O) -f CO ■ 
C3-HC0(MS5OC31OVHt— li 
lOcrJOOCMOl— lOr-nOOl 






CO O (M 00 

r-H O C» ^ 



0005C500505t- 

iM-*^i^^eocit^ 

O^C0^05_CvJ_00^t--_t^ CO^ 

c<r c<r cq~ sT cT t>r oo" -tT 

co-^co-t^tMcocqcq 



CClO«Oi-HOl-OQO«OOCC 
CO-^Ot-OiiO-^Ot-OlOLO 



CDCOi— l^^i— lOOOOOq^l 



O \ I 



OOCO>-ICOOIDC5t^05CqO>0 
^ ^__ i-H_ -^^ ^__ aO__ -H^ i-i__ t-^ OJ^ C<1^ r-.^ 



■*(M(MiOC0C005-*CO!MC<)C0 



t-(M03cocoi^oo«r'i— I'*© 
cq_ o '"iH, oo_ oo_ oo_ o co_ 05_ i-<^ lo^ 05_ 



(M05-*l-^OTiH-H-<*^(M«500 

t- o O m oq_'* o; O^^ ^■^^'^ 
-h" (m" -* of oD~ i-T CO i-T (m" .-'" co" i>r 
(N<M(Mm(M-^coiocoeococo 



ioroc5ioTHOt-0"oc<)o?o 
t^ocqi-Hcct^ioiot^iMt^co 

oscDcqcot-i-iccc^t-ascit- 

















co-*»o »o 










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ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 15 

The Exhibition Galleries of the British Museum (Natural 
History), Cromwell Road, South Kensington, including the 
Departments of Zoology, Geology and Palaeontology, Miner- 
alogy, and Botany, are open to the public, free, daily, 
except Good Friday and Christmas Day, and days of Public 
Fast or Thanksgiving. 



The hours of Admission are as under : — 



On Weekdays, throughout the year from 10 a.m., in 

- to 



January - - - . 
February 1st to 14th 
February 15th to end 
March _ _ - . 
April to August 
September 

October - - - . 
November and December 



4 p.m. 

4.30 

5 

5.30 

6 

5.30 

5 

4 



also, on Mondays and Saturdays only, from the begin- 
ning of May to the middle of July, to S p.m., and from the 
middle of July to the end of August, to 7 p.m. 



On Sundays, in 

January - - _ 
February 1st to 14th 
February 15th to end 
March - _ _ 
April - - « 

May to August - 
September 

October _ - - 
November and December 



from 



2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2.30 

2 

2 

2 



to 



4 p.m. 

4.30 

5 

5,30 

6 

7 

5.30 

5 

4 



Persons are admitted to study in these Departments every 
weekdav from 10 till 4 o'clock. 



British Museum (Natural History), 1 E. Maunde Thompson, 
22 February 1908. j Director and Principal 

Librarian. 



16 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

VIII. — General Progress at the Museum, Bloomsbury. 

The number of visitors to the Museum during the year 
1907 was largely affected by the closing of the Reading Room 
for renovation. The total number of visits amounted to 
646,300, as against 691,950 in 1906 ; the number of visits on 
week-days being 582,779, a falling off as compared with 
634;212 in 1906, but, on the other hand, the Sunday visits 
rising to 63,521, as against 57,738 in the previous year. 

The Reading Room was closed for repair and renovation 
from the 15th April to the 31st October. It was therefore 
accessible to readers for only 139 days in the year. While 
the room was closed, temporary accommodation was provided 
in the North Library for about 150 readers daily, on 172 
days. The total number of visits by readers in the year was 
137,682, being a daily average of 442, as against a total of 
212,997, with a daily average of 702, in 1906. 

The number of visits of Students to particular Depart- 
ments (other than the Reading Room) in 1907 was 55,738, as 
against 55,513 in 1906. The variations of the numbers in the 
several Departments were not very great ; rising in some 
degree in the Newspaper Room and in the Departments of 
Manuscripts, Prints and Drawings, and British and Mediaeval 
Antiquities ; and falling in the Departments of Egyptian and 
Assyrian, and of Greek and Roman, Antiquities, and of 
Coins and Medals, as well as in the Galleries of Sculpture. 

The first contract for the erection of the British Museum 
Extension building in Montague Place, on the north side of 
the Museum, which was entered into in 1906 for the 
construction of the basement and sub-ground floor, was 
practically completed at midsummer. On the 27th June, His 
Majesty the King, accompanied by Her Majesty the Queen, 
laid the Foundation Stone of the new building, which, with 
the King's assent, will be named " King Edward the Seventh's 
Galleries." 

Provision having been made by the First Commissioner of 
His Majesty's Works for the renovation of the Reading 
Room, which had not been repainted or redecorated since it 
was first opened in 1857, the room was closed and placed in 
the hands of the contractors on the 15th April. It was 
re-opened to readers on the 1st November. The entire fabric 
was carefully examined and tested, and, where necessary, 
repaired. The iron-work, of which the room is largely con- 
structed, was found to have suffered no deterioration in the 
lapse of time, and scarcely a rivet had failed. The system of 
ventilation was thoroughly cleansed and improved in details. 
New electric wiring was installed. The backs of the book- 
cases round the room were closed in with sheet -iron ; a slight 
material, merely to exclude draughts, having originally been 
employed. The wood-work of the fixed desks and the 
furniture of the room generally were made good and re- 
polished. The floor was re-laid with cork-carpeting. The 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 17 

original scheme of decoration was not followed, the colours 
which were at first applied to details of the great dome not 
being repeated, but white paint and gold alone being em- 
ployed. The result has been a very great improvement of 
the light in the room. 

The arduous work of removing the books of reference 
from the Reading Room previous to the renovation, of 
revising the collection, of weeding out obsolete books and 
of replacing them by recent works and additions, and of re- 
filling the shelves after the renovation was completed, was 
punctually and successfully accomplished by the staff" of the 
Library. 

The stone-work of the steps of the North- West Staircase, 
which had become seriously worn, has been renewed. The 
rooms of the Department of Coins and Medals, the students' 
room of the Department of Prints and Drawings, the First 
and Third Egyptian rooms, and the American room have 
been repainted. The installation of electric fans, to improve 
the ventilation of the public galleries, has been extended. 

Early in the year excavations were carried out by 
Mr. D. G. Hogarth, for the Trustees, on a site at Asyut in 
Upper Egypt, granted for the purpose by the Egyptian Govern- 
ment. The result has been the acquisition of a large collection 
of miscellaneous antiquities, including a fair proportion of 
early examples. They are described below (pp. 51-53). 

Among the more important additions to the several 
Departments the following may be specially noticed : — 

The Department of Printed Books has added upwards of 
seventy works to its series of English books printed before 
1640 ; and has augmented the great collection of Incunabula, 
or books printed before the year 1501, by forty-five additional 
examples. Among the English books is an Indulgence of 
Pope Sixtus IV. printed by William Caxton in 1481. A 
collection of broadsides and pamphlets relating to the history 
of Scotland between the years 1644 and 1700 has also been 
acquired. 

The Department of Manuscripts has made the important 
purchase of a Latin Psalter, partially glossed in Anglo-Saxon, 
which was written in the South of England, perhaps at 
Canterbury, in the latter part of the 10th century ; together 
with a Lexicon Tironianum, containing the collection of 
Latin shorthand symbols the invention of which is attributed 
to M. Tullius Tiro, freedman of Cicero, also of the 10th 
century. To Mr. C. Fairfax Murray the Department is 
indebted for the gift of autographs of portions of two of 
William Morris's poems, "Sigurd the Volsung" and " The 
Earthly Paradise " ; and to the Rev. Charles Hargrove for 
the gift of the original correspondence of the poet Shelley 
with Elizabeth Hitchener in 1811-12. 

0.109. B 



18 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

The Department of Oriental Printed Books and Manu- 
scripts has purchased an important series of Coptic MSS. and 
a very rare Nubian MS., of Biblical and hagiological interest, 
of the 10th and 11th centuries ; and, among Arabic MSS., one 
of great rarity and age, written in a.d. 1039. 

In the Department of Prints and Drawings an acquisition 
of great interest is a collection of first sketches and studies 
by Tintoretto, the greater number painted in tempera and 
oil on paper. The series of Japanese woodcuts has also been 
augmented by a selection of upwards of three hundred 
examples acquired by purchase, and by an equal number the 
gift of Sir Hickman Bacon, and by others presented by Sir 
Ernest Satow and Mr. W. C Alexander. 

The Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities 
has acquired, in addition to the objects from Asyut referred 
to above, a collection of Egyptian antiquities, many being 
of the early periods, presented by the Egypt Exploration 
Fund ; and two good collections of Egyptian scarabs. To 
the Assyrian section have been added the bronze figure of, an 
Elamite king, inscribed, of the period 2,000 B.C. ; and an 
inscribed boundary stone of about 1,100 B.C. 

To the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities have 
been added a beautiful statue of a woman standing in an 
attitude of mourning, executed by a Greek sculptor late in 
the 4th century B.C., and two handsome Roman marble lavers, 
from the Duke of Sutherland's collections at Trentham Hall. 
A miniature bust, worked in plasma, of Agrippina the Elder 
is the gift of an anonymous donor. 

The Department of British and Mediaeval Antiquities has 
acquired a remarkable gold hoard, consisting of a number of 
bracelets of the Bronze Age, used as currency, which was 
discovered at Bexley in Kent ; and a fine specimen of 
Carlovingian carving in whale's bone, originally the cover 
of a casket. Among the gifts to the Department are : a 
cordoned bronze bucket, made in North Italy about the 7th 
century B.C., recently found at Weybridge and presented by 
Mr. William Dale ; a series of silver personal ornaments and 
ingots, from Kieff* in Russia, the gift of Mr. J. Pierpont 
Morgan ; and an ancient Mexican obsidian mask and mirror 
and a jadeite dagger presented by the Misses Thornton. 

Among the Greek coins acquired by the Department of 
Coins and Medals will be noticed several of great rarity ; 
and some interesting specimens have been added to the 
Anglo-Saxon and early English collection. A very important 
series of foreign " sterlings," imitations of the English silver 
penny, was bequeathed by Mr. Samuel Smith ; and some 
valuable foreign medals were given by Mr. Alfred de Pass 
and by Mr. Max Rosenheim. 

Gifts of Museum publications, including reproductions of 
prints and drawings by Old Masters, and sets of electrotypes 
of British Historical Medals, have been made to Free 



GENERAL PROGRESS AT THE MUSEUM. 19 

Libraries, Local Museums, and Art Schools throughout the 
United Kingdom, and to institutions in various Colonies. 

The following are the publications issued by the Depart- 
ments at Bloomsbury during the year : — 

The Sculptures and Inscription of Darius the Great on the 
Rock of Behistun in Persia. 1907. 8vo., 11. 

Catalogue of Finger Rings, Greek, Etruscan and Roman, 
in the British Museum. By F. H. Marshall, M.A. 1907. 
4to., 23s. 

Catalogue of Greek Papyri in the British Museum ; with 
Texts. Vol. III. 1907. 4to., 2/. 10s. 

Autotvpe Facsimiles of Greek Papyri in the British 
Museum." Vol. IIL 1907. FoL, Portfolio, 3L 3s. 

Catalogue of Additions to the Manuscripts in the British 
Museum in the years 1900-1905. 1907. 8vo., 1/. 10s. 

Reproductions from Illuminated Manuscripts. Series I. 
50 collotype plates. 1907. 4to., 5s. Series II. 50 collotype 
plates. 1907. 4to., 5s. 

Catalogue of the Pamphlets, Books, Newspapers, and 
Manuscripts relating to the Civil War, the Commonwealth, 
and Restoration, collected by George Thomason, 1640-1661. 
2 vols. 1908. 8vo., II. 10s. 

Medallic Illustrations of the History of Great Britain 
and Ireland. Part VI. Plates LI.-LX. Part VII. Plates 
LXI.-LXX. 1907. Folio, 6s. each part. 

Catalogue of Drawings by British Artists and Artists 
of foreign origin working in Great Britain. Vol. IV., S-Z. 
By L. Binyon. 1907. 8vo., 14s. 

Reproductions of Prints. Third Series. Part I. (Speci- 
mens of Etching by German Masters, 1475-1575). 25 plates. 
1907. 21. 

A Guide to the Exhibition Galleries of the British 
Museum (Bloomsbury). Seventh edition, revised. With plans. 
1907. 8vo., 2d. 

A Guide to the Mediaeval Room and to the Specimens of 
Mediaeval and Later Times in the Gold Ornament Room, 
With 14 plates and 194 illustrations. 1907. 8vo., Is. 6d. 

British Museum, E. Maunde Thompson, 

31 March, 1908. Director and Principal Librarian. 



B 2 



20 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

IX.—PROGRESS made in the Arrangement and 
Description of the Collect-ions, and Account 
OF Objects added to them in the Year 1907 
(Bloomsbury). 



Department of Printed Books. 

I. Arrangement. — The works added to the collection during 
the past year have, as far as possible, been placed on the 
shelves of the Library according to the system of classifica- 
tion adopted in the Museum. 

The press-marks, indicating their respective localities, have 
been marked on the inside and affixed to the back of each 
volume. 

The total number of these press-marks amounts to 
68,952 ; in addition to which 109,054 press-marks have been 
altered in consequence of changes and re-arrangements 
carried out in the Library ; 25,419 labels have been affixed 
to books and volumes of newspapers, and 130,965 obliterated 
labels have been renewed. 

The process of attaching third-marks to the books in the 
New Library, with the view of accelerating their delivery 
to readers, has been continued, and is now completed ; 
45,747 books have been thus marked during the year, and 
alterations to correspond, amounting to 192,188, have been 
carried out in the General and Hand Catalogues ; 3,047 index- 
slips have been written for London Newspapers. 

The number of stamps impressed upon the articles received 
has been 420,123. 

3,710 presses of books and newspapers have been dusted in 
the course of the year. 

II. Catalogues. — Cataloguing. — 46,311 titles have been 
written (the term "title" applying equally to a main-title 
and to a cross-reference) for the General Catalogue and for 
the Catalogues of Maps and Music. 

Printing. — 30,883 titles and 512 index-slips for the 
General Catalogue, 2,145 for the Map Catalogue, and 15,507 
for the Music Catalogue have been prepared for printing 
during the year; and 31,198 titles and 885 index-slips for the 
General Catalogue, and 2,145 for the Map Catalogue have 
been printed. 

Incorporation. — General Catalogue.— '30,698 title-slips 
and 870 index-slips have been incorporated into each of three 
copies of this Catalogue. This incorporation has rendered 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 21 

it necessary, in order to maintain as far as possible tlie 
alphabetical arrangement, to remove and re-insert 37,979 
title-slips and 399 index-slips in each copy and to add to each 
copy 812 new leaves. 

The system of fortnightly incorporation of accessions 
to the Library has been carried out with perfect regularity 
during the past year. 

Hand Catalogues. — The number of new entries made 
in the Hand Catalogue of " Academies " was 283 ; in that 
of " Periodical Publications," 355 ; in that of Maps and 
Charts, 415 ; in that of Music, 1,994 ; in that of London 
Newspapers, 3,047 ; and in that of Directories, 692. 

Map Catalogue. — 3,123 titles have been written for the 
Map Catalogue, and 2,914 title-slips have been incorporated 
into each of three copies of it. This incorporation has 
rendered it necessary to remove and re-insert 5,916 title-slips 
in each copy and to add to each copy 283 new leaves. 

Music Catalogue. — 12,221 titles have been written for 
the Music Catalogue, and 3,754 title-slips have been incorpo- 
rated into each of the two copies of it. This incorporation 
has rendered it necessary to remove and re-insert 7,320 title- 
slips in each copy of it and to add to each copy 111 new leaves. 

Shelf Catalogue. — For this Catalogue, in which the title- 
slips, mounted on cards, are arranged in order of press- 
marks, 38,400 have been so mounted and 101,000 have been 
incorporated in their proper order. 

Catalogues of Books of Reference in the Reading Room. 
— During the year the Books in the Reference Library have 
been rearranged, and many alterations and additions have 
been made in the collection. A Catalogue of the books on 
the ground-floor and in the two galleries of the Reading Room 
is now in preparation. 

III. Binding. — The number of volumes and sets of 
pamphlets sent to be bound in the course of the year was 
13,635, including 4,399 volumes of newspapers. In conse- 
quence of the frequent adoption of the plan of binding two 
or more volumes in one, the number of volumes returned 
was 10,820 ; in addition to which 122 volumes have been 
repaired in the binders' shops. 

Besides this, the following binding work has been done 
in the Library itself: — 7,663 volumes have been repaired, 
343 broadsides, &c., have been inserted in guard-books, and 
4,136 volumes of reports, parts of periodicals, &;c., have been 
bound in a light style of binding. 

The following maps, charts, &c., have also been bound or 
mounted during the year : — 77 atlases and 52 volumes of the 
25-inch Ordnance Survey have been bound ; 214 sheets of 
the 1-inch Ordnance Survey have been mounted on linen, 
and 299 Ordnance Survey Indexes on cards; in addition, 



22 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

299 maps have been mounted on linen, and 135 on cards, and 
2 portfolios, 2 cases, and 34 boxes have been made to contain 
maps. 

33,807 numbers of Colonial Newspapers have been folded 
into 661 parcels, and 647 such parcels have been tied up and 
labelled preparatory to being bound. 

Two volumes of the Blue Copy of the General Catalogue, 
and 12 volumes of the Red Copy have been broken up and 
rebound in 26 new volumes. Also, 137 columns have been 
re-laid in each of the three interleaved copies of the General 
Catalogue — a process rendered necessary by the accumulation 
of titles under certain headings. 

IV. Reading Room Service. — The Reading Room was 
closed from the 15th April to the 31st October for renovation. 
During this period a room in the North Library was fitted 
up and used as a temporary Reading Room. 

The number of volumes replaced in the General Library 
after use in the Reading Room was 497,880 ; in the King's 
Library, 17,844 ; in the Grenville Library, 1,611 ; in the Map 
Room, 2,359 ; in the presses in which books are kept from 
day to day for the use of readers, 413,399 ; and in the 
Oriental Department, 405 ; making a total amount of 934,998 
volumes supplied to readers during the year, exclusive of 
those to which the readers have personal access on the 
shelves of the Reading Room. 

During the year the Reading Room was open for 139 days, 
and the temporary Reading Room, which contained accom- 
modation for about 150 persons, for 172 days. The total 
number of readers during the year was 137,682, giving an 
average of over 442 daily ; the average number of volumes 
supplied to each reader amounts to seven. 

.Newspaper Room. — The number of readers during the 
year has been 20,098, giving a daily average of over 65, the 
room having been open on 305 days. The number of volumes 
replaced after use was 52,960, giving a daily average of 173 
and of over two volumes to each reader, not reckoning 
volumes, chiefly Parliamentary Papers, taken from the shelves 
of the Newspaper Room by the readers themselves. In 
addition to the above, 1,300 newspapers have been brought to 
the Library from the Newspaper Repository at Hendon for 
the use of readers. 

Map Room.. — 281 visitors have made use of the Map Room 
for the purpose of special geographical research. 

Photography. — There have been 343 applications for leave 
to photograph from books in the Library, and 742 volumes 
have been supplied to the applicants for this purpose. 

V. Accessions. — (a) 30,499 Volumes and Pamphlets (in- 
cluding 277 atlases, &c., and 2,640 books of music) have been 
added to the Library in the course of the year. Of these, 
7,535 were presented ; 16,176 received under the provisions 



DEPARTMENT OP PRINTED BOOKS. 23 

of the Copyright Act ; 458 by Colonial Copyright ; 675 by 
International Exchange ; and 5,655 acquired by purchase. 

(6) 69,425 Parts of Volumes (or separate numbers of 
magazines and other serial publications and of works in 
progress) have also been added to the Library. Of these, 
2,446 were presented ; 44,695 received under the provisions 
of the Copyright Act ; 547 by Colonial Copyright ; 658 by 
International Exchange; and 21,079 acquired hj purchase. 

(c) 1,944 Maps in 8,402 sheets have been added to the 
collection in the course of the year. Of these, 702 maps in 
1,133 sheets were presented ; 841 maps in 6,459 sheets were 
received under the provisions of the Copyright Act ; 199 maps 
in 200 sheets, by Colonial Copyright ; and 202 maps in 610 
sheets were acquired by purchase. 

(d) 10,111 Musical Publications have been added to the 
collection. Of these, 9,617 were received under the provisions 
of the Copyright Act ; 341 by Colonial Copyright ; and 153 
were acquired by purchase. 

(e) The number of Newspapers published in the United 
Kingdom, received under the provisions of the Copy- 
right Act during the year, has been 3,442, comprising 233,377 
single numbers. 1,208 of these newspapers were published 
in London and its suburbs ; 1,711 in other parts of England 
and Wales and in the Channel Islands ; 277 in Scotland ; 
and 246 in Ireland. 14 sets, containing 4,414 numbers, were 
received by Colonial Copyright ; 273 sets, containing 38,703 
numbers of Colonial and foreign newspapers, have been 
presented ; and 74 sets, containing 12 volumes and 12,744 
numbers of current colonial and foreign newspapers, have 
been purchased. 

(/) 4,136 articles not included in the foregoing paragraphs 
have been received in the Department. These consist of 
Single Sheets, Parliamentary Papers, and other miscellaneous 
items. 

The total number of articles enumerated above, as having 
been received in the Department during the present year, 
exclusive of newspapers, is 116,115. 

Acquisitions of Special Interest. — Seventy-one English 
books printed before the year 1640, and forty-five Incunabula, 
one of which is from the press of William Caxton at West- 
minster, have been added to the Library during the year 
1907. 

Among the English books, the most interesting are : — 
An Indulgence granted on the authority of Pope Sixtus IV. 
by Johannes de Gigliis in order to obtain money for the 
defence of Rhodes. Printed by William Caxton at West- 
minster in 1481. One of the two copies known to exist of 
the '•' singular " issue of this Indulgence, i.e., that drawn up 
for the use of one contributor only. 



24 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Statutes of the twenty-second year of King Henry VIII. 
Thomas Powell, London, 1531. 

Erasmus : " Paraphrase upon ye Epistle of S. Paule unto 
Titus." John Byddell, London^ about 1535. 

" The Decree for Tythes to be payed in London." Thomas 
Berthelet, London, 1546. 

Bush, Paul, First Bishop of Bristol : " A brefe Exhortation 
set fourthe to one Margarete Burges wyfe to Jhon Burges, 
clotheare of Kyngeswode, in the Countie of Wilshere." John 
Cawood. London, 1556. 

Wermueller, Otto : " A Spirituall Pearle. Translated into 
English by Miles Coverdale." W. Leake, London, 1560. 

Bale, John : " A new Comedy or Enterlude concernyng 
the lawes of Nature, Moises and Christe." Thomas Colwell, 
London, 1562. 

Mascall, Leonard : " The jfirst booke of Cattell." John 
Wolfe, London, 1587. 

Sidney, Sir Philip : " The Defence of Poesie." Printed 
for William Ponsonby, London, 1595. Two editions of this 
work were printed in the year 1597. One, already in the 
British Museum, under the title of " An Apologie for Poetrie," 
printed without authority by Henry Olney ; and the present 
authorized edition published*^ by William Ponsonby, of which 
only one other copy is known. 

"A moste pythie Epistle to anymate all trew Christians. 
Translated out off fFrench by Robert Pownall." Geneva, 
1596. 

" A verie 'perfect Discourse and Order how to know the 
age of a Horse. By L. W. C." Thomas Pavier, London, 1601. 
The only known copy. 

" Christes Bloodie Sweat. By J. F.," 1616. Attributed 
to Joseph Fletcher, Rector of Wilby, Suffolk. 

A collection of broadsides, single - sheets, and folio 
pamphlets, consisting of proclamations, legal documents, 
trials and political tracts relating to the history of Scotland 
between the years 1644 and 1700. 

The Italian original and a French translation of a book 
by the Abbe Prime, writing under the assumed name of 
" II Conte San Maiolo," entitled " Historia della" Guerra 
d'Olanda." Paris, 1682. This book, which contains an 
account of the secret articles of the Treaty of Dover, May, 
1670, was suppressed at the instance of Viscount Preston, the 
English Ambassador to France. 

Incunabula. — Two interesting Incunabula which have 
been presented to the Library are described below among the 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 25 

Donations. Of those purchased during the course of the 
year, the following deserve special mention : — 

Antoninus, Archbishop of Florence : " Summa Confes- 
sionum." Printed by Antonius Zarotus at Milan, 1472. 

"Leben der Heiligen." Printed by Giinther Zainer at 
Augsburg, 1472. With numerous woodcuts. 

Rufus, S'extus : " De rebus gestis Populi Romani " and 
" De aedificatione Venetiarum " Printed by Florenz of 
Strassburg at Venice, about 1472. 

Thomas Aquinas : " De Corpore Christi." Printed by the 
anonymous printer known as the printer of " Augustinus de 
Fide," at Cologne, 1473. 

Thomas Aquinas : " Quaestiones de Malo." Printed by 
Arnold ter Hoernen, the second Drinter at Cologne, about 
1473. 

Eusebius Pamphili: "De evangelica praeparatione." Printed 
by Ulrich Zell at Cologne, about 1474. 

Bernard, Saint : " De Consideratione." Printed by Nicolas 
Ketelaer and Gerhard Leempt at Utrecht, about 1474. 

Bernard, Saint : " Speculum de honestate vitae." Printed 
by Martin Flach at Basel, about 1475. 

Barbatia, Andreas : " Repetitio solemnis rubricae de fide 
instrumentorum." Printed by Martin Huss, Toulouse, 
20 June, 1476. Toulouse was the third city in France into 
which printing was introduced. The first books printed at 
Paris and at Lyons are already in the Library. The present 
is the first book printed at Toulouse. 

Gratianus : " Concordantiae Canonum." Printed by Ulrich 
Han at Rome, 1478. 

A Psalter, printed by Aloisi'us Siliprandus at Venice, 1478. 
Two books only printed by Siliprandus have been hitherto 
known, one of which was printed at Venice in 1477, the other 
at Mantua in 1480. 

"Pharetra, auctoritates et dicta doctorum et poetarum 
continens." Printed by Conrad Winters at Cologne, about 
1480. 

Strabo : " Geographia." Printed by Joannes Rubeus at 
Treviso, 1480. 

Nicolaus de Auximo : " Supplementum." Printed by 
Jacobinus Suigus at Vercelli, 27 October, 1485. There are 
already in the Library two works of this travelling printer, 
one produced at San Germano in 1485, the other at Chivasso 
in 1486. 

Pico della Mirandola, Giovanni : " Apologia." Printed by 
Matthias Morauus at Naples, 1487. 



26 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

" Summa Rudium." Printed by Johann Otmar at Reut- 
lingen, 1487. A theological and liturgical encylopsedia for 
unlettered priests. 

Lull, Raymond : " Janua Artis." Printed by Pedro Posa 
at Barcelona, 1488. 

Molitor, Ulrich : " De lamiis et phitonicis Mulieribus 
Tractatus." Printed by Johann Priiss at Strassburg, 1489. 
With seven interesting woodcuts. 

Petrarch : " Opera Latina," Printed by Simon Beuilaqua 
at Venice, 1493. 

Guido, de Monte Rocherii : " Manipulus Curatorum." 
Printed by Jacques Le Forestier at Rouen, 1497. In a fine 
contemporary binding. 

" Livre d'heures a I'usage d' Arras." Printed by Philippe 
Pigouchet at Paris, 1499. The only known copy. 

Bindings. — Several books in sumptuous or interesting 
bindings have been added to the Library during the year. 
Among these are : — 

Cudworth, Ralph : " The True Intellectual System of the 
Universe," London, 1648. Bound by Samuel Mearne in red 
morocco with gold tooling. 

Three books bound in black morocco with blind tooling ; 
a description of binding used in England during the later 
years of the seventeenth and early years of the eighteenth 
centuries. All three are fine specimens of this curious form 
of binding. 

Fortescue, Sir John : " Diff'erence between an absolute 
and limited Monarchy." London, 1724. In a fine contem- 
porary English binding in black morocco with gold tooling. 

" Book of Common Prayer," Dublin, 1750, folio. A fine 
specimen of Irish bookbinding of the eighteenth century. 

Donations. — Among the many valuable donations which 
have enriched the Library during the year 1907 are the 
following : — 

Le Grand, Jacques : " Sophologium." Printed at Strass- 
burg about 1477, by the anonymous printer (probably Adolf 
Rusch) known as the " R printer " from his use of a peculiar 
form of the letter R. Presented by George Dunn, Esq. 

The last ten leaves of the *•' Historia Baetica " of Carolus 
Verardus. Printed by Eucharius Silber at Rome, 1493, 
completing the copy of the work in the Library. The last 
leaf consists of the music of a four-part song printed from 
blocks, probably the earliest example of mensurable music 
printed at Rome. Presented by A. H. Littleton, Esq. 

The original copper-plate of the form of Commission 
issued to the Customs Officers in Boston, Massachusetts, in or 
about the year 1773, together with three impressions of the 
plate. Presented by H.M. Board of Customs. 



DEPAETMENT OF PRINTED BOOKS. 27 

Twenty- eight editions of separate works by Lord 
Tennyson, including a copy of " The Falcon " printed for the 
author, 1879 ; eleven editions of " In Memoriam " published 
between the years 1855 and 1867; seven editions of "The 
Princess " published between 1854 and 1867 ; and eight 
editions of " Maud " published between 1861 and 1874. 
Presented by T. J. Wise, Esq. 

" Catalogue of the Rodolphe Kann Collection." 4 vols. 
Paris, 1907. Presented hy Messrs. Duveen Brothers. 

A collection of Newspapers published in the British 
Colonies during the year 1906, in continuation of the series 
previously presented. Presented by the Royal Colonial 
Institute. 

Files of the " Gloucester Journal," between the years 
1777 and 1826. Presented by the Committee of the Gloucester 
Public Library. 

A collection of 1,377 pieces of sheet music, chiefly of the 
eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Presented by the 
Royal College of Music. 

Maps. — The following are among the most important 
additions to the collection of Maps during the year 1907 : — 

Ortelius, Abraham : '* Additamentum Theatri Orbis 
Terrarum." Antwerp, 1579. 

The first issue of the second supplement, together with 
the supplements published at Antwerp in the years 1580, 
1584, and 1590. 

Ortelius, Abraham : " L'Epitome du Theatre de I'Univers." 
Antwerp, 1602. 

Ortelius, Abraham : " Theatro del Mondo." Venice, 1697. 

A Facsimile in 19 sheets of a map of the World by Jodocus 
Hondius, originally published in Amsterdam 1611. Edited by 
E. L. Stevenson and J. Fischer. New York, 1907. 

Mercator, Gerardus : An Atlas containing 179 maps 
engraved by Jodocus Hondius and Petrus Kaerius. 
Amsterdam, 1632. 

Senex, John : " The English Atlas, consisting of thirty- 
one maps." London, 1714. 

Music. — In addition to the music presented during the 
year and described above under Donations, the following 
interesting accessions have been acquired for the Musical 
Library. 

" Certaine notes set forth in foure, and three parts to be 
song at the Morning Communion, and Evening Praier." 
(Two parts, Medius and Bassus.) John Day, London, 1560. 

" Mornying and Evenyng Prayer and Communion." (Two 
parts, Contra-Tenor and Tenor.) John Day, London, 1565. 



28 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BEITISH MUSEUM. 

These four parts form a complete copy of this work, which 
was designed to supply polyphonic settings of the Book of 
Common Prayer, with a few anthems. The composers were 
Thomas Tallis, Thomas Causton and several others. Only 
two other copies of either edition are known, one at West- 
minster Abbey, the other in the Bodleian Library. 

Zange, Nicolas : " Kurtzweilige Newe Teutsche Lieder." 
4 Pts. Cologne, 1603. Wanting the title-page and pages 1-4 
of the first part. Only one perfect copy of this book, which 
contains a musical setting of the street cries of Cologne, is 
known to exist. 

Bach, Johann Sebastian : " Sechs Chorale fiir Orgel," 
published between the years 1747 and 1749. 

Only three other copies of this work are known. 

Q. K. Fortescue. 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 29 



Department of Manuscripts. 

1. Catalogue of Additions. — The printed Catalogue of 
the MSS. acquired in 1900-1905 has been published. 

The descriptions of MSS. acquired in 1906 have been 
printed, and have been incorporated in the Class Catalogue 
kept in the Students' Room. 

All the MSS. acquired in 1907, viz. Additional 37426- 
37628 and Egerton 2866-2873, have been described and 
indexed, with the exception of the Romilly Allen archaeological 
collections, the arrangement of which is not yet complete. 
The descriptions have been revised and are ready for press. 

2. Catalogue of Papyri. — Vol. III., with an atlas of 
100 plates, has been published. Vol. IV., which will contain 
Greek papyri of the eighth century, is in an advanced state 
of preparation. Several papyri have also been transcribed 
for Vol. V. 

3. Catalogue of the Royal MSS. — One hundred and forty- 
eight MSS. in the Royal collection have been described for the 
new detailed Catalogue. 

4. Catalogue of Music. — Vol. II. (Secular Vocal Music) 
has been printed off, and is ready for issue. 

5. Catalogue of Romances. — Progress has been made in 
the preparation of Vol. III., descriptions of thirty-two MSS. 
having been finally revised for press. 

6. Catalogue of Charters. — Additional Charters 46918- 
47379, 48171-49841, 52392-53091 (acquired in 1903), 53195- 
53708 (acquired in 1904), and 53709-53827 (acquired in 1905) 
have been described and indexed. 

The revision of the index-slips of topographical entries from 
Charters acquired in 1882-1900 for Vol. II. of the General 
Index of Charters has been continued, letters A-M being 
now ready for press. 

7. Binding. — One hundred and seventy Additional MSS. 
and six Egerton MSS. newly acquired, and seventy-six MSS. 
of the old collections, have been bound or repaired, together 
with 150 Books of Reference and Catalogues. 

One hundred and forty-seven Papyri have been bound and 
glazed. 

8. Verification. — The entire collection of MSS. has been 
verified by comparison with the Shelf-Lists, and a large 
portion of the Additional Charters has also been verified. 



30 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

9. Reproductions. — Series I. and II. of Reproductions 
from Illuminated MSS. have been prepared and issued. 

10. Stamping, folioing, and placing. — One hundred and 
ninety-eight Additional MSS., six Egerton MSS., six hundred 
and seventy Charters and Rolls, and two hundred and thirty- 
two Books of Reference have been stamped, with a total 
of 24521 impressions ; 1450 numbers have also been impressed 
upon rubbings. 

One hundred and nineteen MSS. have been folio'd, with 
a total of 80323 folios. 31469 Index-slips, etc., have also 
been numbered. 

One hundred and ninety-nine Additional MSS. have been 
placed, press-marked, and entered in the Hand- and Shelf- 
Lists. One hundred and eighteen Charters and Rolls and 
thirty-four Seals and Casts of Seals have been placed, and 
entered in the Inventories. Numbers have been written on 
1409 Charters. 

A new second volume of the Hand-List of Additional 
MSS., a new Hand-List to the Cotton Charters, and a new 
Shelf-List of Exhibited MSS., have been completed. Others 
are in progress. 

11. Books of Reference.— Two hundred and thirty-one 
volumes and parts have been received, catalogued, and placed. 
Progress has been made with the preparation of a new 
catalogue. 

12. Consultation of MSS.—S264^7 MSS. and 6131 Charters 
and Seals have been consulted in the Students' Room, and 
ninety MSS. in the large Reading Room. The number of 
Students has been 11854. 

Magna Charta was exhibited to 9409 visitors. 

13. MSS. photographed.— Eight hundred and fifty MSS. 
(including Charters and Seals) were allowed to be photo- 
graphed, with a total of 6863 photographs taken. 

14. Acquisitions. — The number of Manuscripts and Docu- 
ments, etc., acouired during the year has been : — 

Additional MSS. ------ 203 

Egerton MSS. ------ 8 

Charters and Rolls ------ 144 

Detached Seals and Casts _ _ . - 33 
Papyri --------67 

The most important of the acquisitions by gift during the 
year are of literary interest. A volume of correspondence 
of Shelley with Miss Elizabeth Hitchener, June, 1811-June, 
1812, including 44 letters of the poet, five of which contain 
verses, was presented by the Rev. Charles Hargrove, of 
Leeds. It was bequeathed to him by Mrs. Charlotte M. Slack, 
with the request that it should ultimately pass to the British 
Museum on his death. 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 31 

Another valuable Shelley autograph, his poem " To Jane 
— The Kecollection," dated 2 February, 1822, was presented 
by Lieut.-Colonel C. F. Call and Mrs. Call. The latter 
inherited it from her father E. J. Trelawny, to whom it was 
given by " Jane " (Mrs. Williams). 

Mr. C. Fairfax Murray presented the autograph first 
draft of a considerable part of " Sigurd the Volsung," by 
William Morris, with the laudable intention that it might 
be preserved with the autograph fair copy, which was acquired 
by purchase earlier in the year ; and to this he added the 
autograph of the dedication, prologue, and other portions of 
" The Earthly Paradise." Morris is therefore now represented 
in the Museum by MSS. of his two finest poems. An 
interesting letter of Keats to B. W. Haydon, referring to 
" Endymion " and " Hyperion," was also received from the 
same generous donor, to accompany the autograph of 
" Hyperion," purchased in 1904. 

The acquisitions by purchase include a long Greek papyrus 
roll from Antinoopolis, containing the record of a disputed 
inheritance dated in A.D. 612, with a marriage contract on 
the back relating to the same place. An interesting group 
of over thirty Greek papyri, for the most part in exceptionally 
good condition, has also been acquired from Syene (Assouan). 
They include contracts and legal documents of various kinds 
between A.D. 549 and 613, most of the parties concerned 
being soldiers of corps stationed at or near Syene. Another 
purchase of exceptional interest is a large Latin Psalter, 
Hymnary, etc., with a partial Anglo-Saxon gloss, written in 
the South of England (possibly at Canterbury) in the latter 
part of the 10th century, and decorated with fine ornamental 
initials. It belonged successively to Archbishop Cranmer, 
Henry FitzAlan, Earl of Arundel, and John, Lord Lumley, 
and was perhaps at one time in the Royal Library, in which 
Lord Lumley's collection was absorbed after his death in 1609. 

Among other acquisitions, by purchase, donation, or be- 
quest are the following : — 

Wooden book, composed of eight tablets fastened together 
by silk cords ; with writing in Greek of a grammatical 
character, of the 3rd cent., on seven of the pages. Found in 
Egypt, and no doubt intended for school use. 

Wooden tablet, whitened and ruled with lines, inscribed 
with Greek grammatical exercises for school use in Egypt ; 
3rd cent. 

Life and miracles of St. Cosmas and Damian, in Greek ; 
10th--llth cent. A hitherto unknown recension. 

The Four Gospels, in Greek, written by the scribe 
Xenophon ; early 13th cent. Two volumes. 

Lexicon Tironianum : a collection of the Latin shorthand 
symbols originally invented by M. Tullius Tiro, freedman of 



32 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Cicero ; lOth cent. With two flyleaves in uncial characters 
of the 8th cent, containing fragments of a Sacramentary and 
of the Gospels of SS. Mark, Luke and John. 

Bible, in Latin, with illuminated initials, from St. Martin's 
Priory, Dover ; 13th cent. 

Bible, in Latin, written in Italy in a minute hand, with 
beautifully executed coloured initials ; 13th cent. 

Missal, in Latin, of Sarum use, with small miniature 
initials; 14th cent. 

Breviary, in Latin, of York or some allied use ; late 14th 
cent. 

The Poetria Novella of Geoffrey de Vinsauf, a copy 
written in Italy, with Italian glosses, in 1382. 

Romances and religious poems in English, including 
" King Charles," " Otinel," " The Hermit and Outlaw," " The 
Fendys Parlement," etc. ; 15th cent. 

Travels of Sir John Mandeville, in the vulgate Latin 
version ; followed by a narrative of the visit of an Hungarian 
noble to St. Patrick's Purgatory in Ireland in 1353, etc. 
Written by Johann Swanf elder, a Carmelite, in 1457. 

Illuminated miniatures, mostly within initials, cut from 
manuscripts, comprising twelve of scenes from the Life of 
Christ on a single leaf from an English MS., 12th cent., four 
from Italian MSS., loth cent., and seven from French MSS., 
late loth cent. 

Two small miniatures from an Italian MS. of Gratian's 
Decretum ; 14th cent. 

Book of emblems or drawings illustrative of proverbs, 
etc., accompanied by verses in French ; early 16th cent. 

Book of accompts of W. de Ayremyn, comptroller, of the 
expenses of the war with France, 1 Dec. 1372-31 Jan. 1374, 
especially in connection with the abortive expedition of John 
of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. 

Treatise on heraldry, by J. de Vado Aureo, al. Bado 
Aureo, in Latin ; 15th cent. With the Order of proceeding to 
Parliament, 12 Jan. 1563, etc., in the hand of R. Glover, 
Somerset Herald. 

Year-book of law-cases, 10-21 Edw. IV. [1470-1482], in 
Law-French ; written by Robert Chaloner, early 16th cent. 
Presented by Evan Hare, Esq. 

Precedents of counts and pleadings, chiefly tempp. Hen. 
VI-Hen. VII., in Latin, arranged under heads ; originally 
written about 1493, but continued in various hands to 1520. 

Register of instructions, letters, etc., of the Government 
of Ireland ; 1582-1608. 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS S3 

Minute-book of the Parliamentary Committee for Essex, 
chiefly relating to sequestrations and assessments ; 1643-1654. 

Summary of the London weekly Bills of Mortality during 
the Great Plague, 25 Apr.-12 Dec. 1665, drawn up at the 
time by Col. Jeremy Baynes. 

Letter-book of Sir W. Button Colt, Envoy to Hanover 
and Zell ; Jan., 1691-May, 1692. 

Register of letters from the Lords Justices of Ireland to 
the Earl of Rochester, Lord Lieutenant, when he was in 
England; Apr.-Aug., 1702. 

Letter-books of Richard Hill, Envoy to Turin ; 1703-1706. 
Two volumes. 

Letter of Lord Ellenborough, Lord Chief Justice, to the 
Home Secretary, on the conviction of Col. Despard and his 
fellow-conspirators ; 1803. 

Letter of William Pitt, without address, explaining his 
political views and asking for support to defeat Addington's 
ministry ; 11 Apr. 1804. 

Letter of the Earl of Eldon, Lord Chancellor, on the 
debate in the House of Lords on Roman Catholic disabilities ; 
1821. 

Autograph draft of the speech of B. Disraeli in the House 
of Commons, 15 Nov. 1852, on the death of the Duke of 
Wellington ; with letters from the same to his sister and 
others, 1828-1852. 

Elegy on Sir Edward Coke, with an introductory ode to 
his daughter Mrs. Anne Sadleir and an acrostic epitaph, in 
the autograph of Robert Codrington, M.A. ; 1634. In the 
original binding, with emblematic tooling. 

Two letters from John Dryden to Jacob Tonson, the 
bookseller, 1684, 1697; and a letter from Alexander Pope to 
the same, 1731. 

Autograph " Journal " of Edward Gibbon, the historian, 
begun 24 Aug. 1761, and containing particulars of events in 
his life from his birth, 8 May 1737, to 4 Aug. 1761. Part I. 
of a series, four of which, ending in Dec. 1764, were acquired 
in 1895. 

Autograph poem, " Summer Morning," by John Clare, the 
" Peasant Poet," printed in 1821. Presented by Mr. Charles 
Dack. 

Four letters from Lord Byron to E. D. Clarke, the 
traveller, on " Childe Harold," " The Bride of Abydos," etc. ; 
1812, 1813. 

Autograph MSS. of Tennyson's " Experiments in 
Quantity," printed in Enoch Arden, etc. ; 1864. 

0.109. g 



"34 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Letter of Edward Fitzgerald, the poet, to Capt. " Posh " 
(Joseph Fletcher) ; 18C9. 

Twenty-one letters of Voltaire to Pastor AUamand, of 
Bex and Corsier, Switzerland, with drafts of letters of 
Allamand; 1755-1772. 

Correspondence of John Alexander, Bishop of Dunkeld, 
on the state of the Scottish church, etc. ; 1727-1771. With 
a statement by W. Clift as to the destruction by Sir E. Home 
of John Hunter's MSS. in 1823, etc. Presented by C. Davies 
Sherborn, Esq. 

Letter-book of Samuel Bentham, the naval architect, and 
Jeremy Bentham, the philosopher, his brother; 1784-1789. 
Presented by Sir J. D. Hooker, O.M., K. G.S.I. 

Genealogical collections for the family of Emerson, by 
Dr. Peter H. Emerson. Presented by Dr. P. H. Emerson. 

Letters (2) of John Flaxman to W. Hayley, with reference 
to sculptures which he had in hand ; 1802, 1803. 

Letters of Richard Garnett, late Keeper of Printed Books, 
British Museum, to his brother J. W. Garnett, on literary 
and other subjects ; 1851-1864. 

Descent of F. Gawdy and Lettice Knollys his wife, with 
coloured shields of arms ; 1611. 

Pedigrees of Hardwicke of Southfield Grange, co. York, 
to 1906, by Herbert Junius Hardwicke, M.D. Presented by 
the compiler. 

" Time-Book " of Charles Turner, A.R.A., the engraver, 
with notes of his works, accounts, etc. ; 1798-1804. 

Journals, correspondence and papers of Joseph Hekekyan 
Bey, an Armenian in the Egyptian service, 1829-1874, and 
engaged in archaeological excavations, etc. Twenty-four 
volumes. Presented by Tito Hekekyan Pasha. 

Ecclesiological collections of J. T. Micklethwaite (d. 1906), 
architect to Westminster Abbey, etc. Six volumes. Pre- 
sented by Somers Clarke, Esq., F.S.A. 

Archaeological collections of the late J. Romilly Allen, 
chiefly relating to ancient sculptured monuments and Celtic 
ornamentation. Ninety volumes and boxes. 

Pipe-roll discharge to E. Duke, Sheriff of Devon ; 1679. 
Vellum roll. 

Rubbings of church-bell inscriptions in Dorsetshire : 
135 rolls. Presented by H. B. Walters, Esq. 

Plans of lands of Sir J. Bateman in Aymestrey, co. 
Hereford, 1708 ; and of R. Chaplin in Livers Ocle, co. 
Hereford, 1705. With coloured shields of arms. Vellum 
rolls. 



DEPARTMENT OF MSS. 35 

Rubbings of church-bell inscriptions in Huntingdonshire, 
by the Rev. T. M. N. Owen : 68 rolls. 

Court-book of the Manor of Keadby, in Althorpe, co. 
Lincoln; 1684-1723. 

Valuation of East Bedfont, co. Middlesex, by T. Denton, 
with lists of land-owners and tenants, 1815. Presented hy 
G. Davies Sherborn, Esq. 

Collections on the language of Northumbria, by Canon 
James Raine; circ. 1855-1895. 

Terrier of estates of Sir W. Jerningham, Bart., in Shrop- 
shire and Staffordshire, with finely executed plans and 
sketches, by J. SherrifF; 1788. A large folio volume, on 
vellum. 

Collections relating to church-bells, chiefly in Suffolk 
and Cambridgeshire, by J. J. Raven, D.D., vicar of Fressing- 
field. Twelve vols, and 148 rubbings. 

Papers relating to manors and lands in Warwickshire, 
Middlesex, and elsewhere, chiefly belonging to the family of 
Newdigate ; 16th-19th cents. Nine volumes. Presented by 
the Rev. J. Harvey Bloom. 

Rubbings of church-bell inscriptions in Warwickshire 
and Worcestershire : 20 rolls. Presented by the same. 

Chartulary of the priory of Maiden Bradley, co. Wilts, 
chiefly relating to lands in Kidderminster ; 14th cent., with 
additions to 1492. 

Register of the Quakers in Scarborough, Whitby and 
Stainton Dale, co. York ; 1661-1825. A transcript by Bernard 
P. Scattergood, of Leeds, 1903. Presented by B. P. Scatter- 
good, Esq. 

Original plans by Robert Mylne, Royal Master-Mason in 
Scotland, for the rebuilding of Holyrood Palace, Edinburgh, 
in 1671. Two volumes. 

Journal of Captain Cook's third and last Voyage to the 
South Seas, kept by Thomas Edgar, master of the "Dis- 
covery " ; 1 Aug., 1776-6 June, 1778. 

Collection of songs, etc., by Arne, Boyce, Handel, Pepusch, 
H. Carey and others, chiefly written for Marylebone, Ranelagh 
and Vauxhall Gardens ; 18th cent. 

Scenes from operas by J. B. Lully, A. Campra, and other 
composers ; circ. 1719. 

" Observations on Chanting, explanatory of a new system," 
in the autograph of Robert Lucas Pearsall ; 1851. 

George F. Warner. 



36 ACCOUNTS, ETC>, OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Oriental Printed Books and 
Manuscripts. 

Cataloguing and Arrangement. — The number of the 
sheets of the various Oriental Catalogues sent to press in 
1907 are :— Arabic Books, 2 sheets ; Hebrew MSS., 9 sheets ; 
Hindustani Accessions, 18 sheets ; Marathi Accessions, 4 
sheets ; Sanskrit Accessions, 13^ sheets. 

The numbers of Titles written for the various Cata- 
logues are : — Annamite, 2 ; Arabic, 38 ; Assamese, 26 
Assyrian, 1 ; Baluchi, 2 ; Bengali, 124 ; Burmese, 302 
Canarese, 38; Chinese, 579 ; Coptic, 15 ; Ethiopic,9 ; GarO, 2 
Gujarati, 121; Hebrew, 52; Hindi, 289; Hindustani, 538 
Japanese, 75 ; Kachari, 6 : Kashmiri, 6 ; Kol, 6 ; Kurukh, 1 
Lushai, 15 ; Malayalam, 16 ; Mandaitic, 4 ; Marathi, 177 
Mikir, 12 ; Mundari, 12 ; Naga, 36 ; Oraon, 6 ; Oriya, 23 
Pali, 76; Pa^ijabi, 100; Pahlavi, 1 ; Persian, 1,321; Prakrit, 3 
Pushtu, 37; Sanskrit, 434 ; Santali,6; Sindhi, 39; Syriac,26 
Tamil, 664 ; Tamil in Arabic character, 5 ; Telugu, 175 
Turkish, 57; Zend, 19. 

Thirty-nine Arabic MSS. and 55 Hebrew MSS. have been 
fully catalogued, and shorter descriptions have been prepared 
of 20 Chinese MSS. 

Short descriptions of seventy MSS. acquired have been 
entered in the Descriptive List, the Register, and the 
Classed Inventory. 

Twenty-nine MSS. (ff. 2,572) have been folio'd. 

Binding. — The numbers of Printed Books and MSS. sent 
to the Binders are : — Arabic, Syriac, and Armenian Books, 
128; Chinese and Japanese Books, 70; Hebrew Books, 65; 
Persian and Turkish Books, 109 ; Sanskrit and other Indian 
Books, 226 ; MSS., 113 ; Pamphlets, 58. 

Students. — The number of Students working in the 
Students' Room attached to the Department during the year 
is 3,286. The number of Oriental Printed Books consulted 
in the Department is 7,206, and of those used in the Reading 
Room 405. The number of Oriental MSS. consulted in the 
Students' Room is 4,360. 

Photography. — Eighty-nine applications have been made 
to photograph from Books and MSS. 

Additions. — The number of works added to the Depart- 
ment during the year is 1,678, of which 1,608 are Printed 
Books and 70 are MSS. Of the Printed Books, 84 were 
bought ; 1,349 were received under the India Copyright Act ; 
54 were received under the Colonial Copyright Act ; and 121 
were presented, 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL PRINTED BOOKS AND MSS. ^7 



The MSS. are :— 



Arabic - 

Armenian 

Burmese 

Chinese - 

Coptic - 

Hebrew - 

Korean - 

Laos 

Manchu 

Nubian - 

Persian - 

Pushtu - 

Sanskrit 

Prakrit-Sanskrit 

Shan 



6 
1 
2 
3 

19 
2 



(in 112 parts). 



70 



The most important acquisitions are : — 

Arabic MSS. — 1. The Dlwans of four ancient Arabic 
poets, namely : — Tufail ibn *Auf, 'Amir ibn al-Tufai], 'Abid 
ibn al-'Abras, and al-Tirimmah ibn Hakim, each Diwan 
being accompanied by explanatory scholia. Dated a.h. 430 
(a.d. 1039); written in Moorish character. The Dlwans of 
these four poets have not hitherto been known to exist, 
although scattered poems from each of them had been 
found. 4°. 

2. TafsTr al-Masa'il wa'1-Ajwibah, a collection of theolo- 
gical responsa, by Abu Sa'Td 'Abd al-Wahhab ibn Muhammad 
al-Naisaburi al-Wa'iz. Dated a.h. 719 (A.D. 1319). No other 
copy of this work has so far been made known. 12°. 

Burmese IIS. — An Album of panoramic pictures of scenes 
at the court of the Burmese Kings, XlXth century. Fol, 

Chinese MSS. — 1. Personal Records of the Emperor T'ai 
Tsung Wen, founder of the present Manchu-Tartar dynasty. 
Vols. 1 and 2 (out of 4), covering the period between 1592 
and 1636. In yellow silk case. Fol. 

2. Edicts of the Emperor Yung Cheng (1723-1735), 
arranged according to subjects. Vols. 31-33 ; in red silk 
case. Fol. 

3. Official biographies of eminent public servants of the 
present dynasty. Vol. 25 (written after 1864). Fol. 



3S ACCOtJNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEtJM. 

4. A Korean Encyclopsedia written in Chinese. The 
present copy is a later and much enlarged manuscript edition 
of the work which was originally printed under royal 
instructions in 1770. 112 vols. 4°. 

Coptic MS8. — 1. A volume containing (1) the latter part 
of an encomium on the miracles of the Archangel Gabriel ; 
(2) the encomium of Theophilus of Alexandria on the Virgin 
Mary. A.D. 979. Vellum. 4°. 

2. An encomium on St. Michael by Theodosius of 
Alexandria, with the lessons for his festival, a.d. 983. 
Vellum. 4°. 

3. A volume containing (1) the Death of John the Evan- 
gelist ; (2) title-page of Gregory Nazianzenus' replies to 
Epiphanius of Ararat ; (3) Cyril of Alexandria on the Virgin 
Mary. A.D. 990. Vellum. 4°. 

4. A volume containing (1) the Acts of St. Eustathius 
Placidus ; (2) the life of St. Cyrus the anchorite, by Pambo 
of Scete ; (3) the encomium of Flavins of Ephesus upon 
Demetrius of Alexandria, etc. ; (4) the Asceticon of Ephraim 
S3'-rus ; (5) an Epistle of Ephraim Syrus ; (6) the Life of 
John Calybites. a.d. 1003. Vellum. 4°. 

5. A collection of seven Coptic MSS. in the Sahidic 
dialect, including a copy of the Apocalypse (the only known 
complete Sahidic MS. of any Book of the New Testament), 
apocryphal narratives of Christ and the Apostles, and Lives 
of Saints and Homilies. Late 10th and early 11th centuries. 

6. Three papyri of magical incantations, probably 
belonging to the 6th century. 

Hebrew MSS. — Two vellum rolls, one containing the 
Haftaroth, or prophetic lections, for the services of Sabbaths 
and Festivals, the other containing the portions of the 
Pentateuch for Sabbath afternoon and week-day services. 
XVIth century. The contents of both are very rarely found 
in scroll form. 

Japanese Printed Book. — Sei koku hokkei kwojo sha shin 
cho, containing photographs of Palace Buildings in the 
Forbidden City at Peking. Collotyped from the negatives 
taken by K. Ogawa. With notes in Japanese, Chinese, and 
English. 2 vols. Tokyo, 1906. Obi. Fol. 

Manchu MSS. — 1. Reports from Chinese Provincial 
Governors. Vols. 69-72 (containing nine reports belonging 
to A.D. 1833 down to 1863). In yellow silk case. Fol. 

2. Narrative of the chastisement and pacification of the 
tribes on the North-Western frontier of China. Vols. 1-3 
(containing Emperor's preface, redactor's report, and sum- 
mary). A.D. 1708. In yellow silk case. Fol. 

3. Official history of the present Manchu-Tartar dynasty, 
intended to be published only after the dynasty shall have 
ceased to rule. Vol. 41 (for the year 18.52). Fol. 



Department o^ oriental printed books and mss. 39 

Nubian MS. — Eighteen vellum leaves, apparently relating 
to the miracles of St. Menas. Probably 10th century. Only 
two other Nubian MSS. are known. 

Persian MS. — Kanarang-namah, an historical, poem on 
the wars of Fath 'AlT Shah of Persia (reigned a.h. 1211- 
1250), by Muhammad Husain Khan Malik al-Shu'ara. Dated 
A.H. 1243 (a.d. 1827). 8°. A contemporary account of the 
events narrated. 

Pushtu MS. — The Diwan, or collected poems, of Mukhlis. 
XVIIIth century. 8°. Otherwise unknown. 

Sanskrit Printed Book. — A Vedic Concordance, being an 
alphabetic index to every line of every stanza of the published 
Vedic literature and the liturgical formulae thereof. By 
Maurice Bloomfield. 1907. Harvard Oriental Series, Vol. 10. 

Sanskrit MSS. — A number of MSS. written in S'arada 
character, on birch-bark (probably XVIth century for the 
most part), of which the following are the most important : — 
1. A commentary by Narahari on S'riharsha's classical poem 
Naishadhiya, with text of the peom. Very rare. 4°. 

2. A commentary by Bhaskara Misra on books 7-8 of 
Mammata's Kavya-prakasa, a famous manual on the art of 
poetry. 8°. Exceedingly rare. 

3. A collection (now bound up in 12 volumes) of religious 
works, including Vedic lectionaries, rituals, hymns, etc. 8°. 

4. Nyaya-sara-pada-pancika, a treatise on logic, by 
Vasudeva ; of considerable antiquity and great rarity. 8°. 

5. Brahma -gupta's Khaiida-khadya, a treatise on 
astronomy. 8°. 

6. Abhinava-gupta's Isvara-pratyabhijna-vivriti-vimarsinT, 
a commentary on Utpala's Pratyabhijna-sutra. 8°. 

7. The Carayaniya (Kathaka) Grihya-bhashya, a commen- 
tary on a work treating on the rules of domestic ritual. 
Very rare and important for the study of the Kathaka 
recension of the Veda. 

L. D. Barnett. 



4-6 ACCOtTNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MLTSJEtrM. 



Department of Prints and Drawings. 

I. — Arrangement and Cataloguing, etc. 

All the Japanese woodcuts from the Franks, Hart, 
Morrison, Satow, Bacon, and Tuke collections severally have 
been brought together and arranged in a single series, which 
awaits mounting. 

The collection of the works of Stefano Delia Bella 
has been re-arranged in five volumes in accordance with 
De Vesme's recently published catalogue. 

The collection of the works of Francisco Goya has been 
re-arranged in accordance with Hofmann's catalogue. 

The woodcuts by Wolfgang Traut have been brought 
together and arranged in three portfolios. 

The woodcuts by Peter Flotner have been brought together 
and arranged in a portfolio. 

The collection of India proofs of woodcuts by the brothers 
Dalziel from designs by Sir J. Gilbert, G. J. Pinwell, J. Tenniel 
and J. D. Watson illustrating Goldsmith's Works, " Pilgrim's 
Progress," " Robinson Crusoe," Moore's " Lallah Rookh," and 
Longfellow's Poems have been mounted in five albums. 

Forty-nine India proofs of woodcuts by J. Gilks from 
designs by J. Leech, illustrating the " Comic Latin Grammar," 
have been mounted in a volume. 

New wrappers have been provided for the English 
historical prints and the works of Bartolozzi, Cipriani, and 
A. KaufFman. 

One hundred and fifty-four drawings and 1,846 prints 
recently acquired have been incorporated with the collections 
to which they severally belong. 

All books of prints and books of reference recently 
acquired have been catalogued, labelled, and placed. 

A collection of duplicate engravings, in 233 frames, has 
been lent to the Wolverhampton Municipal Art Gallery and 
Museum and returned in good order. 

The MS. of vol. i. of the catalogue of engraved British 
Portraits has been completed, and nearly the whole of the 
volume printed. 

The preparation of vol. ii. of the catalogue of Early 
German and Flemish Woodcuts has been continued, the 
division dealing with the school of Augsburg has been 
printed, and that dealing with the schools of Ratisbon, 
Bavaria, and Austria completed in MS. 



bfiPAHTMENT OF PRINT'S ANJD DRAWINGS. 41 

Tol. IV. (S-Z) of the catalogue of English Drawings has 
been completed and published and the preparation of a 
supplementary volume commenced. 

The preparation of a full critical and descriptive catalogue 
of the collection of Japanese Woodcuts has been commenced. 

The preparation of a catalogue of the collection of 
Early Italian Engravings has been continued and nearly 
completed in MS. 

The etchings by C. Meryon, J. F. Millet and Jongkind, 
and the lithographs by J. Dupre and H. Daumier have been 
marked off in the new catalogues by Loys Delteil. 

Titles have been written for articles in the " Gazette des 
Beaux Arts," " Zeitschrift fiir Bildende Kunst," and other 
foreign periodicals for the catalogue of books of reference. 

An index has been drawn up of names of artists repre- 
sented in the collection of prints of ornament. 

Slips have been written for indexes to prints in the illus- 
trated copies of Byron's " English Bards," etc., and Edwards's 
" Anecdotes," and for the collection of photographs presented 
by the National Photographic Record. 

The preparation of slips for an index to the Banks col- 
lection of shopbills, etc. has been continued. 

Registration. — 5874 items have been entered in the 
Register of Acquisitions. 

Stamping and Mounting. — 5630 duplicates removed 
from the Franks collection of foreign bookplates have been 
stamped as such, and will in due course be returned to the 
executor. 

6903 prints, drawings, etc., recently acquired, have been 
impressed with the departmental stamp and references to the 
Register. 

The work of preparing, specially repairing and mounting 
a selection from the Cheylesmore collection of mezzotint 
portraits has been continued. 1260 "ordinary" mezzotints 
belonging to the same collection have been fixed in wrappers 
for their better preservation. 

Seventeen drawings by Tintoretto have been repaired 
and mounted on sunk mounts with special borders. 

One hundred and fifty miscellaneous drawings have been 
prepared and mounted on sunk mounts, and one hundred 
and seventy-seven German woodcuts have been mounted in 
the ordinary manner. 

Students, — The total number of visitors admitted to the 
Print Room during the year ending 31 December 1907 was 
8590, showing an increase on those for 1906 notwithstanding 



i^ ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

the fact that the students' room was closed for four weeks 
for cleaning and painting. 

Photographing. — Three hundred and forty-nine appli- 
cations were made for leave to photograph objects in the 
collection, and 2284 photographs were taken. 



II. — Additions. 

The total number of prints, drawings, etc. acquired 
during the year was 4386, of which the following are the 
most important : — 

Italian School. 

Drawings. 

Robusti, Jacopo (Tintoretto). A collection of ninety 
sheets of drawings, acquired and bound in an album about 
1680 by Don Gaspar d'Haro e Guzman, Spanish ambassador 
at Rome and afterwards Viceroy of the Kingdom, of Naples. 
This collection, hitherto unknown to students, is of the 
highest value and importance, and throws a quite new light 
on the methods and powers of this great Venetian master. 
It consists of eighty fine original compositions rapidly drawn, 
or more strictly painted, on paper, in tempera touched in the 
high lights with oil, together with four or five copies by 
pupils or imitators, and ten drawings in the artist's more 
generally known manner (black chalk or brush outlines) ; of 
these last five are on the backs of sheets having painted 
compositions on their fronts. The compositions are in some 
cases projects and first ideas for well-known existing pictures 
by the master (e.g. the Miracle of the Slave liberated by 
St. Mark, in the Venice Academy ; the Miracle of the Saracen 
rescued by St. Mark from shipwreck, in the Royal Library at 
Venice ; the St. Sebastian in the Scuola di San Rocco) ; in 
many other cases they are for pictures which either were 
never carried out or have perished. The same subject is 
often repeated with experimental modifications many times 
over. For the subject of St. Anthony tempted by demons in 
the form of women there are twenty-two different designs ; 
for his persecution by beasts and hobgoblins, twelve ; for the 
Miracle of St. Mark and the Slave, five : for St. Mark en- 
throned writing his gospel, three ; for Christ's Charge to 
Peter, nine ; for an unexplained myth or allegory of a woman 
seated on her child's cradle and receiving the homage of 
attendant figures, six ; for another, possibly the descent of 
Hercules or Theseus to the underworld, five ; for an allegory 
of War, three ; for a reclining Venus, four. Subjects treated 
only once or twice each are the Baptism of Christ ; Christ 
raising the widow's son ; Christ healing in the synagogue on 
the Sabbath day ; the Conversion of St. Paul ; St. Mary 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 43 

Magdalene in penitence; St. Sebastian; a pope bestowing a 
vestment upon a kneeling man ; Diana and Calisto ; Diana 
and Actseon ; Arts and Arms paying homage to Bacchus ; 
Neptune and the Tritons offering the spoils of the sea to 
Venice. In colour these compositions vary from monochrome 
to a full scale ; in composition all show a high degree of 
energy, felicity, and resource, and, in handling, an extra- 
ordinary vigour and certainty of brush. 

Etchings. 
Zanetti, Antonio Maria. Twelve plates of peasants, etc. ; 
after G. B. Castiglione. 



German School. 

Drawings. 

Dillis, George. Portrait of Sir Benjamin Thompson, 
Count Rumford ; watercolours. 

Engravings. 

Flindt, Paul (of Nuremberg). Woman carrying a dishof 
fruit ; design for a drinking cup; signed P. V. N. 

Master of 1551 (M. Ziindt ?). Twenty-one plates of 
ornamental cups, ewers, candlesticks, etc., with the title 
" Insigne ac plane novum opus Cratero graphicum," etc., 
Nuremberg, 1551. 

Zan, Bernhard. An ornamental ewer ; signed B. Z. 1584. 

School of the Netherlands. 

Drawings. 

Gallait, Louis. Twelve studies and sketches of figures 
and compositions for his pictures ; pencil, chalks and water- 
colours. Presented by William Strutt, esq. 

Engravings. 

Blooteling, Abraham. Portrait of the wife of Jan Mieris ; 
after Mieris ; mezzotint. 

French School. 
Drawings. 

Fragonard, Jean-Honore. Subject from " Don Quixote " ; 
one of a set of nineteen formerly in the Denon collection ; 
pencil and bistre. Presented by J. C. Joyce, esq. 

Gillot, Claude. A fury presiding over groups of gamblers ; 
red chalk. A group of girls surrounding a term of. Cupid ; 
red chalk. 



4i4f ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MaSEUM. 

Etchings. 

Blery, Eugene. Seventeen plates of landscape ; in 
different states. Presented by Messrs. P. and D. Golnaghi 
& Go. 

Fragonard, Jean Honore. " L'Armoire." (Beraldi 2.) 
Paris, Joseph Francois. Donkey, goat and hens. Pre- 
sented by Messrs. P. and D. Golnaghi <So Go. 

Pissarro, Camille. Ten views of Rouen, published 1907. 
Presented by Madame Pissarro and M. Lucien Pissarro. 

Lithographs. 

Daumier, Honore. Twenty-four humorous designs, 
" Croquis d'Expression," " Caricaturana," " La Journee du 
Celibataire," etc. Presented by Gampbell Dodgson, esq. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 
Olivie, D. " Premiere Vue de I'Isle Barbe au milieu du 
Saone au dessus de Lyon " ; by Martini and J. P. Le Bas. 
Presented by Golonel Tudivay. 



Foreign Artists working in England. 

Drawings, 

Fuseli, Henry, R.A. Medea killing the dragon of the 
Golden Fleece ; oils on paper. A sibyl ; pencil. A Maniac 
in the Hospital of S. Spirito at Rome ; pen, bistre and 
Indian ink. Presented by J. G. Joyce, esq. 

Lundgren, Egron Sellif. An acolyte ; watercolours. 

Etchings. 

Legros, Alphonse. Eighty early plates, in various states. 
Presented by the National Art Gollections Fund. 



English School. 

Draivings. 

Bone, Muirhead. The Egyptian Saloon, British Museum, 
during repairs ; pencil. Scaffolding on the staircase of the 
British Museum ; gold point. Presented by a group of 
subscribers through the National Art Gollections Fund. 

Brabazon, Hercules B. Algiers ; watercolours. View near 
Bristol ; watercolours. Sunset, Madrid ; pastels. 

Burgess, William (of Dover). The Old Post, Salisbury ; 
watercolours. 

Charles, James. Ten studies of landscape and figures ; 
watercolours and pencil. Presented by Mrs. Gharles. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 45 

Clausen, George, A.R.A. Study for the picture " Going 
to Work " ; black chalk. Study of head of the painter's 
daughter ; black chalk, pencil and wash. Study for the 
picture " Building a Rick " ; watercolours. Presented by the 
Artist. 

Constable, John, R.A. Four studies of moorhens and a 
mouse; watercolours on brown paper. 

Dance, George, R.A. Design for the mural tablet to the 
memory of Jeremiah Meyer the miniature painter in Kew 
church ; Indian ink wash. 

Evans, Samuel Thomas (of Eton). Floods at Windsor, 
1866 ; watercolours. 

Evans, William (of Eton). View on the Yorkshire coast ; 
watercolours. 

Furse, Charles Wellington, A.R.A. Thirty-four sketches 
and studies, including scenes in and near Johannesburg 
during the raid of 1896, sketches for spandrils in the Liver- 
pool Town Hall, academical figures, etc. ; chalks and pencil. 
Also a book containing sketches done at sea and in South 
Africa, and studies of huntsmen and hounds. 

Gainsborough, Thomas, R.A. Portrait sketch of a lady 
seated in an armchair, holding a fan ; black and coloured 
chalks. 

Green, William. Ten views of scenery in the Lake 
district ; pencil. 

Hearne, Thomas. Holyrood Palace ; Indian ink wash. 

Hobday, William Armfield. Portrait of George Morland 
while in the rules of the King's Bench prison in 1800 ; pen 
and ink and watercolours. 

Humphry, Ozias, R.A. Portrait of Mrs. Anne Pitt, sister 
of the Earl of Chatham ; done at Rome 1777 ; pencil. 
Presented by E. E. Leggatt, esq. 

Hunt, William. An old man wearing an apron, seated; 
watercolours. 

Jackson, Samuel Phillips. A girl seated, holding a 
pitcher; pencil. 

Landseer, Sir Edwin, R.A. A tiger ; chalk and water- 
colour. 

Leslie, Charles Robert, R.A. Twenty sketches and 
studies of figures, trees, interiors, etc. ; watercolours, pencil 
and pen and ink. Presented by 0. D. Leslie, esq., R.A. 

Maclise, Daniel, R.A. Portrait of a lady, 1825 ; pencil. 
Portrait of Sir Walter Scott ; drawn from life at Mr. Bolster's, 
Cork, 9 August 1825 ; pencil. A brigand firing at a caval- 
cade ; a group of figures ; two pencil sketches : Presented 
by John Elliot, esq, 



46 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

New, Edmund Hort. Corfe Castle from the south ; pen 
and ink. Caesar's Tower, Warwick Castle ; pen and ink. 
Lichfield Cathedral ; pen and ink. Portrait of Rev. David 
Davis ; pen and ink. Presented hy the Artist. 

Owen, Samuel. Marine subject, 1805; watercolours. 

Reynolds, Sir Joshua, P.R.A. Original sketch for the 
figure of Comedy in " Garrick between Tragedy and 
Comedy " ; black and white chalk. 

Ross, Sir William, R.A. '* The Union— Thistle, Rose, 
Shamrock " ; watercolours. 

Shepherd, George. Exeter Change, Strand ; water- 
colours. St. Bartholomew's Hospital, Smithfield ; water- 
colours. 

Stevens, Alfred. Three sheets of studies for his picture 
of " Parmegiano at the sack of Rome " ; red chalk and pencil. 
Five copies of figures by Delia Robbia and another old 
master ; pencil. Presented by W. Bagshatve, esq., through 
the National Art Collections Fund. 

Strutt, Joseph. Portrait of himself ; pencil. Portrait of 
Miss Anne Blower, afterwards Mrs. Strutt ; pencil. Presented 
by W. Strutt, esq. 

Strutt, William Thomas. Two portrait miniatures of 
himself ; watercolours, one on ivory, the other on paper. 
Presented by W. Strutt, esq. 

Tomson, Arthur. Four studies of cats ; coloured chalks. 
Presented by Mrs. Tomson. 

Wilkie, David, R.A. Nine sketches and studies for his 
pictures. Presented by John Elliot, esq. 

Etchings. 

Bone, Muirhead. The Great Gantry, Charing Cross 
Station, 1906; trial proof. Presented by the Artist. 

Clausen, George, A. R.A. Twenty plates of portraits, 
rustic figures and groups, etc. Presented by the Artist. 

Green, William. Seventeen views of scenery in the Lake 
district. 

Merritt, Anna Lea. Thirteen plates ; portraits and other 
subjects. Presented by the Artist. 

Robinson, Sir John Charles. Cintra, Portugal — the 
Granite Country. Presented by the Artist. 

Engravings. 

Anonymous, 17th century. A group of the Protestant 
Reformers ; " sould by Thomas Jenner at the Exchange." 

Edwards, S. Arlent. The Duchess of Devonshire ; after 
Reynolds ; mezzotint. The Fortune Teller ; after Reynolds ; 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 47 

mezzotint. The Fortune Teller ; after W. Peters ; mezzotint. 
Visit to the Boarding School ; after G. Morland ; mezzotint. 
All printed in colours. Presented by the Engraver. 

Finnic, John, R.E. Eleven original plates of landscape ; 
mezzotint. 

Lucas, David. Thirteen small plates of American scenery, 
proofs before letters ; mezzotint. 

Strutt, Joseph. Portrait of Emily Anne Strutt; published 
with the title " The Blue Sash " ; after J. Russell ; stipple. 
Presented by W. Strutt, esq. 

Woodcuts. 

Dalziel Brothers. " The Parables of Our Lord " : after 
J. E. Millais ; twenty proofs on India paper. 

Prints arranged to illustrate the Works of Masters. 
Guthrie, James. Thirty-one reproductions of original 
drawings ; fancy subjects, designs for bookplates, etc. Pre- 
sented by the Artist. 

Stothard, Thomas, R.A. Twenty plates of biblical, 
historical and fancy subjects; engraved by Finden, J. Parker, 
J. Rogers, etc. Presented by Mrs. Sydney Morse. 



Japanese School. 

Eight early woodcuts printed in colours, by the following 
artists :— Kiyomitsu, 2 ; Kiyohiro, 3 ; O. Masanobu, 1 ; 
Toyonobu, 2. Presented by Sir Ernest Satow, G.G.M.G. 

Three hundred and twenty-four woodcuts printed in 
colours, including examples by the following artists :- — 
Kiyomasu, 2 ; Kiyomitsu, 3 ; Kiyohiro, 1 ; Kiyotsune, 2 
O. Masanobu, 2 ; Toyonobu, 3 ; Toyomasa, 4 ; Harunobu, 8 
Shigemasa, 4 ; Kitao Masanobu, 8 ; Shunsho, 9 ; Shunyei, 3 
Shunzan, 8; Shunsen, 3; Kiyonaga, 22; Shuncho, 11 
Shunman, 4 ; Shiko, 4 ; Banki, 1 ; Yeishi, 6 ; Yeisui, 1 
Yeiri, 1 ; Yeizan, 2 ; IJtamaro I., 12 ; Utamaro II., 1 
Hidemaro, 1 ; Hisanobu, 2 ; Sekijo, 1 ; Toyokuni, 6 
Toyohiro, 18 ; Kunihiro, 1 ; Hokusai, 55 ; Riuunsai, 1 
Matora, 1 ; Hokkei, 3 ; Gakutei, 3 ; Hokujiu, i ; Shunko, 1 
Hiroshige, 28 ; Kunimaru, 1 ; Kunisada, 20 ; Yeisen, 2 
Kuniyoshi, 7 ; Kunisada, II., 5 ; school of Toyokuni, 4 
Yoshikadzu, 1 ; Shunnen, 1 ; Moronobu, 5 ; Morikuni, 9 
Sukenobu, 7 ; Shunboku, 4 ; Ippitsusai Buncho, 1 ; Itcho, 2 
Bunyo, 1 ; and Buichi, 1. Presented by Sir Hickman Bacon, 
hart. 

Three hundred and ten woodcuts printed in colours, from 
the collection of Mr. S. Tuke, including examples by the fol- 
lowing artists : — Kiyomitsu, 3; Kiyohiro, 1 ; O. Masanobu, 2 j 



48 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Shunsui, 1 ; Toyonobu, 1 ; Toyomasa, 1 ; Harunobu, 13 ; 
Koriusai, 19 ; Shigemasa, 2 ; K. Masanobu, 2 ; Toyoharu, 1 ; 
Bokuriu, 2 ; Shunko, 7 ; Buncho, 1 ; Shunyei, 1 ; Shuntei, 3 ; 
Shunzan, 1; Shunsen, 8; Shunko II., 1; Kiyonaga, 13; 
Kiyomine, 3; Shuncho, 4; Shunman, 7 : Shiko, 1 ; Yeishosai, 1 ; 
Yeishi, 6 ; Yeisho, 3 ; Yeizan, 5 ; Yeisen, 4 ; Yenshi, 3 ; 
Utamaro, 21 ; Kikumaro, 5 ; Bunro, 1 ; Shucho, 1 ; Toyokuni, 
27 ; Toyohiro, 3 ; Toyokuni II., 5 ; Kimitora, 4 ; Kuniyasu, 
3 ; Kuninaga, 1 ; Kunitsuna, 1 ; Riusai, 14 ; Masadzumi, 2 ; 
Hokusai, 37 ; Hokuitsu, 1 ; Hokuba, 2 ; Shinsai, 3 ; Gakutei, 
1 ; Hiroshige, 19 ; Kunisada, 5 ; Sadahide, 3 ; Kuniyoshi, 26 ; 
Hoshiu, 1 ; Hirokage, 1 ; and Chikamaro, 1. 

Fourteen woodcuts by Hokusai, printed in colours, 
belonging to the series " Thirty-six views of Fuji." Presented 
hy W. C. Alexander, esq. 

Nine modern woodcuts illustrating the Russo-Japanese 
war printed in colours, including six by Kokyo and three 
by Gessan. Presented hy Dr. Ken Hoshino. 

History. 
Triumphal Entry into Parma of the papal legate before 
the marriage of Elizabeth Farnese to Philip V. of Spain, 
December 1714 ; engraved by T. Vercruysse, from a drawing 
by Ilario Spolverini in the British Museum. 

The choir of Parma Cathedral on the occasion of the 
above marriage ; engraved by F. M. Francia of Bologna. 

Bookplates. 

A collection of five hundred and ninety-one plates, chiefly 
French and German. Presented hy Max Rosenheim, esq., 
F.S.A, 

Plate of the George W. Mears, M.D., Memorial Medical 
Library, Philadelphia ; engraved by J. H. Fincken. Pre- 
sented hy Dr. J. Ewing Mears. 

The rare plate of the Croxteth Library, of which there is 
a copy in the Franks collection. Presented hy Sir Thornley 
Stoker. 

Collections. 

Ninety-five plates of incidents in the life of Louis XIV. ; 
after Anton Frans van der Meulen, engraved by J. Y. 
Huchtenburg, A. F. Bauduins, R. Bonnart, N. Cochin, 
C. Simonneau, F. Ertinger, and R. de Hooghe ; together with 
thirty-one etchings by A. Genoels and six by A. F. Bauduins ; 
bound in three vols. Presented hy Hon. Walter Rothschild. 
A volume of etchings by Giovanni Battista, Giovanni 
Domenico, and Lorenzo Tiepolo ; issued after the death of 
^ the elder Tiepolp i^ 1778. 



DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. 40 

Two hundred and two platinotype photographs of ancient 
or interesting buildings and monuments in various parts of 
the United Kingdom ; in continuation of the National Survey 
and Record. Presented by the Secretary on behalf of the 
contributors to the Survey and Record. 

Books of Prints and Books of Reference. 

Ben^dite, Leonce. " Fantin-Latour ; catalogue de I'oeuvre 
lithographique du Maitre," 1906. 

Benedite, Leonce. " Drawings by J. F. Millet, with fifty 
facsimile reproductions," fee, 1906. 

Bode, Wilhelm. " The complete Works of Rembrandt " ; 
part 8. 

Crawhall, Joseph. " Reynarde the Foxe " ; ten drawings 
reproduced by S. Hurd. Presented by W. B. Paterson, esq. 

Dickes, William Frederick. "The Norwich School of 
Painting," 1905. 

Foster, J. J. " French Art from Watteau to Prud'hon " ; 
vols. 2 and 3, 1907. 

Gebhart, Emile. " Sandro Botticelli et son Epoque," 1907. 

Hofstede de Groot, C. " Original Drawings by Rembrandt," 
part II., Nos. 51-100. 

Lemonnier, C. " Alfred Stevens et son Oeuvre " ; 1906. 
Meyer, J. and W. Bode. " Die Gemalde-Galerie zu 
Berlin"; Lief, xxii-xxiii. 

Michel, Andre. " Francois Boucher " ; 1907. 

Nolhac, Pierre de. " J. H. Fragonard, 1732-1806" ; 1906. 

Veth, J. " Josef Israels und sein Kunst " ; 1906. 

Ward, T. Humphrey and W. Roberts. " Catalogue of 
Pictures in the collection of J. Pierpont Morgan at Prince's 
Gate and Dover House" ; privately printed 1907; three vols. 
Presented by J. Pierpont Morgan, esq, 

Williamson, G. C, Litt. D. " Catalogue of the collec- 
tion of Miniatures the property of J. Pierpont Morgan " ; 
privately printed, 1906 ; three vols. Presented by J. Pierpont 
Morgan, esq. 

" Les Cuivres Originaux de Rembrandt ; reimpressions 
des planches originales " ; 1906. 

Sidney Colvin. 



Q,1Q9, 



50 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Egyptian and Assyrian Antiquities. 

I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, etc. 

Egyptian Antiquities: — 

The general re-arrangement of the Egyptian Collections 
has been continued and the greater number of the important 
objects acquired during the year have been incorporated and 
exhibited. 

In the re-arrangement of the Egyptian Galleries the 
tables for offerings, or altars, which were dispersed throughout 
the Galleries, have been brought together in chronological 
order in two bays in the Central Saloon. Several covers of 
sarcophagi have been repaired. New stone shelves have been 
built into eight bays. The labelling of the exhibits has 
been continued. 

A considerable number of the larger objects in the 
Galleries have been carefully cleansed. 

Ninety-three granite plinths have been placed in position 
and " fixed " ; fifty-one Caen stone plinths have been worked 
and placed in position ; thirty-six white alabaster plinths 
have been worked and polished, and figures of gods and 
sacred animals mounted on them ; and other figures and 
objects have been mounted on smaller pedestals. 

Three funerary boats have been cleaned and repaired, 
and figures of their crews placed in position : four inscribed 
coffins of the Xllth dynasty have been repaired, and thirteen 
altars, twelve stelae, and one hundred and forty-two 
miscellaneous objects have been cleaned, and several of 
them repaired. 

755 scarabs, small figures of gods, etc., have been mounted. 

One papyrus and seventeen fragments have been cleaned 
and mounted, 1,690 ostraka have been " boxed," 1,960 scarabs 
have been cleaned, and 134 painted plaster fragments have 
been rejoined. 

362 labels have been written and painted, and attached 
to the objects ; and 5,528 numbers have been painted on 
antiquities, etc. 

4,518 objects have been registered. 890 descriptive slips 
for the new Guide to the Egyptian Galleries have been 
written. 14 stone stelse have been copied and catalogued, 
and 31 wooden stelae have been catalogued. 

2,740 slips for a catalogue of scarabs have been written, 
and 3,049 have been revised for press. 



EGYPTIAN AND AssyiU-A.Nf ANTIQUITIES. 51 

Assyrian Antiquities : — 

The general re-arrangement of the unexhibited section of 
the Babylonian and Assyrian Collections has been continued. 

The Kuyunjik collection has been verified with the 
registers. 

133 tablets have been cleaned and repaired ; a number of 
case tablets have been opened, and the fragments of the cases 
rejoined ; casts of nineteen cylinder seals have been made 
and mounted with the seals on blocks. 

1,374 tablets have been registered, various texts have 
been collected, copied, collated, and arranged for publica- 
tion in fifty plates. Eighteen boundary stones have been 
catalogued, and the texts arranged to form a series of one 
hundred and eight plates. 

1,164 slips from a Catalogue of cylinder-seals have been 
written and revised for press ; and an Introduction and a 
list of proper names have been written for the edition of the 
Behistun texts. 

A slip-list of registration numbers, and a list of the tablets 
bearing seal impressions have been made. 

" The Sculptures and Inscription of Darius the Great on 
the Rock of Behistiin in Persia. A new collation of the 
Persian, Susian, and Babylonian Texts, with English trans- 
lation," has been completed and issued. 



Students. — 2,550 visits have been made to the Depart- 
ment by students and others; and 6,100 objects have been 
issued for their use. 

Personally conducted Parties. — Forty-seven parties 
have been personally conducted through the Department by 
members of the staff, the number of persons being one 
thousand and forty-two, including many pupil teachers and 
scholars from the London County Council Schools. The 
parties came from educational and social clubs, schools, etc., 
at Bow, Battersea, Barnsbury, Edmonton, Greenv/ich, 
Holloway, Hornsey, Islington, Kilburn, Leytonstone, 
Paddington, etc. 



II. — A cquisitions. 
Egyptian : — 

i. A large and miscellaneous collection of Egyptian 
antiquities, consisting of about one thousand objects, 
belonging chiefly to the Vlth and Xlth dynasties, 
from the excavations carried out by the 'jTrustees in 

P % 



52 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

the neighbourhood of Asyut in Upper Egypt. Among 
these may be mentioned : — 

1. A fine blue paste cylinder seal inscribed with the 

names and titles of Pepi I. Vlth dynasty, B.C. 
3300. 

2. Light blue faience spiral bugle bead. Vlth dynasty. 

3. Two button seals. VTth dynasty. 

4. Large rectangular wooden coffin of Neb-hetep, an 

official of the temple of Pepi I. Vlth dynasty. 

5-8. A group of four rectangular wooden coffins of 
Neferu-aker, Senkeku, the sculptor, and Hunnu 
and Khuat, private persons. All these are painted 
in white, or light yellow, and bear hieroglyphic 
inscriptions painted in green or blue. "Vlth 
dynasty. About B.C. 3300. 

9, 10. Two coffins, of unusual dimensions, which were 
made for the Princess Atchni, and Kareru the 
sculptor. The occupants of these coffins appear 
to have been buried in what is commonly called 
the " pre-natal position." Vlth dynasty. About 
B.C. 3300. 

11-18. A group of well-carved, and well-proportioned 
wooden figures, of various sizes, representing the 
servants, male and female, of the occupants of the 
tombs. Vlth dynasty. About B.C. 3300. 

19. A group of limbs of wooden figures of men and 
women, at the joints of which are incised figures 
of protecting gods. Chiefly of the Vlth dynasty. 
About B.C. 3300. 

20, 21. Two complete wooden models of bakeries, with 
figures kneading dough and tending the furnaces. 
Vlth dynasty, B.C. 3300. 

22, 23. Two turtle shells. From a tomb of the Vlth 
dynasty. These appear to be the oldest known 
turtle shells of the Dynastic Period, and it is 
probable that they were buried in the tomb in 
connection with the belief referred to in the Book 
of the Dead (Chap. CLXI.) where it is said, '' Ra 
liveth, the turtle dieth." 

24-31. Eight models of alabaster vases. Vlth dynasty, 
B.C. 3300. 

32. A collection of twenty-six wooden head-rests, or 

"pillows." Vlth-XIth dynasties, B.C. 3300- 
2600. 

33. A large collection of earthenware vases, pots, 

saucers, jars, etc, of coarse make and various 
co)9urs. Vl-XIth dynasties, B.C. 3800-2600, 



JEGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. oo 

34. A series of limestone tables for offerings, or altars, 

some of which are inscribed. Vl-XIth dynasties, 
B.C. 8300—2600. 

35. A collection of terra-cotta dishes filled with models 

of joints of meat, bread-cakes, and vases of 
wine, beer, unguents, etc. Vl-XIth dynasties, 
B.C. 3300-2600. 

36, 37. Two acacia wood bows, with bundles of flint-tipped 
reed, or bamboo, arrows, and an archer's wrist 
guard, and gut for stringing the bows. Vl-XIth 
dynasty, B.C. 3300-2600. 

38-42. Models of wooden boats, with crews. Xlth dynasty, 
B.C. 2600. 

43. A painted stone stele of Uapai, an ofiicial, Xlth 

dynasty, B.C. 2600. 

44. Rectangular wooden coffin of Ankhf-aker, painted in 

blue and yellow. Xlth dynasty, B.C. 2600. 

45. Painted wooden box for holding a set of '• Canopic " 

jars; fine example. Xlth dynasty, B.C. 2600. 

46. A wooden grating for placing under the mummy 

in a coffin. A very rare object. Xlth dynasty. 
B.C. 2600. 

47. A miscellaneous collection of objects, scarabs, 

porcelain and glass beads, amulets, figures of 
gods, etc. Xlth and following dynasties. 

48. A large painted terra-cotta vase decorated in blue 

with figures of hawks, etc. XlXth dynasty, 
B.C. 1300. 

49. A group of mummied Apis calves, birds, snake, etc. 

XVlllth to XXVlth dynasty. 

50. Twenty-six fragments of papyri inscribed in the 

hieratic character. XlX-XXth dynasty. 

51. A basket-work sieve, and a miscellaneous group of 

sandals, ropes, baskets, etc., of various periods. 

52-53. Two rudely painted coffins, daubed with mud, late 
Gr?eco-Roman Period. 

54. About 50 fragments of papyrus inscribed in Greek 
and Coptic. 

ii. — 1. Four fragments of limestone reliefs painted with 
portrait heads. From D^r al-Bahari. Xlth dynasty. 

2. A group of fragments of reliefs, with specimens of 

fine work. From Der al-Bahari. Xlth dynasty. 

3. Lower portion of a seated granite figure of a scribe. 

XVIIlth dynasty. 



64! ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

4. A group of 12 terra-cotta tables of offerings, with 

models of offerings upon them. Archaic Period. 
B.C. 3800. 

5. A pair of wooden paddles from the funeral barge 

of Amen-hetep II., B.C. 1500. The blades are in 
the form of hands, and the ends terminate in 
hawk's heads. XVIIIth dynasty. 
6-9. Four painted wooden boxes for ushabtiu figures ; 
one is inscribed in Demotic, and another has a 
figure of a jackal upon it. B.C. 500-300. 
10. A group of terra-cotta models for making jewellery, 
pendants, figures, etc. 
11-13. Three hard stone vases. Archaic Period. B.C. 
3800. 
14. Five fragments of vases inscribed with the names 
of Thothmes I., King of Egypt. About B.C. 1600. 

lo. A large bronze figure of Isis suckling Horus. From 
Bubastis. XXVIth dynasty, B.C. 600. 

16. Bronze vase, with a hinged cover. Late Period. 

17. Bronze statue of an official holding a figure of 

Osiris. Late Period. 

18. Bronze ring, with scarab. XXVIth dynasty. 

19. Portion of a slab from a building inscribed with 

the name of Ankh-nes-nefer-ab-Ra, daughter 
of Psammetichus II. and Taphauath. XXVIth 
dynasty. B.C. 600. 

20. Inscribed angle post from the sarcophagus of 

Ptahmes. Ptolemaic Period. 

21. Bronze figure of Eros, wearing the Crowns of the 

South and the North. Graeco-Roman Period. 

22. A collection of 1600 ostraka, inscribed in Greek, 

Demotic, and Coptic. The Greek ostraka contain 
chiefly receipts for taxes, and the Coptic extracts 
from the Scriptures, letters, etc. 

23. Four Coptic stelas, on one of which are sculp- 

tured the figures of two saints. IXth or Xtli 
century A.D. 
iii. — 1. A small stone figure of Amenartas, the daughter 
of Kashta, the grandson of Piankhi, the Sudani 
King of Egypt, and high priestess of Amen-Ra 
at Thebes. She appears with the attributes of 
Isis and Hathor. Fine work. XXVIth dynasty. 
B.C. 600. 

2. Portions of the bronze framework of a door of the 

temple of Amen-Ra at Thebes. B.C. 1200. 

3. A wooden footstool, the place for the feet being 

made of twisted palm fibre plaited. A rare object. 
XITth dynasty. From Kurna. 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 05 

4. Ivory plaque inscribed with the prenomen of Amen- 

era-hat. From Kurna. Xllth dynasty. 

5. Half of a large granite bowl which was made for 

the official Tehuti-mes, who flourished under King 
Amen-hetep II. and Thothmes IV. B.C. 1500. 

6. Limestone stele sculptured with the figure of the 

deceased kneeling before a jackal standard. Below 
are cut figures of 54 jackals, arranged in 9 lines, 
which take the place of the usual hieroglyphic 
inscription. Period uncertain. 

7. A bronze bolt, terminating in the head of a lion. 

Late Period. 

8. A collection of 1,181 scarabs, made of steatite, 

with white, drab, or yellow glaze, on which are 
cut hunting scenes, figures of animals, devices, 
monograms, designs, etc., which are peculiar to 
scarabs found in the Delta or Lower Egypt. The 
scarabs in this collection belong to all periods, 
but among them is an important group which was 
made between the Xllth and XVIIIth dynasties, 
and illustrates the method of scarab decoration 
under the Hyksos, or Shepherd Kings. 

9. A large seated granite figure of a King of Egypt, 

whose prenomen reads Ra-uatch-sekhem-taui, who 
reigned probably about B.C. 2000. It belongs to 
the period of the Xlllth or XlVth dynasty, and 
monuments of this King's reign are very rare. 

iv. — 1. A collection of 113 white and grey glazed steatite 
scarabs, amulets, plaques, etc., many of which are 
inscribed with royal names. Vlth to XXVIth 
dynasties. 

2. A gilded, inlaid bronze beard, from a mummy or 
mummy-case. XlXth dynasty. 

V. — 1. An amethyst ape, which formed the pendant of a 
necklace. Xllth dj^nasty. 

2. Four linen balls covered with papyrus and painted in 

imitation of the fruit of a tree. XVIIIth dynasty. 

3. Limestone stele on which are cut figures of 21 

ibises ; it appears to have been set up in memory 
of a number of sacred ibises which belonged to a 
temple. Late Period. 
4, 5. Limestone stelse sculptured with figures of deceased 
persons kneeling in adoration before jackal gods 
on standards ; examples of this class of antiquity 
are uncommon. 

6. Stele sculptured with a scene representing Amasis 
11. presenting an estate to Ra and Isis, and dated 
in the first year of his reign. XXVIth dynasty. 



56 AdOouNts, Etc., of the British iviusEtJM. 

7. Stele of Peta-Nefer-hetep. Ptolemaic Period. 

8. A collection of 655 scarabs, amulets, plaques, etc., 

of all kinds. Vlth to XXVIth dynasties. 

9. Painted wooden ushahtiu box of Shepsmes-en- 

khensu, a priestess. XXVIth dynasty. 
10. A large leaden cross, set up to commemorate the 
monks Macarius, Severus, Thote, Shenuti, and 
others in the year 650 of the Era of the Martyrs, 
i.e., A.D. 934. The letters, figures, etc., are in 
relief. A rare object. 

vi. — 1. A large, massive " false door " from the mastaha 
tomb of Asa-ankh, a high official who held the 
rank of Smer-uat and Utcheb, or chief high-priest 
of Horus, under King Tet-ka-Ra, who reigned 
about B.C. 3330. This very important object is 
probably the finest example of its class in Europe. 
It is covered with texts which record the titles 
and offices of the deceased, and is of value for 
purposes of grammar and philology. Vth dynasty. 

2. The base and capital of a granite column which 

was one of the four that supported the roof of the 
portico in front of the P5a'amid of King Unas. 
About B.C. 3000. 

3. A massive grey granite sarcophagus of the " anthro- 

poid " class, of Uah-ab-l^a, a controller of the 
revenue of the district of Memphis, and scribe of 
the taxes. The inscriptions are archaic in character, 
and many of the words are spelt as in the texts 
written under the Vth dynasty. The deceased pro- 
bably fiourished in the reign of Psammetichus I., 
about B.C. 640. XXVIth dynasty. 

5. Hard stone statue of Uah-en-Menthu, holding a 

tablet inscribed with a hymn to the Sun-god. 
The deceased was high-priest of Menthu, and 
presided over the administration of the temples 
at Thebes during the reign of Hatshepset, about 
B.C. 1600. From Thebes. XVIIIth dynasty. 

6. A gilded coffin of Hent-Mehit, a lady of high rank, 

and priestess of Amen-Ra, the great god of Thebes, 
and gilded mummy covering, with figures of the 
gods cut in hollow-work, and backed with a layer 
of the purple linen of Egypt. From Thebes. 
XXIInd dynasty. About B.C. 1040. 
Assyrian : — 

i. — 1. Bronze figures of the Elamite King, Kudur-Mabug, 
who reigned over Elam about B.C. 2,000, carrying 
on his head a vessel filled, probably, with off'erings, 
and performing a ceremony which seems to have 
been similar to that performed by the canephoros 



Egyptian and assyrIan antiquities. 5? 

among the Greeks and Egyptians, On the body 
of the figure is cut, in two columns, a text which 
states that Kudur-Mabug, the Governor of Western 
Elam, and his son, Eim-Sin, King of Larsa, in 
Southern Babylonia, built a great temple, which 
was " like a mountain," in honour of the god 
Ninni, to ensure the preservation of their lives. 
The inscription ends with a prayer to Ninni to 
grant long life to the father and the son, and 
established rule, and the wielding of royal power 
for ever. 

2. A " Kudurru," or Boundary Stone, inscribed with a 
text recording a grant of certain cultivated land, 
situated in Southern Babylonia, to Gula-eresh, by 
Eanna-shum-iddina, Governor of the Persian Gulf, 
the son of Daiam-Bel. This land was situated on 
the bank of the Edina Canal, near the town of 
Edina, in the province of the Sea-Land. On one side 
of it was the property of the tribe of Iddiatu, and 
on the other the land of Amel-Marduk. The estate 
of Gula-eresh was carefully measured by the 
governor of the city of Edina and others, and 
duly registered; Gula-eresh had this stone cut 
and inscribed, and the great gods set it up as a 
witness. On the upper portion of the stone are 
cut the emblems of the great gods, and on the 
reverse are adjui-ations to various officials and 
others who are called upon to respect the claim of 
Gula-eresh, and to do no injury to the stone, his 
title-deed. These are followed by a series of 
curses upon anyone who should harm or conceal 
the stone, the gods Anu, Enlil, Ea, Nin-makh, 
Sin, Nabu, Gula, and Ninib being invoked. About 
B.C. 1100. 

A collection of small stamps and seals from Asia 
Minor : — 

1. Flat, circular seal inscribed with " Hittite '* 

characters. In the centre, on both the obverse 
and reverse, are four large characters which 
probably give the name of the owner of the seal. 
Round these, on each side, is an inscription in 
smaller characters. 

2. Bronze seal, inscribed with " Hittite " characters 

within a line border ; it is provided with a ring 
for suspension. 

3. Steatite scaraboid, on which is cut the figure of 

an ibex leaping. 

4. Cylinder seal, with three divisions, in each of 

which is cut a seated human figure, with both 
hands raised in, adoration, libation vase, etc. 



5^ 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



5. Steatite semi-circular seal, on which are cut 

figures of serpents, line patterns, and bosses 
arranged symmetrically. 

6. Haematite seal, on which is cut a figure seated 

by a table of offerings ; near it are divine 
emblems. 

7. Steatite stamp on which are cut heads of bulls 

and ibexes arranged symmetrically. 

HlMYARITIC : — 

1. Portions of an inscription recording the dedication of 

a building to a god. B.C. 700. 

2. Bronze lamp, with a curved handle in the form of an 

oryx, or gazelle. Late Period (Roman ?). 

3. Bronze censer, on stand, with cover. Roman Period. 

4. Bronze handle of a large vessel for holding water. 

About A.D. 250. 

5. Bronze handle of a vessel, ornamented with flutings 

and raised rings ; it terminates in the head of a ram 
with horns curving downwards by the sides of the 
face. 

6. Bronze figure of a camel. 

7. Portions of a face from a statue. Late Period. This 

group of Himyaritic objects came from ancient sites 
in the Hadhramaut, in Yaman, Arabia. 

8. Lower portion of a limestone figure of a man. Period 

unknown. 



III. — Presents. 

i. — 1. Six large, and 200 small fragments of the walls and 
pilasters of the shrine of Kemsit, a priestess of 
Hathor, sculptured with scenes representing King 
Menthu-hetep II. and his Queen Aashait making 
offerings to the gods, and Kemsit receiving offer- 
ings, etc. Xlth dynasty, B.C. 2500. 

2. Four fragments of lily pillars and one capital from 

the shrine of Kemsit. Xlth dynasty, B.C. 2500. 

3. Slab sculptured in relief with the winged disk and 

uraei, and the head of King Menthu-hetep, 
probably from the shrine of Queen Aashait. 
Xlth dynasty, B.C. 2500. 

4. A group of specimens of hieroglyphics sculptured 

in shrines at Der al-Bahari in high relief. Xlth 
dynasty, B.C. 2500. 

5. A series of slabs with reliefs illustrating the cam- 

paign of Menthu-hetep II. against the rebels of 
the Aamu. Xlth dynasty, B.C. 2500. 



Egyptian and Assyrian antiquities. 59 

6. Slab with relief representing a Libyan prisoner. 

7. Slab with relief representing the presentation by 

the King of a collar of honour to the chancellor 
Henket. 

8, 9. Fragments of slabs on which are cut the names of 
Henket and Kheti, chancellors of Menthu-hetep II. 

10. Fragments of sandstone reliefs from the western hall 

of the temple of Menthu-hetep II. 

11. Two pieces of octagonal columns, on which are cut 

the cartouches of Menthu-hetep II. 

12. Limestone relief, representing the King being 

embi'aced by the god Ra. From the cella of the 
Temple of Menthu-hetep 11. 

13. Slab with relief representing a boat on the Nile. 

14. Historical inscription of Menthu-hetep II. 

15. Pavement slab from the temple of Menthu-hetep II., 

on which are cut in outline a pilgrim's foot and the 
name Hui. 

16. Three wooden figures of servants, a model of a cow- 

hide shield, a group of models of vases, a boat, 
model of an ox bound for sacrifice, broken bows, 
with wood arrow-tips, and a boomerang. From 
the tomb sanctuary of Menthu-hetep II. 

17. Cover and fragments of a " Canopic " jar of Menthu- 

hetep II., and a piece of his coffin. 

Nos. 1-17 are of the Xlth dynasty, B.C. 2500, 
and are from Der al-Bahari. 

18. Models of vases, specimen of sent wood, model bolt, 

and model sekheTti. Xlth dynasty. 

19. A group of miscellaneous fragments of reliefs. Xlth- 

XVIIIth dynasties. 

20. Clay impression of a seal. Xllth dynasty. 

21. Sandstone fragment with the name of Heru-meri- 

taui. Xlllth dynasty, B.C. 2100. 

22. Fragment of an inscription mentioning Sebek-em- 

saf, a King of the Xlllth dynasty. 

23. Portion of a stele with the figure of Queen Aahmes- 

Nefert-ari. 

24. Portion of a granite plinth with the name of 

Thothmes I. in an unusual form. 

25. Stone fragment with the name of Khebt-neferu, a 

princess. 

26. Fragment of a relief with figures of soldiers 

marching and carrying branches. From the 
temple of Hatshepset. 



65 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE JBRlTlSH MiQSEUM. 

27. Granite figure of the priest Tchaui, with a relief 

showing the sacred cow of Hathor. 

28. Slices of limestone, on which are drawings of a dog 

and a girl. 

29. Votive cloth, painted with a scene representing the 

worship of Hathor. 

30. Bones of a sacred cow of Hathor. 

31. Large ear amulet in red pottery. 

32. Pottery figures of a man and an ape. 

33. Large shell and pieces of card, and model of a 

flower. 

34. Specimens of blue glazed porcelain bowls, etc. 

35. Specimens of painted red ware vases. 

Nos. 23-35 are of the XVIIIth dynasty. 

36. Four jar-sealings. XVIIIth and XlXth dynasties. 

37. Two funerary cones. XVIIIth and XlXth dynasties. 

38. Three ushabtiu figures. XVIIIth to XXVIth 

dynasty. 

39. Three vases. XVIIIth to XXVIth dynasties. 

40. Specimens of hieratic graffiti. XlXth dynasty. 

41. A mat. XlXth dynasty. 

42. Embalmer's bag of natron. XlXth dynasty. 

43. Triple brush and mallet. XlXth dynasty. 

44. Stone trough. XlXth dynasty. 

45. Torso of a figure of Osiris wrapped in a fringed 

mantle. Later Period. 

46. One hundred and twenty-six Hieratic, Demotic, and 

Coptic ostraka. 

All the above are from Der al-Bahari. 

47. Small glass human head. 

48. Green glass bottle. 

49. Wooden figure of a soldier. 

50. Six Greek ostraka. Ilnd to Vlth cent. a.d. 

51. Reed cross. Coptic Period. 

Nos. 47-51 are from Behnesa (Oxyrrhynchus). 
Presented by the Egypt Exploration Fund. 

ii. — 1. Bronze figure of the Bull Mer-ur, or Mnevis. 
XXIInd dynasty. 

2. Bronze figure of Ptah, on the pedestal of Maat. 

XXIInd dynasty. 

3. Bronze figure of Bast, holding an aegis. XXIInd 

dynasty. 



EGYPTIAN AND ASSYRIAN ANTIQUITIES. 61 

4. Bronze figure of Thoth, ibis-headed. XXIInd 

dynasty. 

5. Bronze figure of the goddess Neheb-kau. XXIInd 

dynasty. 

6. Bronze figure of Harpokrates, with the attributes 

of Amen. XXIInd dynasty. 

7. Bronze figure of a seated cat. XXIInd dynasty. 

Presented by the daughters of the late Samuel 
Sharpe, Egyptologist. 

8. An alabaster slab sculptured in relief with a figure 

of an eagle-headed god standing by a sacred tree, 
and inscribed with a historical text of Ashur- 
natsir-pal, king of Assyria, B.C. 885-860. From 
the palace of Ashur-natsir-pal at Nimrud { Calah). 
Presented hy W. Howard, esq. 

9. Wooden figure. 

10. Wooden head-rest, or pillow. Xllth dynasty. 

Presented by J. H. Skilbeck, esq. 

11. Limestone head from a statue at Palmyra. 

Presented by 0. P. Devey, esq., 

H.B.M.'s Consul at Damascus. 

12. Porcelain figures of Bes and Nefer-Atmu. XXVIth 

dynasty (Nos. 43,058, 43,378). 

13. Steatite figures of Bes and Nefer-Atmu. XXVIth 

dynasty (Nos. 43,379, 43,397). 

Presented anonymously, 

E. A. Wallis Budge, 



62 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEaM. 



Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities. 
I. — Arrangement, Cataloguing, Sc. 

In the Terracotta Room the new wall cases on the north 
side have been finished, and two pedestal cases fitted ; the col- 
lection of terracottas has been re-arranged and in great part 
remounted. The arrangement of the Room of Greek and 
Roman Life has been completed. All the cases in the Bronze 
Room have been refitted, and the bronzes re-arranged, and 
the mounting of many of the larger pieces has been altered. 
Wall-cases in the Fourth Vase Room have been fitted for 
the exhibition of Roman pottery, and the Roman lamps have 
been moved from the Terracotta Room to a table-case in this 
room. The Greek statue from Trentham has been set up in 
the Phigaleian Room. In the Elgin Room many plaster casts 
of fragments of the sculptures of the Parthenon which are 
in Athens have been fitted in their places ; the glass covering 
the Parthenon frieze has been removed and refixed ; and a 
table-case has been altered for the exhibition of sculptural 
fragments. Two restored capitals and a column-base from 
the Temple of Artemis have been moved from the Archaic 
Room to the Ephesus Room and plaster columns have been 
built up beneath the capitals. The new wall-cases in the 
Greek Ante-Room have been completed, and the collection 
of smaller sculptures in stone and marble arranged in them. 
The restored columns from the doorway of the " Treasury of 
Atreus " at Mycenae have been fixed in position in the wall 
of the Archaic Room. 

The collection of casts of Greek and Roman sculpture has 
been transferred from the Victoria and Albert Museum at 
South Kensington to the British Museum, and is now stored 
in the Mausoleum Room and the basements pending the 
construction of a special gallery for its proper exhibition. 

The antiquities from the excavations at Ephesus, which 
were temporarily deposited in the British Museum, have 
been returned to the Imperial Ottoman Museum at Con- 
stantinople, excepting some duplicates and pieces of minor 
importance which were allotted to the Museum by the 
Turkish Government. 

Sixteen new moulds have been made from the sculptures. 
Sixteen marble vases, a marble head, 39 statuettes, a relief, 
2 terracotta slabs, and many architectural sculptures have 
been mounted on pedestals of stone or marble ; 281 terra- 
cottas, 13 bronzes, and many miscellaneous objects have been 
mounted on wooden blocks. 

Six alabaster figures, 37 bronzes, 13 ivories, 186 leaden 
seals, 129 terracottas, 66 vases, and various other antiquities 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 63 

have been cleaned or repaired. Thirty-five imperfect bronzes 
have been completed by the restoration of the missing parts. 

One thousand six hundred and nineteen objects have been 
registered, 1,647 numbered ; 680 labels have been written, 
and 356 labels printed in the Department. 

The Catalogue of Finger Rings has been published, and 
a new edition of the Guide to the Department has been 
issued. The publication of the British Museum Excavations 
at Ephesus has been prepared for press. 

Progress has been made with the Catalogues of the First 
Vase Room, the Roman Pottery, and the Gold Ornaments, 
with the Guide to the Room of Greek and Roman Life, and 
with a new edition of the Guide to the Sculptures of the 
Parthenon. 

Students. — The number of visits to the Students' Room 
for purposes of research has been 428 ; 1,565 other visits to 
the Staff for purposes of inquiry, and 1,206 attendances of 
students in the Sculpture Galleries have been entered. 

II. — A cquisitions. 
By Purchase. 

I. — Objects in Gold. 

1. Eight stamped plaques pierced for attachment, one of 
them ornamented also with filigree work. 

These resemble the primitive treasure found in the recent 
Museum excavations at Ephesus, and are probably from that 
site. 

2. Pair of earrings in the shape of clubs terminating m 
lions' masks, to which are attached pendent amphorae made 
of black and white glass and gold. The clubs are prolonged 
at each end by twisted wire, forming a loop to fit over the 
ears. 

3. Sixteen stamped bracteate plaques, of which fourteen 
are copied from coin-types ; they include pieces of Olbia, 
Naxos, Magna Graecia, and Rome. 

4. Fifteen amulets or pendants, one set with a plasma 
gem, another with a sard, and another with a sardonyx 
cameo representing Eros leaning on a column. 

5. Necklace of 106 gold and 52 glass beads, strung in such 
a way as to suggest a bead-and-reel pattern. 

2-5 from Olbia. 

7. Ring, set with a golden sard intaglio : a youthful head 
of Hermes with caduceus. Roman, 1st century B.C. Found 
in a tomb in the island of Lipari. {Journ. Hell. Stud., VII., 
p. 51 ; Brit, Mus, Catalogue of Finger Rings, p. xiii., 
No. 1655.) 



64 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

II. — Silver. 

1. Ring, with intaglio design carved in the bezel : a girl 
dancing, carrying an amphora on her shoulder. 

A specimen of modern imitation of the antique. 

2. Spoon, the handle turned in plain mouldings. From 
Egypt. 

3. Bezel of a ring, carved with an intaglio of Eros riding 
on a dolphin. It has been set with two gold studs, of which 
one only remains. Greek, 4th century B.C. From Khodes. 

III. — Bronze. 

1. Bell of unusually large size, with an iron clapper. It 
was probably a cattle-bell. Said to have been found at 
Pompeii. 

2. Statuette of an Augur, robed perhaps in the trahea 
and holding a lituus in his right hand ; the left has held 
something which is now missing, perhaps an ancile. (Com- 
pare Virgi], Aeneid, VII., 187.) 

The figure is cast solid, and seems to be Etruscan work of 
the early part of the 5th century B.C. Formerly in the 
Forman Collection. {Forman Sale Catalogue, June 1899, 
No. 55, pi. II.). 

3. Statuette of Aphrodite, nude, holding up in her right 
hand a wreath or cestus, and wearing a crown of flowers. 
The figure is of unusually large size for a bronze of this 
motive, and stands on an antique pedestal. From Jerusalem. 

4. A snake, crawling ; probably a votive offering. 

5. A buckle and a clasp, the latter in the form of a 
crouching animal. Part of the leathern belt is still attached 
to the clasp. From Olbia. 

6. A kantharos, of the best Greek period ; similar to those 
found at Galaxidi. From Anactorion. 

7. A bistoury of rare form, with a slotted shaft. 

8. Statuette of Aphrodite holding a wreath, and wearing 
a headdress in the shape of a dove. 

9. A circular brooch-plate with sunk patterns in red, 
white, and blue enamel : daisies and geometrical designs. 

10. Spoon with handle terminating in the form of a stag's 
antlers. 

8-10 from Egypt. 

11. Statuette of an athlete scraping himself with a strigil. 
Greek work, of about 500 B.C. ; an interesting early example 
of the type afterwards made famous in the Apoxyomenos 
of Lysippos. 

12. Bust of a human figure wearing a headdress composed 
of five vertical reeds and a ball, and a twisted necklace 
with pendant ; the hair is braided, and in the hands are a, 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. G5 

cone and a cornucopia. The work is barbaric. From Syria. 
Formerly in the Gilbert Collection. (Vente Serrure, 24t, 1, 
1903, pi. I. Reinach, Rep. de la Stat, III., p. 267, No. 9, 
where it is described as a " Syrian Priest.") 

13. A vase, engraved with patterns which show survivals 
of Greek decorative motives. From Kaalal Shergat. 

IV. — Iron. 

1. Knife with bone handle, on which are carved reliefs of 
a dog chasing a stag and a man hunting a lion. 

2. Knife with wooden handle, on the end of which is 
carved a human head. The blade was protected by a sewn 
leather sheath, which is entirely preserved. 

1-2 from Egypt. 

V. — Lead. 

1. A series of stamped and pierced reliefs, representing 
boucrania, figures of Heracles, Victory, &c. 

2. Hand-mirror, of which the reflector is a convex glass 
disc ; in miniature size, probably a model or a child's toy. 

1-2 from Olbia. 

3. The lid of a vase, ornamented with two wolves' heads 
on opposite sides. From Egypt. 

VI.— Gems. 

1. Carnelian intaglio : a girl carrying amphora and dish, 
approaching a statue of Eros on a column. From the ruins 
of a Roman building near Mabeul, Tunisia. 

2. Smoky quartz intaglio : Eros kneeling on a rock and 
shooting with bow and arrows. Aphrodite standing behind 
him. From Halos in Thessaly. 

3. Amethyst intaglio of large size and convex shape : a 
portrait of the Emperoi Constantius II. The stone is in 
remarkably good condition, being only slightly chipped at 
the edge. It is an admirable example of the best gem- 
engraving of the late period, of which very few specimens 
have survived. 

4. Agate scaraboid intaglio : a centaur carrying off a 
nymph. Greek, 5th century B.C. ; a fine gem of the best 
period. 

5. Red jasper intaglio : a shepherd with a goat at a tree, 
in which is a bird's nest. 

6. Four roughly worked carnelian gems ; one is engraved 
with a satyr holding a bow, and another with two goats at a 
tree, in the style of the archaic "island" gems ; the others 
have no design. From Ulbia. 

7. Amethyst intaglio : the signs of the Zodiac and heads 
representing the Days of the week, arranged round a head of 
Helios. 

0.109. E 



66 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

8. Sardonyx intaglio : Heracles running, with sword and 
spear. 

7 — 8 from Egypt, 

9. Sard intaglio : a rabbit within the hoop of a finger- 
ring, a bust, two Cupids, two cranes, and an inscription — 
FELIC [Felic(is) .^J. 

10. Carnelian scarab intaglio : a soldier on horseback, 
accompanied by a large war-dog ; beneath, a lion's mask. 
Probably Ionic work, of the 6th century B.C. From Samos. 
(There is a gem of similar design, but inferior execution, in 
the Hermitage Museum at St. Petersburg : Furtwangler, 
Antike Gemmen, pi. VI.TI., 63.) 

YIL—Jet 

1. Three carved pendants, with loops of bronze wire for 
suspension. They are respectively in the form of an altar, 
a pigeon, and a rhinoceros embracing an elephant. From 
Olbia. 

VIII. — Bone and Ivory. 

1. Statuette of a draped woman, of minute size ; the 
hands held stiffly by the sides. 

This statuette resembles the primitive ivory figures found 
in the recent Museum excavations at Ephesus, and is probably 
from that site. (B.M. Excavations at Ephesus, pi. XXIV., 
fig. 5.) 

2. Handle of cylindrical shape, carved in relief with 
figures of a lion and a deer, both galloping. Ionic Greek, 
5th century B.C. 

3. A series of carvings, including a pointed oval plaque 
with a relief representing a Dionysiac ceremony, a grotesque 
head, a pin surmounted by a woman's head in a turreted 
crown, and other pins. 

IX. — Marble and Stone. 

1. A group of Heracles and the Hydra, representing a 
rare version of the myth. The Hydra is shown as a serpent, 
coiled round the left leg of Heracles, but terminating above 
in the bust of a woman, from whose head smaller snakes 
issue. This type does not appear in art until the Roman 
period ; it is found in reliefs decorating sarcophagi, but only 
two other instances are known of groups in the round, while 
this example is the clearest at present known. (For the 
treatment of the subject, see Urlichs in Gorlitz Verhand- 
lungen, 1890, p. 312.) 

2. Laver consisting of a bowl, decorated inside with a 
Gorgon's head and outside with signs of the zodiac, and 
supported by four legs, each of which bears a sculptured 
panel in the neo-attic style ; the whole stands in a floriated 
basin which rests on lions' heads. Roman, 1st century B.C. 
{Trentham Sale Cat, 17 July 1907, No. 855.) 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 67 

3. Rectangular altar, the sides decorated with floral 
festoons which are suspended from rams' heads on the angles. 
At one end a bowl, at the other a jug. Roman, early 
Imperial. (Trentkam Sale Gat., No. 857.) 

4. Statue of a woman, life-size, closely wrapped in drapery 
and standing in a mourning attitude. On the plinth a 
late Roman inscription, P • MAXIMINA • SEXTILI • CLEM- 
ENTIS. Greek, 4th century B.C. (Burlington Magazine, 
1908, p. 331 ; Trentham Sale Gat, No. 858 ) 

5. Laver consisting of a fluted basin, resting on two lions' 
legs, which terminate above in wings, and lions' heads, and 
on a central column which is sculptured as a palm-trunk ; 
these stand on an oval platform, which is separated from a 
richly carved plinth by six blacks in the shape of human 
heads. Roman, 1st century B.C. (Trentham Sale Gat., 
No. 856.) 

2-5 from the Duke of Sutherland's collection at Trentham 
Hall. 

6. Stele with relief of a youth holding a bird. Inscribed 
2TPATIOS. 

7. Stele, upper part, with relief of the head of a woman 
within a shrine. Inscribed lEPOKAEIA NAYZINIKOY EK 
KEPAMEHN. 

8. Stele, fragment, with relief of the upper part of a 
bearded man. 

9. Mould in black stone for casting a graduated series of 
four weights, numbered successively A, B, A, H. 

10. Fragment of painted and carved stone architrave. 
From Tel-el-Yehudiyeh. It forms part of a series of tri- 
glyphs and metopes ; in the latter is sculptured an Atef crown 
in relief. 

X. — Terracotta. 

1. Statuette of a goddess of archaistic style. 

2. Statuette of woman with fan. 

3. Girl seated. 

1-3 are specimens of modern imitation of the antique. 

4. Nereid riding on a sea-horse with the helmet of 
Achilles in her hands. Painted in bright colours. Attic 
work, 4th century B.C. 

5. Group of two gladiators fighting. 

6. Boy draped in a long robe covered with raised dots, 
which is probably meant to represent a skin. 

7. Group of a woman seated and a boy reclining on a couch 
at a banquet. Fine modelling on a minute scale. 

8. Comic actor draped as a woman, a fruit in his left han«J 
his face covered with his right. 

E 2 



68 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

9. Comic male figure, nude, holding up a purse in his left 
hand and gesticulating. 

10. Two grotesque figures of hunchbacks, one holding a 
dagger, and the other a lamp. 

11. A youth holding a hare in his arm ; of large size, 
vividly painted. 

12. Persephone wearing a high stephane and holding a 
chain, of fabric similar to the preceding figure. 

13. Group of an old schoolmaster teaching a boy to read 
from a scroll. (Lecuyer collection, No. 81.) 

14. Comic actor wearing a long fringed cloak. 

15. Victorious athlete holding a branch of palm ; he leans 
against a terminal figure, at the foot of which is a vase. 

16. Aphrodite draped and holding an apple in her right 
hand. 

17. A series of 43 heads which have been broken from 
statuettes. These are all of fine style and are the work 
probably of a school which flourished at Smyrna or one of 
the neighbouring cities in the 4th century B.C. They include 
types of the styles of Polycleitos, Praxiteles, and Lysippos ; a 
head of Ares may perhaps go back to the lost work of Scopas, 
and an archaistic bust of Hermes recalls that of Alcamenes. 
Bowyer Sale (Christie's, Feb. 16, 1906), No. 214. 

18. Model of a circular building, perhaps an oven, with a 
figure of an actor standing in a niche in front. 

19. Eagle with wreath in beak, standing on a houcranion ; 
the whole on a column. 

20. Aphrodite with Eros on her shoulders, on a base with 
relief of Erotes mixing wine. 

21. Two grotesque phallic figures in short skirts. 

22. Four tragic masks'and two palmettes in white plaster, 
painted ; these have perhaps formed part of the decoration of 
a sarcophagus. 

18-22 from Olbia. 

23. Eros flying, posed so as to indicate an upward motion. 

24. Eros, with golden wings and pink drapery, flying. 

25. Youth holding a whelp in his arms ; a wolf standing 
at liis feet ; he wears on elaborate head dress. 

26. Boy wearing Phrygian cap and playing pan-pipes- 
From Amphipolis. 

27. Goddess of archaic style, holding a ring or wreath ; 
painted black and red. At the back is a panel, which is 
pierced for suspension. Terracottas of this style have been 
found in Cyprus. From Asia Minor. 

28. Seated girl holding a bird, which nestles at her neck, 
and a bunch of grapes. From Trebizond. 

29. Seal-impression : the statue of a divinity with two 
winged figures hovering at its head ; below, a ladder and an 



ORfiEK AND ROMA.N ANTlQUll'IJES. 69 

amphora. The design may be connected with the statue of 
Jupiter at Heliopolis, as repi-esented in the coin-types of that 
place. From Rhodes. 

30. Comic actor in a white hooded tunic and yellow 
trousers. 

31. Old man seated, draped. Fine and minute work. 

32. Woman seated, holding an infant. 

33. Woman standing. 

34. Horse laden with faggots and ridden by a boy. 

32-34 are figures of primitive style, from, Boeotia. 

XI. — Pottery. 

1. Three Roman lamps : a sea-scene with harbour ; a bull 
struggling with three men ; a Satyr's mask. 

2. Vase in shape of two Cupids Avrestling. 

A specimen of modern imitation of the antique. 

3. Kylix of Mycenaean style ; design of two goats springing 
up at a tree. 

4. Amphora of unusual form, with geometric decoration. 
From Boeotia. 

5. Kantharos of Boeotian style : grotesque designs of a 
head of Athena, cock and hens, in white on black. 

6. Pyxis, red-figure ware ; women at play ; one of them is 
juggling with five balls, and another has a curious frame 
which is perhaps for weaving or needlework. On the ground 
is a bird in a cage. 

7. Vase in shape of Eros riding on a panther. 

8. Vase in shape of a winged figure with a tambourine, 
dancing. 

9. A series of vases of Pontic style, in the shapes of 
grotesque male heads, Seilenos on a wine-skin, a crouching 
male figure, a horse's head, a lion, and a dog. 

10. Amphora, late imitation of black-figure ware : a combat 
of two men, and a footrace. 

11. Two amphorae, black ware, with twisted handles and 
plastic ornaments. 

12. Bowl with patterns in relief outside : vines, goats, 
birds ; and in the centre the head of a goddess in a turreted 
crown, inscribed TTOIAOC (?). 

13. Cylindrical receptacle with rings hung underneath, on 
a stand supported by lion's feet. 

9-13 from Olbia. 

14. Krater, red-figure ware ; Dionysos, Persephone, and 
their attendants. The subjects are perhaps connected with 
the celebration of the Mysteries. 



70 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

15. Kylix, red-figure ware, signed by the artist Pamphaios : 
on the exterior, footraces of armed men, and in the interior, 
an armed runner. 

16. Vase in the shape of Eros standing among flowers. 

17. Vase in the shape of a Maenad's head, hooded in a 
panther skin. Black ware. From Rhodes. 

18. Cup, Etruscan hucchero nero, with a frieze representing 
worshippers bringing offerings to seated figures. 

By Donation. 

I. — 1. Marble statuette of a boy holding a rabbit. Head 
and right arm wanting. Graeco-Roman. 

2. Marble capital of a Corinthian pilaster, enriched with 
a group of Leda and the swan. Late Roman. 

Acquired in Greece by the late Admiral Spratt ; 
and 'presented by Colonel W . Spratt-Bowring , r.e. 
II. — A series of antiquities from various sites in Crete, 
found in excavations conducted chiefly by the British School 
at Athens. 

1. A large number of vases, lamps, and pottery fragments 
with miscellaneous objects of the Neolithic Age, bone 
implements and stone vessels, from Palaikastro. 

2. Painted pottery, a lamp and statuette of a bull, from 
the Dictaean cave. 

3. Primitive pottery and stone objects, from Knossos, 

4. Very primitive votive off'erings in terracotta, from the 
sanctuary site of Petsofa. 

Presented by the Committee of the 
British School at Athens. 
III. — Plasma portrait bust of Agrippina the Elder in the 
fftyle of the early Empire. [Le Musee, 1905, p. 192, fig. (5 ; 
Burlington Magazine, 1907, p. 99.) 

Presented by an anonymous donor. 

IV. — 1. Terracotta statuette of a boy seated on a rock, 
v/ith a dog which leaps up at his side. 

2. Fragment of gold band, stamped with a maeander 
pattern. 

3. Fragment of ivory carved with a lotus pattern. 

2-3 from a tomb at Corinth. 

4. Fictile vase surmounted by a woman's head. 

5. Terracotta head of a girl wearing a coif. 

4-5 are specimens of modern imitation of the antique. 
Presented by M. Costis Lembessis. 
V. Fragment of Arretine M^are, with rivet showing an 
ancient method of repairing ; the rivet is in the form, of 
double dovetail. 

Presented by G. A. Simmons, Esq. 



GREEK AND ROMAN ANTIQUITIES. 71 

VI. Fragment of Attic red-figure ware, showing a woman 
holding her dress in her teeth while she fastens her girdle. 
From Naucratis. 

Presented hy D. G. Hogarth, Esq. 

VII. A series of 8,5 easts of fragments of the Pediments 
and Metopes of the Parthenon, taken from originals at 
Athens. 

Presented hy the Greek Government, through 

M. P. Kavvadias, Ephor-General 

of Antiquities at Athens. 

VIII. A series of objects from excavations at Behnesa. 

1. Blade bone of an ox, with accounts written in ink in 
Greek. 

2. Part of an ivory panel with the figure of a woman 
incised and coloured. 

3. Part of a bone cylinder with Europa riding on the bull, 
incised and coloured red. 

4. Bone bodkin. 

5. Bone head of youth, from a knife handle. 

6. Bronze netting needle and tweezers. 

7. Dog in blue and green faience, and three pieces of 
variegated glass for inlaying. 

8. Cross of twisted grass, paint-brush of reed and wool, 
and a brush made of bristles. 

9. Base of apottery bowl, with design of a parrot in bright 
colours. 

Presented hy the Committee of the 
Egypt Exploration Fund. 

IX. A series of antiquities forming part of those found 
in the excavations conducted by the British Museum on the 
site of the Artemision at Ephesus, in 1904-5. 

1. Gold and, Electrum. — A female statuette, and 5 hawks ; 
2 hawk-brooches and others; 10 pins and many pinheads, 
beads and pendants ; 25 catlings, and a large number of 
applique ornaments. 

2. Silver. — A male statuette, and 2 hawks ; bracelets and 
rings, pins, pinheads, beads, and pendants ; 22 earrings. 

3. Bronze. — Female statuette, a hawk, a duck, and a 
dolphin ; bracelets and rings, fibulae, earrings, pins, and a 
vase. 

4. Lead and Iron. — A bracelet and other pieces. 

5. Marhle. — A lamp, and many sculptured and archi- 
tectural fragments of the Temples. 

6. Terracotta. — Some statuettes and fragments, loom- 
weights, and spindle-whorls. 



72 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

7. Glass and Faience. — A hawk and a hawk's head, 
fragments of a bowl, beads, and spindle-whorls. 

8. Amber and Precious Stones. — Beads, pendants, seal- 
stones and fragments, mostly of crystal. 

9. Natural Bones and Shells. — Various specimens. 

10. Ivory. — Fragmentary statuettes of birds, a ilute, many 
pins, astragali, and plaques. 

11. Pottery. — A large series of fragments of early Greek 
wares. 

Presented by the Imperial OttoTiian Government. 

X. A stone pestle, found at Aquileia. 

Presented by Sir John Evans, k.c.b. 

XI. Seven drawings of Athens made by H. E. Ricardo 
between November 184.5 and February 1847. 

Presented by Halsey Ricardo, Esq. 

Cecil Sm,ith. 



BRITISH AND MEDI/EVAL ANTIQUITIES. 73 



Department of British and Medieval Antiquities and 
Ethnography. 

I. — Arrangemnent, Cataloguing, etc. 

Prehistoric Section. — Permanent labels have been pro- 
vided for British, French, and German neolithic flints. A 
new table-case has been placed in position near the model of 
Stonehenge, containing a similar model of the stone-circle 
known as Arbor Low, Derbyshire, excavated for the British 
Association in 1901-2 ; and the worked flints found during 
the excavation are exhibited in the lower part of Table- 
case G, adjoining. A classification of the diff'erent phases 
of the Neolithic period has been added to the Stone Age 
gallery, and bronze vessels believed to be water-clocks of 
the Early Iron Age grouped together in Wall-case 14. 

Late-Keltic and Gaulish Sections. — The lower portions of 
Table-cases and P have been refitted and utilised for the 
exhibition of the Roman and other glass in the Morel 
collection, acquired in 1901. 

Romano-British Section. — Progress has been made with 
the catalogue of Roman pottery found in Britain, which is 
to be published with that in the Department of Greek and 
Roman Antiquities ; and a second diagram of Gallo-Roman 
red-ware afiixed to the screen. The collection of red-ware 
fragments has been arranged in drawers with labels. In the 
Roman gallery on the ground floor several inscribed stones 
found in Britain have been permanently labelled. 

Anglo-Saxon Room. — The remaining table-cases have 
been furnished with sets of drawers, and the stored portion 
of the collection re-arranged. New labels have been provided 
for the series of weapons in table-case G. 

Mediceval Room. — The permanent labelling of the 
plaquette collection has been continued, and the series of chess- 
men, draughtsmen, etc., similarly treated. Various alterations 
have been made in the fittings of the wall-cases and frames of 
ornamental leather-work and needlework affixed to the wall. 

Glass and Ceramic Room. — The collection of Persian 
pottery has been re-arranged and labelled. 

Asiatic Saloon. — The Chinese porcelain with armorial 
and European subjects has been re-arranged, as well as the 
whole series of Japanese pottery and porcelain. The Stein 
collection from Chinese Turkestan, formerly exhibited on 
loan in Wall-cases 92-100, has been checked, distributed, 
and in part packed and despatched to India ; and progress 



74 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

has been made with the mounting of the portion of the 
collection presented to the Trustees, and with the Hoernle 
collection from the same region. 

Gallery of Religions. — Two large Hindu carvings and 
one Javanese sculpture have been mounted on plinths and 
placed in position. 

Ethnographical Gallery. — The Australian series has been 
labelled and re-arranged in six wall -cases and two table- 
cases. New Zealand feather cloaks have been examined 
and repacked. 

Micronesian ornaments have been exhibited in three 
frames and a table-case. The collection from the aborigines 
of the Malay States has been partly re-arranged and 
re-labelled : and the North-west Coast pipes and ornaments 
mounted and exhibited in drawers accessible to the public. 

Ainerican Room. — The West Indian collection has been 
checked and re-arranged, and the series of Mexican mosaics 
re-arranged in a new standard case. The Bolivar and Manson 
collections of Peruvian antiquities have been exhibited, the 
textiles being mounted in frames and placed in an upright 
case. 

Registration, etc. — The registration of current acquisitions 
has been continued, and 2,661 objects have been added, 
including ethnographical specimens. 

Photographs to the number of 186 have been taken in the 
Department for purposes of illustration and reference, and 
36 extra prints prepared. Typewritten labels to the number 
of 1,008 have been cut and bordered ; 87 mounting boards 
papered, and 815 objects mounted. There have been pre- 
pared 619 blocks, labels, frames, plinths, and miscellaneous 
littiugs, and labels have been printed in the Department. 

Registration numbers have been painted on 2,033 specimens 
and 891 permanent labels written. 

Catalogues. — The Guide to the Mediaeval Room has been 
passed through the press and was published in March. A 
catalogue of ivory carvings has been begun and photographic 
plates prepared for the same. The slip-catalogue of Chinese 
porcelain has been completed ; also a similar catalogue of 
Japanese pottery and porcelain. Progress has been made 
with the Guide to the Ethnographical Gallery, and the 
catalogue of Roman pottery has been revised in proof. 

Students. — Three thousand two hundred and fifty-four 
students and visitors have been received in the Department. 
The Battersea Field Club, Selborne Society, Ealing Micro- 
scopical Society, Barnsbury Park School, and Rev. J. Evans' 
party have been conducted through various sections of the 
Department by members of the staff. 



BRITTSH AND MEDIAEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 75 

II. — A cquisitions. 
(1.) PTehistoric and Early British Antiquities: — 

(a.) Stone Age. — A flint of eolithic type from Hatfield, 
Herts, and a glossy flint borer from Knowle Farm Quarry, 
Savernake, Wilts ; given by Rev. H. G. 0, Kendall. 

Wedge-like flint implement found 25-30 ft. deep in gravel 
above the London clay at Eccleston Street East, Pimlico, 
with the split bone of a bison (?) ; given by T. W. Moss, Esq. 

Three teeth of a shark (Carcharodon Rondeleti) with the 
basal portion pierced by a boring mollusc in a manner 
suggesting human work, from the Norwich crag (Backhouse 
collection) ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a, 

A remarkable polished celt of jade-like stone, of a type 
rarely found in Britain, from the Thames at Vauxhall 
Bridge ; and an unpolished implement from the Thames at 
Hammersmith. 

Polished flint celt from Takeley, Dunmow, Essex ; given 
by C. H. Read, Esq., F.S.A. 

A series of small worked flints found by the donor in the 
St. Clether district, Cornwall ; given by Henry Dewey, Esq. 

The flint knives, arrow-heads, and worked flints found 
during excavations by Mr. St. George Gray on behalf of 
a committee of the British Association, at the stone-circle 
of Arbor Low, Derbyshire, described and illustrated in 
ArchoBologia, LVIII. 461 ; given by the British Association. 

A series of small flint instruments and arrowheads found 
with pottery fragments in sand-hills near Stranraer, 
Wigtownshire ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., F.S.A. 

(b.) Bronze Age. — Bronze celt of early type with herring- 
bone markings on both faces, found at Copthorn (Shropshire ?) 

Bronze palstave without loop, found on the east side of 
the Minories, London, 18 ft. deep ; given by C. H. Read, 
Esq., F.S.A. 

A gold hoard of 10 oz. Troy, dating from the late Bronze 
Age and comprising 9 bracelets of various forms and weights, 
the latter being in the proportion of 8, 4, 2, 1, and indicating 
their use as currency ; found near the hoard reported last 
year, in a gravel pit at Bexley, Kent, and, like that hoard, 
purchased from H.M. Treasury as Treasure Trove. 

Implements of stone and flint, worked bones, pottery and 
bronze brooches of the second century, A.D., found during 
excavations in Ravencliflfe Cave, Bakewell, Derbyshire, 1906, 
and given by the Exploration Committee through W. Storrs 
Fox, Esq. 

(c.) Early Iron Age. — A cordoned bronze bucket of 
unusual interest, with a pair of arched movable handles 



76 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM 

and in perfect condition, found during excavations for the 
Brooklands motor-track, Weybridge, Surrey, and given by 
William Dale, Esq., f.s.a. This specimen is the first found 
in Britain, and dates from the Hallstatt period (earliest Iron 
Age of the Continent), being made for export in North Italy 
about the seventh century, B.C. It is figured and described 
in Proceedings of the Society of Antiquaries of London, 
vol. xxi., p. 464. 

Pottery and wood fragments dredged from the Thames at 
London. 

(d.) Foreign. — A series of flints from upper miocene 
beds in the Cantal (Pu}' Courny and Puy de Boudieu), and 
typical specimens from Belgium illustrating the Mesvin, 
Strepy, Flcnu, Campigny, and Robenhausen periods of the 
Stone Age, as classified by the donor, Dr. Alfred Rutot, 

Three chert palaeolithic implements found near Cara- 
manico, province of Chieti, Italy ; given b}^ D. I. Bushnell, 
Esq., Junior. 

Flint core, disc, and flakes from Dept. Vienne, and two 
implements from Montiers, Dept. Somme ; given by Dr. Paul 
Raymond. 

A series of neolithic flint hammerstone and pot-boilers 
from northern France, collected and given by M. A. Durdan. 

Stone maul or pick of the 12th dynasty, ofl'ering-tray 
of pottery (10th dynasty ?), and reed baskets (15th-18th 
dynasty), from Rifeh, Egypt ; given by the British School 
of Arch.seology in Egypt, through Prof. Flinders Petrie. 

A stone celt of wedge pattern and another with oval 
section and chisel edge from Mergui district, Lower Burma ; 
given by Maung Maung and R. Grant Brown, Esq., i.c.s. 

Terra-cotta ring-stand for pottery urns, of the Early Iron 
Age, found with others near Linares, prov. of Jaen, Spain, 
and described in Revue Arcfieologique, 190C), ipt. ii. ; given 
by Horace Sandars, Esq., F.S.A. 

(2.) Romano -British : — 

Cinerary urn and bowl of black ware found during 
excavations for the Birkbeck Bank, High Holborn, about 
1897 ; given by C. F. Ravenscroft, Esq. 

Circular mount for furniture, with bust in relief, dug 
up near Redland, Bristol ; and an enamelled hinged brooch 
of bronze, from Castle Hill, Huddersfield ; given oy C. H. 
Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Copper cake with defaced Roman stamps, found near 
Capel Curig, Carnedd Llewelyn, Snowdon, and two fragments 
of rough copper from the Thames, 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 7/ 

(3.) Anglo-Saxon and Foreign Teutonic : — 

Bronze trefoil-headed brooch from Naseby Field, 
Northants : an enamelled escutcheon from a hanging bowl ; 
a Frankish inlaid brooch of wheel-pattern, and girdle-plate 
inlaid with silver ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

A remarkable series of silver personal ornaments and 
ingots, including a massive engraved bracelet, another of 
tore pattern, finger-rings, and ear-rings of various patterns, 
found together with gold objects and enamelled medallions at 
Kieff, S. Russia, 1906, in a casket 7-8 ft. below the surface ; 
the hoard is shown by the presence of coins of Vladimir I. 
(988-1015) to belong to the 11th century ; given by J. Pierpont 
Morgan, Esq. 

(4.) Mediaeval and Later : — 

(a.) British. — Portion of a monumental brass with bare 
feet of standing figure, about 1500 ; and on reverse inscrip- 
tion about 1520, from the Plowright collection; given by Mill 
Stephenson, Esq., f.s.a. 

A hoard of seven silver spoons, some bearing dates from 
1586-1632, found together at Netherhampton, Wilts; pur- 
chased from H.M. Treasury as Treasure Trove. 

Iron key with drop wards found on the site of Newgate 
prison ; given by Siegfried Bendit, Esq. 

Winchester quart and half-pint measures from Barford 
Stodden and Willey Hundreds, Beds, 1822 ; and another 
bearing the arms of Westminster and date 1763 ; given by 
C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Brass tobacco-box wdth view of Rotterdam, engraved in 
front " James Wood, 1759 " ; given by C. R. Jennings, Esq. 

Nine glass cameo portraits by Tassie, including one of the 
Earl of Rochford, 1774; and a wax portrait of Rev. Robert 
Hall, of Leicester, by T. R. Poole, 1815 ; given by Max 
Rosenheim, Esq., F.S.A., through the National Art Collections 
Fund. 

Pillow and stand for lace -making from Bucks, an obsolete 
implement for thatching, and a hand-plough ; given by 
J. Edge-Partington, Esq. 

(b.) Foreign. — A remarkable specimen of Carlovingian 
carving, consisting of a panel of whale-bone 11^ in. long, 
representing David dictating the Psalms, the king enthroned 
between soldiers on the right, and on the left four scribes 
writing with a cofi'er between them. It has been subsequently 
used as a cover of a casket, the edges being pierced for 
hinges and lock ; and was found about 1845 in Thos. Crum- 
well's house at Hoxton, London. It dates from the 9th 
century, and is on a larger scale than the panel with similar 



78 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

subject at the Louvre. Given by the National Art Collec- 
tions Fund, and illustrated in the Reliquary and Illustrated 
Archaeologist, vol. xi. (J 905), frontispiece. 

Jasper equal-armed cross with gold medallions on either 
side at the centre, with cloisonne enamels of Our Lord and 
St. George, and a similar medallion of St. Gregory in crescent 
gold mount, found at Stamboul : Byzantine, 11th century. 

Bone panel carved in Byzantine style, with a vine-scroll 
enclosing baskets and grapes, given with other objects from 
Oxyrrhynchus by the Egypt Exploration Fund. 

Piece of silk brocade, Saracenic, about 1200 ; bronze 2 oz. 
weights of Beziers (Herault), and of Nismes (Gard), and 4 oz. 
weight of Beziers, 13th century, and bronze mount of a 
martingale (?) once enamelled ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., 

F.S.A. 

Copper-gilt reliquary with openwork faces, birds in 
medallions, and numerous glass settings, of the 12th century; 
Limoges enamelled bookcover with Our Lord and the 
Evangelistic symbols, and panel from a reliquary representing 
the martyrdom of St, Thomas of Canterbury, early 13th 
century ; a square panel enamelled with the figure of a saint 
on blue ground ; a brass Icon with Russian enamel, silver-gilt 
badge once set with stones, and agate pommel of a sword, 
Italian, 14th century ; all from the collection of the late 
Albert Way, r.s.A. 

Wooden bust of a young lady, Italian, 16th century; 
given by Alfred A. de Pass, Esq. 

Bronze pommel oC a dagger, enamelled on both sides with 
coats of arms, (1) a lion rampant, (2) a fesse between bezants, 
azure, 15th century ; obtained in Palestine and given by 
Henry Wallis, Esq. 

Tortoise-shell medallion pressed with intaglio of Louis 
XVI. ; given by A. W^ F. Fuller, Esq. 

(5.) Ceramic and Glass Collections : — 

(a.) Oriental Wares. — Long-necked bottle enamelled in 
blue and lustred, of the 13th century, found near Aleppo, 
Syria. 

Bowl with creamy glaze and marbling in colours, found 
imbedded in a wall at Jerusalem ; and modern copy of a 
Turkish faience dish; given by C. H. Read, Esq., F.s.A. 

Three unusually fine glazed bowls and a jug with black 
and coloured designs, said to be fronj excavations at Sulta- 
nabad, Irak, Persia, and dating from the 12th or 13th 
century. 

Four star-shaped tiles with floral designs, and one square 
blue tile with Arabic characters in relief : Persian, of the 
13th and 14th centuries ; obtained at Teheran, and given by 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 79 

Sir Thos. D. Gibson Carmichael, Bt., through the National 
Art Collections Fund. 

A number of glazed bowls, fragments, and wasters of 
Persian ware, said to have been found in excavations at 
Rakka, Aleppo. 

Series of glazed tiles made up like mosaic, of various 
colours, from the Musalla at Herat, a place of prayer pulled 
down by order of the Amir in 1885 ; given by Hon. Col. C. E. 
Yate, C.S.I., c.m.g. 

Bowl of Persian narghili with turquoise glaze and open- 
work metal covering ; given by Sydney Vacher, Esq. 

Celadon ware bowls, vases, and figures of animals, collected 
by Mr. Graham on the site of the old kilns at Sawankalok, 
central Siam. 

Part of a large Burmese glazed tile, with horse-headed 
human figure in relief, probably loth century ; given by 
A. A. de Pass, Esq. 

Ridge-tiles and antefixes with blue and yellow glazes, 
from a temple in Pekin and the great Lama temple, Huang 
Ssii ; given by C. H. Read, Esq., r.s.A. 

Glazed cylindrical vase in the form of an open book, with 
landscape scene and inscription, Japanese ; given by Sir H. H. 
Howorth, K.C.I.E. 

(b.) Continental. — Five reproductions of glazed mediaeval 
dishes in Italy, one with a fish being at S. Apollinare in 
Classe, Ravenna ; and the rest built into a campanile wall 
in Italy ; given by Henry Wallis, Esq. 

(c.) English. — Tall jug of brown ware found in London ; 
given by H. Curwen, Esq. 

Glazed jug with incised chevrons and inscription. " Mary 
Tucker, London, 1629." 

Cider-mug of buff vrare with brown markings, of the 17th 
century, said to have been found in Bishopsgate ; given by 
Robert Steele, Esq. 

Tankard with brown glaze and inscription " Hark, hark, 
Woodman," and date 1854, made at Howcans, near Halifax ; 
given by H. Ling Roth, Esq. 

Delft mug, pots, and fragments with cockspur, found in 
Tooley Street, Southwark, 17th century ; given by G. F. 
Lawrence, Esq. 

Fragments and wasters found on the site of potteries at 
Cricl), Derbyshire ; given by M. Salt, Esq. 

Jasper-ware vase-label with blue dotted border, inscribed 
"By J. Wedgwood, F.R.S.,"and used in his showroom ; given 
by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Jasper-ware figure of Hebe, marked " Wedgwood " ; given 
by G. H. Vyze, Esq. 



80 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Three pottery stamps with letters, and a crucible stamped 
" Battersea Works " ; given by A. W. F. Fuller, Esq. 

Porcelain plate in blue, red, and gold, marked " Spode " ; 
given by St. George Littledale, Esq. 

Vase with lustre decoration in imitation of a Persian 
model, made b}'- Pilkingtons, 1907 ; given by William Burton, 
Esq. 

Two terra-cotta water-bottles made by Crossley of Com- 
mondale ; given by Arthur Hurst, Esq. 

Seven small plain pavement-tiles with brown glaze, from 
a late 14th century chapel, St, Augustine's, Canterbury ; 
given by W. H. St. John Hope, Esq. 

Tile with fleur-de-lys design, dated about 1700, found on 
the site of an old pottery at Muddlebridge, Fremington, near 
Barnstaple, Devon ; given by R. Manderson, Esq. 

(d.) Glass. — Two phials and fragments of twisted bracelets 
from Oxyrrhynchus ; given by the Egypt Exploration Fund. 

Jug blown in a mould, with van dyke patterns, found at 
Nippur, Babylonia. 

Two vases of Bristol ware, with slight vertical ribs, late 
18th century ; given by T. Charbonnier, Esq. 

Standing cup of deep blue colour, with cover and cypher 
of Sophia Charlotte, Queen of Prussia (1668-1705). 

(6.) Collection illustrating various Religions : — 

(a.) Buddhism. — Seven brass Chinese Lamaistic figures 
from Pekin. 

Japanese Buddhist figure in gilt wood, with elaborate 
pedestal, from Japan. 

Head of stone figure of Buddha fasting of the Grpeco- 
Bactrian period ; given by Col. F. G. Mainwaring. 

(7.) Oriental and Ethnographical : — 

Asia.- — Part of the valuable series of antiquities discovered 
by Dr. M. A. Stein in Chinese Turkestan during 1900-1, 
the remainder being assigned to the Calcutta and Lahore 
museums. It comprises 250 objects of terracotta, stone, 
bronze, wood, glass, and textile, mostly illustrated in Ancient 
Khotan, by M. A. Stein, and the principal sites represented 
are Yangi-Arik, Togujai, Yotkan, Dandan-Uiliq, Niya, 
Endere, and Rawak-Vihara. The series dates from about the 
3rd to 8th century of our era, and includes statuettes, panel 
and fresco paintings, furniture, seals, and Buddhist stucco 
reliefs ; given by the Secretary of State for India in Council. 

Iron spearhead, with socket inlaid with silver, probably 
from Hither Asia, but obtained in Somerset ; given by Wallis 
Cash, Esq. 



BKITISH AND MEDIAEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 81 

A quiver and arrows from the North West Provinces of 
India ; given by Lady Gatacre. 

A bronze weight in the form of a duck, from Burma ; 
given by J. L. Holmes, Esq. 

Apparatus for applying lac to the teeth, folding candle- 
sticks, a sake-heater, and three weapons from Japan, and 
three silver amulet cases from Ceylon ; given by C. Lund, Esq. 

Copper-gilt pilaf dish, Turkish, I7th century ; given by 
H. W. Murray, Esq. 

Two bronze armlets of a type represented in the Treasure 
of the Oxus, and probably from that district; given by 
C. H. Read, Esq., F.S.A. 

A set of cubical boxes fitting into one another and 
engraved as seals, Chinese ; given by Max Rosenheim, Esq., 

F.S.A. 

A silk scarf and two sarong with unusuall}^ elaborate 
dyed ornament from Sumatra, and a silver filigree pipe 
inscribed "The work of Muhammad Muhun Sahib (?), 
Aslaml N'u'm,dngirl of Siripul" ; given by Mrs. Eustace 
Smith. 

Four Assamese spears ; given by Mrs. Stillwell. 

A loom from the island of Sermatta. 

Africa. — A large and very important series of ornaments, 
weapons, utensils, musical instruments, etc., from the little- 
known tribes of the Kwilu watershed, Congo Free State; 
collected by Emil Torday, Esq. {See '^ Journal of the 
Anthropological Institute," Vol. XXXV. 398, XXXVL, 39 and 
272, and XXXVII., 133). 

A large collection of ornaments, weapons, etc., chiefly from 
the Nandi of the East Africa Protectorate ; collected and 
given by A. C. Hollis, Esq., Secretary to the Protectorate. 

A series of objects from the tribes of the province of 
Bauchi, Southern Nigeria ; given by Sir H. H. Howorth, 

K.C.I.E. 

A series of paper squeezes of Bushman rock carvings ; 
given by Rev. G. C. Robinson. 

Pottery and. jewellery from the Kabyles of Algeria ; objects 
from the Tuareg ; textiles and a copper dish from Algeria, 
the latter inscribed " The oiuner is the Haji Ahmad 
Budurbah ; year 1124" (a.d. 1712) ; give by Mrs. Eustace 
Smith. 

Five steatite figures from Sierra Leone. 

An axe from S.E. Africa, three wooden combs from 
Kwango, and two shields from the Semliki Valley. 

Oceania. — A jade club (vierd) of unusual perfection of 
workmanship. This specimen is distinguished by the fact 
that the handle is carved to represent a bird's head, a 

0.109. F 



82 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

peculiarity not hitherto observed in clubs of this material. 
Given by C. H. Eead, Esq., f.s.a. 

A series of six so-called " Gravestones " from New South 
Wales, Australia. Given by Graham Officer, Esq. 

A model canoe from Nine (Savage Island). 

AracTica. — An obsidian mask and mirro]-, and a jadeite 
dagger. All three objects are of unusually fine work, and are 
of great interest and value in the Collection ; they were 
collected by the late Right Hon. Sir E. Thornton, G.C.B., 
while serving as an attache in Mexico ; given by the 
Misses Thornton. 

A large and very important collection of Peruvian 
antiquities, including gold and silver vessels and ornaments, 
feather- and mosaic-work, copper utensils and ornaments, 
implements and materials used in the manufacture of textile 
fabrics, and a large series of textiles and pottery vases ; 
collected in the provinces of Pacasmayo, La Libertad, and 
Ancachs, by Dr.. de Bolivar. 

An interesting series of ancient Peruvian textiles ; given 
by Sir Patrick Manson, k.c.m.g., f.r.s. 

A collection of shell implements and pendants from the 
" Ten Thousand Islands " off the coast of Florida ; collected 
and given by Clarence B. Moore, Esq. 

Five stone arrowheads from Ontario ; given by Arthur 
Reynolds, Esq. 

Four ancient Peruvian vases ; given by J. J. Stevenson, 
Esq. 

An interesting gold ornament from Colombia, representing 
eight men playing various musical instruments. 

A shale bowl and a wooden comb inlaid with haliotis 
shell, both unusually fine specimens, from Queen Charlotte 
Island. 

A doll and a pair of sandals from an ancient grave in 
Peru. 



Christy Collection. 

During the year 78 objects have been entered in the 
Registration Catalogue. The Christy Trustees have acquired 
by donation and exchange the following objects, which they 
have transferred to the Trustees of the British Museum : — 

I. — Prehistoric Antiquities of Europe, Asia, and 
Africa : — 

Exchange. — Three pal?eoliths from the Kempston beds, 
Bedford. 



BRITISH AND MEDIEVAL ANTIQUITIES. 83 

II. — Ethnograjphy of Asia : — 

Donations. — A " sacred " kris from Java ; given by 

D. Croll, Esq. 

Three clay tablets with Buddhist formulse from a cave 
near Mat Harn in the Province of Trang, Siamese Malay 
States ; given by W. A. Graham, Esq. 

Two wooden buckets from Siam ; given by T. A. Joyce, 
Esq. 

Prepared skull from the collection of a Dyak head-hunter, 
Borneo ; given by M. Little, Esq. 

Persian knife and sheath ; given by B. D. Passa, Esq. 

Chinese glaive, taken at the battle of Pekin ; given by 
C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

Pair of spectacles formerly worn by the Abbot of 
N'Gantse monastery. Tibet ; given by Max Rosenheim, 
Esq., F.S.A. 

A shield and a tobacco-pipe from Sarawak ; given by 
R. H. Shelford, Esq. 

A model canoe from Ceylon ; given by N.W. Thomas, Esq. 

III. — Ethnogra2^hy of Africa: — 
Donations. — Specimens of Ajawa, carving from British 
Central Africa; given by R. H. B. Blair, Esq. 

A steatite carving from Mendiland, Sierra Leone ; given 
by A. W. Boddy, Esq. 

A marimba and a number of fetish objects from the Gold 
Coast ; given by Miss Hart Davis. 

Musical instruments, etc., from the Western Sudan, a 
loom and a pottery vase from Nigeria; given by A. W. F. 
Fuller, Esq. 

An earthenware vessel from K'pando, Togoland ; given by 

E. T. Gikunoo, Esq. 

A gourd pipe, a horn, and a belt from Uganda ; given by 
G. C. Ishmael, Esq. 

The outfit of a Munyoro wizard, f I'om Uganda ; given by 
G. P. V. Jervoise, Esq. 

The bed of a Nigerian chief ; given by J. C. Sciortino, Esq. 

A basket from East Africa ; given by R. Phene Spiers, 
Esq., f.r.i.b.a. 

An ethnographical series from the Benue River, Nigeria ; 
given by D. W. Webster, Esq. 

IV. — Ethnography of Oceania and Australia : 
Donations.— A shell adze from Bellona, Solomon Islands : 
given by the Rev. Dr. R. H. Codrington. 

F i 



84 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Six javelins from the Alligator River, Australia ; given by 
Norman H. Hardy, Esq. 

Tridacna-shell slab, with openwork carving, from the 
Solomon Islands ; given by W. H. Hazelton, Esq. 

Three glass spearheads from Broome, Western Australia ; 
given by F. G. Montague Powell, Esq. 

A series of stone implements from Victoria, Australia ; 
given by C. H. Read, Esq., f.s.a. 

A fragment of prehistoric pottery from British New 
Guinea ; given by Dr. C. G. Seligmann. 

A prepared skull from the New Hebrides ; given by 
Dr. F. C. Shrubsall. 

A series of objects from British New Guinea ; given by 
Dr. W. M. Strong. 

A fire- stick from the D'Entrecasteaux group; given by 
A. A. Wickham, Esq. 

V. — Antiquities and Ethnography of America : — 
Donations. — Pottery vases from Teotihuacan^ Mexico ; 
given by W. A. Caldecott, Esq. 

Two photographs of ancient ruins at Xochicalco ; given 
by J. Cooper Clark, Esq. 

Specimens of modern Mexican pottery ; given by C. E. 
Cooper, Esq. 

Glass-headed arrow from Tierra del Fuego ; given by 
Captain Crawshay. 

Throwing-club from the Hopi of Arizona ; given by 
W. Crewdson, Esq., f.s.a. 

Pottery vase and shell figurines from Darien ; given by 
W. Farquhar, Esq. 

Two obsidian spearheads from Honduras ; given by 
Dr. T. Gann. 

Two pottery figures from La Tolita, Ecuador ; given by 
J. N. Hendry, Esq. 

A string-net dress from the Chaco, Paraguay ; given by 
Sir H, H. Howorth. k.c.i.e. 

A series of weapons from the Cachibo Indians of Peru ; 
given by N. Iconicofi", Esq. 

Fur head-dress believed to have belonged to the Indian 
Chief "Sitting Bull"; given by J. T. Woolrych-Perowne. 
Esq. 

Neck ornament of jaguar-claws, Bororo Indians, South 
America ; given by Paul Radin, Esq. 

Charles B. Read. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 85 



Department of Coins and Medals. 

I. — Exhibitions. 

The medals exhibited in the corridor have been carefully 
cleaned. 

II. — Registration and Arrangement. 

1. Greek Series : — 

288 coins from the Parkes Weber collection and 381 
recently acquired have been registered and incorporated. 

3,256 tickets giving references to the published Catalogues 
Parthia, Phrygia, and Cyprus have been written and placed 
in the trays beneath the coins. 

12 " Uncertain " coins have been identified. 

Rectifications have been made in the Sicilian series, and 
the series of Etruria and Olbia have been re-arranged and 
expanded. 

The Leopold Hamburger collection of Phoenician and 
Palestinian coins (about 2,700 specimens) has been examined 
in detail. A series of Lycian coins, another of Seleucid 
coins, and five collections chiefly of Palestinian coins have 
been examined, and selections have been made where 
desirable. 

2. Roman and Byzantine Series : — 

204 coins from the Parkes Weber collection and 179 
recently acquired have been registered and incorporated. 

The whole series of Roman medallions has been weighed 
and the weight noted on a ticket beneath each specimen. 

The collection of Becker's forgeries and other spurious 
Roman coins, including the Italian imitations of the sixteenth 
century, has been entirely re-arranged in two cabinets, with 
cards and labels. 

A hoard of Roman silver coins found at Icklingham in 
Suff'olk has been examined and a selection made for the 
Museum. The Weybridge hoard of bronze coins (Diocletian, 
etc.) has also been examined. Numerous coins from the 
recent excavations at Corbridge have been examined and 
identified. 

3. British and Colonial Series : — 

436 coins and medals from the Parkes Weber collection, 
and 63 from recent acquisitions have been registered and 
incorporated. 

258 eighteenth-century tokens of Scotland from the 
Freudenthal collection have been incorporated, and the 
general collection of Scottish tokens has been re-arranged. 



86 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Corrections have been made in the series of the coins of 
William I. and II., and the Anglo-Gallic coinage of 
Edward III. 

The series of casts and electrotypes and the collection of 
modern forgeries have been expanded. 

New heading-cards have been inserted where necessary 
in the Anglo-Saxon series (cabinets 1 and 2). 

A small hoard of silver coins (Treasure Trove) of Edward 
Vl.-Charles I. found at Cwmnant Tredsdridge, Pendoylan, 
Wales, has been examined. 

4. Mediceval and Modern Series : — 

.3,705 coins, medals, and tickets from the Parkes Weber 
collection have been registered and incorporated. 876 coins 
and medals from recent acquisitions have also been registered 
and incorporated. 386 miscellaneous coins, medals, and tokens 
from the Freudenthal collection have been incorporated, and 
977 Spanish coins, being recent acquisitions or specimens 
from the Parkes Weber and Freudenthal collections, have 
been incorporated. 

1,422 coins, medals, and jetons of Belgium and Holland 
from the Freudenthal collection have been incorporated 
in the general collection, which has been expanded and 
re-arranged with fresh heading-cards. 

The whole series of French coins has been re-arranged 
and re-labelled, and 736 specimens incorporated from the 
Freudenthal collection, necessitating the expansion of the 
series from three to five cabinets. 

A series of coins of Saxony and Bavaria offered for 
presentation has been examined, and a selection made. 

Progress has been made with the MS. Index to the 
Traite de Numismatiqiie of Engel and Serrure. 

Rectifications have been made in the series of Dutch and 
Italian medals of the Renaissance, and the re-arrangement of 
the Dutch artistic medals (under Artists' names) has been 
completed. 

The cleaning of the general collection of Italian medals 
has been begun. 

The series of medals, of various countries, l:oo large to be 
inserted in the ordinary cabinets, has been arranged with new 
labels in the lower part of the King's Cabinet, which has 
been fitted for the purpose. 

5. Oriental Series : — 

363 coins from the Parkes Weber collection, and 919 coins 
recently acquired, have been registered and incorporated. 
1,388 coins of China and Japan acquired in past years have 
been registered. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 87 

The Persian series has been expanded, and 557 tickets 
refei-ring to the Catalogue Persia have been written and 
inserted in the trays. 

A series of Oriental coins offered for presentation by 
Mr. Evelyn Grant DufF has been examined, and a selection 
made. 

807 coins of Annam and the coins of Siam and Cambodia 
have been arranged. 2,216 coins of Korea, from the Tamba, 
Morse, and other collections, have been classified according to 
mints and issues, and fresh heading-cards have been written 
where necessary. 

197 ingots, bars, &c. of Siam, Burma, and the Shan States, 
acquired in past years, have been classified and incorporated. 
32 coins of Tibet have been identified and classified. 

About 4,600 coins of the Chinese Empire from the Gardner, 
Morse, Freudenthal, and other collections have been amal- 
gamated with the general collection and arranged, with 
heading-cards, under Emperors, mints, and denominations. 
A separate series has been formed of the Chinese medals and 
amulets known as " Temple Money." 



III. — Catalogues. 

1. Catalogues of Greek Coins. 

Coins of Phoenicia, by G. F. Hill. 

The coins of Byblus, Csesarea ad Libanum, Dora, Orthosia, 
and Sidon have been weighed, arranged, and described. 
Progress has been made with the historical introduction. 

2. Catalogues of Roman Coins. 
Roman Republican Coins, by H. A. Grueber. 

The printing of the text of volume I. (594 pages) has been 
completed, and the text of volume II. has proceeded as far 
as sig. R, sent to press, and sig. DD, sent for revise. The 
preparation of the plaster-casts for the illustrations has been 
continued, and plates have been photographed and sent to 
press up to PI. 86. 

Imperial Byzantine Coins, by Warwick Wroth. 

During the course of the year the whole of the text of the 
two volumes of the work (643 pages in all) has been set up in 
type. Volume I. (text) has been worked off", and volume II. 
(text) as far as page 536. The preparation of casts for the 
illustrations has been continued, and 66 plates have been 
photographed and passed for final press. The historical 
Introduction has been written and placed in the printer's 
hands, and the Index has been begun. 



88 



ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



3. Catalogues of British Coins and Medals. 
J/edallic Illustrations of the History of Greed Britain 

and Ireland, by Hawkins, Franks, and Gnieber. 

(Atlas of plates, with letterpress). 

The plates and letterpress of Part VI. have been completed, 

and the Part has been published. Part VII. has also been 

prepared and published. The selection of the medals for 

Part VIII. has been begun. 

4. Catalogues of Oriental Coins. 

Indian Coins. — Andhras and Western Kshatrapas, by 
E. J. Rapson. 

Signatures H to E E have been sent to press. 18 Plates 
have been mounted and photographed. 



IV. — A cquisitions. 

The total number of coins and medals added to the 
Department during the year 1907 was 1,122, of which 39 are 
of gold, 597 of silver, 454 of bronze, and 32 of other metals. 

The following table shows the numbers of the new acqui- 
sitions classified according to the several series to which they 
belong : — 











Other 




Class. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Bronze. 


Metals, 
&c. 


Total. 


Greek . . . . 


5 


178 


265 


_ 


448 


Roman 


11 


65 


101 


— 


177 


British and Colonial 


2 


25 


IJ 


4 


45 


Mediaeval and Modern 


2 


239 


26 


28 


295 


Oriental - - - - 


19 


90 


48 


— 


157 


Total - 


39 


597 


451 


32 


1,122 



Of the above, 491 have been presented, viz., 15 of gold, 
298 of silver, 149 of bronze, and 29 of other metals. 

The following is a list of benefactors to the Department 
of Coins during the past year : — 

The Government of Bombay ; the Government of the 
Central Provinces, India ; the Government Museum, Madras ; 
the British School of Archaeology in Egypt ; the Comite 
Executif de 1' Exposition de Liege, 1905 ; the Excavation Com- 
mittee of the Institute of Archaeology, University of Liver- 
pool ; Howard Pay son Arnold, Esq. ; the Right Hon. Viscount 
Barrington ; J. G. Burlison, Esq. : E. Butcher, Esq. ; E. G. 
Coutts, Esq. ; A. W. Dauglish, Esq. ; Evelyn Grant Duff, 
Esq. ; Sir John Evans, k.c.b. ; A. Felsenthal, Esq. ; H. A. 
Grueber, Esq., F.S.A. ; F. W. Hasluck, Esq. ; C. W. Harrison, 
Esq.; G. F. Hill, Esq.; Sir Henry H. Howorth, k.c.i.e. ; 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 89 

AVilliam J. Hughan, Esq. ; Framji Jamasji Thanawala, Esq. ; 
R. A, Inglis, Esq. ; Lewis L. Kropf, Esq. ; H. F. Locke- 
King, Esq. ; Warren Lugden, Esq. ; J. R. McClean, Esq. ; J. 
S. McLennan, Esq. ; Miss Constance F. M. Masse ; the Deputy 
Master of the Mint ; E. W. Newton, Esq. ; Alfred de Pass, 
Esq. ; R. T. Pritchett, Esq. (bequest) ; H. L. Rabino, Esq. ; 
Augustus Ready, Esq. ; J. T. T. Reed, Esq. ; Max Rosenheim, 
Esq., F.s.A. ; Samuel Smith, Esq. (bequest) ; Messrs. Spink 
and Son ; the Rev. L. Harding Squire ; H. W. Thomson, 
Esq. ; S. Tulloch, Esq. ; A. J. B. Wace, Esq. ; Sir Hermann 
Weber, m.d. ; Captain C. P. Wilson ; A. M. Woodward, Esq. ; 
Edward Wooler, Esq. ; Arthur S. Yeames, Esq. 

Remarkable Coins and Medals. 

1. Greek Series : — 

Among the 448 Greek coins added to the National Col- 
lection during the year 1907, the following are the most 
important : — 

(a) Europe : — 
Italy. — Etruria. Numerous specimens of the aes grave 
attributed to Clusium, Volsinii, and various other mints, 
including the series with ohv. Krater, rev. Wheel ; ohv. Foot- 
less amphora, rev. Wheel ; ohv. Head of double-axe, rev. 
Wheel (with small denominations struck) ; ohv. Wheel, rev. 
Wheel, countermarked with ivy-leaf, etc. Silver coins of 
various mints, including four with ohv. Gorgoneion, rev. Star 
and crescent (Populonia) ; one with ohv. Sepia, rev. Plain 
(Populonia) ; and one with ohv. Male head and mark of value 
X, rev. Plain (63 '6 grains, mint uncertain). Also a large 
series of struck bronze of Populonia and Vetulonia. All the 
above Etruscan coins were acquired at the sale of the Strozzi 
collection. 

A rare aichaic didrachm of Cumae: ohv. Head of nymph: 
rev. Mussel-shell, with crest of helmet as symbol. From the 
Strozzi sale. 

Two rare Apulian bronze coins, of Teate {ohv. Head of 
Apollo, rev. Man-headed bull) and Venusia (nummus with 
ohv. Head of Maenad, rev. Maenad seated). From the Strozzi 
sale. 

A silver didrachm of Thuriiim in Lucania, of the usual 
types, with Skylla on Athena's helmet ; symhol, ivy-leaf. 
From the Strozzi sale. 

Important specimens of the coinage of Caulonia (early 
incuse stater), Croton (a rare archaic didrachm, ohv. Eagle 
flying, rev. Tripod) and Terina (stater with the mark fl on 
both sides). From the Strozzi sale. 

Sicily. — A very rare, if not unique, gold coin of Agrigen- 
tum : ohv. Crab ; below, dolphin ; rev. Eagle on snake. A 
variety of the coin issued towards the end of the 5th century 



90 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

with the name of Silanos. Wt. 20*5 grs. From the Stvozzi 
salec 

Sarviatia.—A specimen of the exceedingly rare gold 
half-drachm of Olhia : ohv. Head of Demeter ; rev. OA 
Dolphin. Wt. 32*5 grs., cp. Yiok, Ant. MunzenNordgrieclien- 
lands I., PL ix. 18. Also eight dolphin-shaped coins of the 
same mint, and a large number of varieties of the bronze 
coinage, autonomous and imperial, of Olhia, Chersonesus, 
Fanticapaeum, Tyra, and Gercine. 

Thrace. — 16 tetradrachms and 1 drachm of King Lysima- 
chus. A very fine tetradrachm of Aenus, of severe style, 
of the end of the 5th century : ohv. Head of Hermes ; 
inscribed on his petasos, AINI ; rev. ANTIAAAZ Goat, 
and horned and goat-footed satyr as symbol. Weight 
256*3 grs. A similar specimen of this rare coin is in the 
Berlin collection. 

Macedon. — 79 tetradrachms, drachms, and half-drachms 
of Philip II., Alexander the Great, and later kings of 
Macedon. 

Thessaly. — A. silver drachm (weight 90*8 grs.) of Larisa, 
of the early 5th century: ohv. Head of the nymph Larisa, 
facing, of somewhat unusual style; rev. AAPIZAI Horse 
grazing to I. (instead of to r., as is usual on these coins). 

A,carnania. — A silver stater of Leucas, of the early 5th 
century : ohv. Pegasos ; rev. Head of Athena, the hair falling 
on the neck and tied in a bow at the end. Weight 132 grs. 
Also two later staters of the same mint, presented hy Sir 
H. H. Howorth, k.c.i.e. A silver coin (13 grs.) of Stratos, 
of the 5th century : ohv. Horned head of the river-god 
Acheloos 1. ; rev. Head of nymph Kallirrhoe r. 

Boeotia. — A silver didrachm (184*2 grs.) of Orchomenus, 
of the period 387-374 B.C. : ohv. Boeotian shield ; rev. EPXO 
Free horse cantering ; magistrate's name OflA; symbol, ear 
of corn. Four staters of Thehes, of the period 378-335 B.C., 
with the magistrates' names Amphi . . ., Anti . . ., Diok . . . 
and Lyki . . ., presented hy Sir H. H. Howorth, k.c.i.e. 

Peloponnesus. — A well preserved bronze coin of Corinth. 
ohv. Head of Lucius Verus; rev. C LI COR Chimaera spring- 
ing r. Apparently unpublished. 

(6) Asia : — 

Bithynia. — A large bronze coin of Cius : ohv. Head of 
Hadrian as Zeus Eleutherios ; re-y. AAPIANH KIOC City- 
goddess with sceptre and turreted crown, sacrificing at altar. 
A bronze coin of the same mint, of Philip Junior : rev. 
Sarapis with sceptre and wreath in raised r. hand. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 91 

Mysia. — A sixth of Cyzicus, of very pale electrum, c, 450 
B.C.; weight 33*3 grs. : obv. Bearded centaur kneeling on 
tunny -fish, wielding a tree trunk; rev. Mill-sail incusesquare. 
Cp. Greenwell, Cyzicus, No. 46. 

Ionia. — 40 bronze coins of Magnesia, of the 4th-3rd 
centuries B.C. from a hoard : obv. Horseman ; rev. Bull 
and magistrate's name. This set supplies many names of 
magistrates. 

Garia. — A rare bronze coin of Hydisus, of Gordian III., 
with the names of the magistrates (stephanephori) M. 
Aurelius Hermonax and Metrophanes. 

Lycia. — 12 silver coins of the Dynasts of the 5th and 4th 
centuries, including rare types of Kuprllis, Khdriga, and 
S'jjpntaza. Two bronze coins of the types of Alexander the 
Great and of the Macedonian interregnum, with the triskeles 
symbol, showing them to have been struck in Lycia. A 
bronze coin of Telmessus, of the early 3d century B.C. : obv. 
Head of Alexander the Great with ram's horn ; rev. Panther. 
TEAEMHZZEnN and PIT in monogram (for Ptolemy 
Soter ?). 

Pisidia. — A fine specimen of a rare bronze coin of the 
colony Comama, of the Emperor Geta ; rev., Goddess, veiled, 
standing facing. Presented by Sir Hermann Weber, m.d. 

Syria. — A silver tetradrachm of Antiochus I., with the 
types of Alexandei: the Great, and mint-marks Zl and K 
(reversed). The former may represent Sidon, but there is 
no other evidence that Sidon belonged to Antiochus I. at 
the time (soon after 281 B.C.) when this coin was struck. 

2. Roman and Byzantine Series : — 

(a.) Kepublic : 

A rare denarius struck at the local mint of Hatria : obv. 
Head of Roma ; rev. Dioscuri and mint-mark H- 

Two bronze trientes of Hatria and Canusium with mint- 
marks H and C respectively. From the Imhoof - Blumer 
collection. 

An aureus of M. Antonius (rev. P. CLODIVS M.F. 
HIIVIR A.P.F. Oriens) ; three denarii of L. Pinarius Scarpus, 
L. Mescinius Rufus, M. Durmius, and a quinarius of C. 
Aurelius. All from the Imhoof-Blumer collection. 

(6.) Empire : 
Nine aurei from the Strozzi collection, viz., four of 
Augustus; reverses (1) S.P.Q.R. CL. V. Victory flying with 
wreath, and shield on column ; (2) S.P.Q.R. Triumphal car in 
temple; (3) IMPX Bull butting r; (4) IMPX Augustus on 
platform receiving laurels from two soldiers ; one of Domitian ; 
rev. TR. POT. II. COS. Villi. DES. X. P.P. Minerva 
fighting ; one of Nerva ; rev. LIBERTAS PVBLICA; 
two of Hadrian ; reverses (1) ADVENTVS AVG. Roma 



92 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

receiving Hadrian (2) COS. III. The Emperor standing; 
one of Antoninus Pius; rev. SALVS AVG. Salus sacrificing. 
Six fine " cistophoric medallions " of Hadrian, from the 
Imhoof-Blumer collection. 

A bronze coin of Maximian and four of Allectus, all struck 
at London, from a find at Shrivenham, Berks. 

Presented hy the Rt. Hon. Viscount Barrington. 

73 bronze coins of the tetrarchy (Diocletian and Maximian 
Augusti, Constantius, and Galerius Csesares) struck between 
296 and .305 A. D., from the Brooklands (Wey bridge) Hoard. 
Of these GO were presented hy H. E. Locke-King, Esq. 

36 silver siliquse of the latter half of the fourth century 
(Julian, Jovian, Valentinian I., Valens, Gratian, Valentinian 
II., Theodosius, Magnus Maximus, Eugenius, Arcadius), being- 
part of the Treasure Trove of Grovely Wood, Wilts. 

11 silver siliquae of the same period (Valentinian I., Valens, 
Valentinian IL, Theodosius, Arcadius, Honorius) from a hoard 
found many years ago at Icklingham. 

3. British and Colonial Series : — 

(a) Coins : — 

A silver halfpenny of Eadmund of Wessex (A.D. 940- 
946) with the moneyer's name BALDVIN. The halfpenn}^ 
of this reign was previously unknown. 

Presented hy H. A. Grueher, Esq. 

A silver penny of Henry I. struck in London with the 
reverse type, a cross pattee and the legend ALFPINE ON 
LVNDE in two concentric circles. 

5 cut halfpennies and 2 cut farthings of Henry III. 
recently found at Canterbury. These pieces consist of 
pennies cut into halves or quarters to pass in circulation at 
these values. Presented hy E. Butcher, Esq. 

A bronze seventeenth-century token of Yarm in York- 
shire. Presented, hy E. Wooler, Esq. 

3 penny tokens of Cornwall and Devon ; date Ibll. 

Presented hy E. W. Neiuton, Esq. 

(b) Medals :— 

A bronze medallion with representation of the " Royal 
Sovereign," the finest ship in the navy of Charles I. This 
ship was built in 1637, and in the following year formed the 
subject of the reverse of the medal by Nicolas Briot. This 
medallion is also by Briot and appears to be the original 
model for the matrix of a seal for the Admiralty which was 
not adopted. 

An unpublished bronze medal of Admiral Vernon, struck 
in 1739 on his departure for Porto Bello. 

Presented hy Captain C. P. Wilson. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 93 

An unpublished bronze medal commemorating the defeat 
of the French fleet off Cape Finisterre in 1747. 

A specimen in bronze of the gold " Ramsay Medal " 
awarded to the most distinguished student in the " Honours 
Humanity Class " in the University of Glasgow. 

Presented hy H. A. Grueber, Esq. 

A bronze portrait medal of William Hughan as a founder 
of the Quatuor Coronati Lodge (No. 2076) of Freemasons. 
Presented by William Hughan, Esq. 
4 Mediaeval and Modern Series : — 
(a) Coins : — 
A very important series of 129 foreign sterlings of the 
fourteenth century, imitations of the English silver penny, 
representing the coinages of Flanders, Hainaut, Namur, 
Brabant, Liege, Herstal, Loos, Luxemburg, Bar, Toul, 
Cambrai, Ligny, Rethel, Porcien, the German Empire, Trier, 
Cologne, Lippe, Schoneck, Heinsberg, Jlilich, Gelderland, etc. 
These were collected by the late Mr. Samuel Smith, who 
made a special study of the subject. 

Bequeathed by the late Samuel Smith, Esq. 
(S8 modern silver coins of Saxony and Bavaria. 

Presented by J. R. McClean, Esq. 
(6) Medals:— 
A good specimen in lead of the medal by Pisanello of 
John VIII. Palseologus, Emperor of Constantinople : obv. 
Bust of the Emperor, Greek inscription ; rev. The 
Emperor on horseback before a wayside cross ; behind him, 
a mounted squire seen from behind. The artist's signature 
in Greek and Latin. This medal was made probably at 
Ferrara on the occasion of the Emperor's visit to Italy for 
the Councils of Ferrara and Florence (1488-9). 

• Presented by Alfred de Pass, Esq. 
A line silver-gilt medal by Antonio Abondio the Younger : 
obv. Bust of Christ, wearing crown of thorns ; signed 
AN.AB; rev. Christ standing with the instruments of the 
Passion, supported by two putti, one of whom holds the 
Cross. 

A bronze portrait-medal (not contemporary) of the painter 
Francesco Primaticcio. 

Presented by Max Rosenheim, Esq., F.s.A. 
A bronze medal of a Dutch Gild of Armourers : obv. St. 
Eligius : rev. Armourer at work. Dutch inscription 
signifying " He who receives this and does not return it 
forfeits one pound of wax." Signed STE. H. showing it to 
be by the medallist known as " Stephen of Holland, " who 
worked from 1558-1572. 

Presented by Max Rosenheim, Esq., f.s.a. 
Five silver badges of the Societe des Gueux : obv. EN 
TOVT FIDELES AV ROY Bust of Philip II. of Spain; 



94 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BKITISH MUSEUM. 

rev. JVSQVE A PORTER LA BESACE. Clasped hands 
and two wallets ; or. Two Gueux shaking hands. Two of the 
specimens are dated 1566. These badges were worn by 
members of the well-known Soci(^tt des Gueux formed in 1566 
to resist the Inquisition while maintaining loyalty to the 
King. Bequeathed by the late R. T. Pritchett, Esq. 

A modern striking in silver from the Paris Mint of a medal 
of Louis XV. relating to the foundation and fortification of 
Louisburg (1720). Presented by J. S. McLennan, Esq. 

A bronze medal by the artist Godefroid de Vresse in 
commemoration of the International Exhibition held at Liege 
in 1905. Presented by the Gomite Executif of the Liege 

Exhibition of 1905. 

5. Oriental Series: — 
(a) Coins. 

12 silver coins of the western Kshatrapa Nahapana, 6 of 
which have been countermarked by the Anclhra Gautamiputra. 
Presented by the Government of Bombay. 

2 gold Kushan coins of the third century A.D. 

Presented by the Government of the 
Central Provinces of India. 

2 bronze and a silver coin of the white Huns and an early 
Indian cast coin. Presented by E. G. Coutts, Esq. 

A copper coin of the Omayyad Khalif Abd-al-Malik, 
sti'uck at 'Amman c. 690 A.D,, imitated from the Byzantine. 

A dirhem of the Abbasid Khalif Al-Mansur struck at 
AEreekiyeh, a.h. 144. 

Presented by the British School of 
ArchcEology in Egyiot. 
28 silver and copper coins of the Ghaznawees and the 
Sultans of Delhi ; also 3 gold fanams of Vijayanagar. 

Presented by Evelyn Grant Duff, Esq. 
5 silver larins or fish-hook money of Western India found 
in the Rahiagiri district, Bombay. 

Presented by the Government of Boinhay. 
2 gold coins of the Malay State of Achee. 

Presented by H. W. Thomson, Esq. 
28 silver and copper coins of the Bahmams, the Arab 
Governors of Sindh, the Moghul Emperors, and the modern 
State of Kashmir. 

Presented by the Government of the 
Central Provinces of India. 

14 rupees of the Moghul Emperor Aurangzib from the 
rarer mints. 

4 rupees of the Moghul Emperors, Shahjahan and 
Aurangzib. Presented by S. Tulloch, Esq. 



DEPARTMENT OF COINS AND MEDALS. 95 

2 gold, 3 silver^ and a copper coin of Nasr-ad-din and 
Muzaffar-ad-din of Persia. 

A gold and a silver coin of Fetli-'Ali-Shah of Persia and 
a rare dirliem of the Buweyhid Khalif, Azad-ed-daulah, 
struck at Shiraz, 344 A.H. 

]0 forgeries of current Persian silver coins and a silver 
coin (altmishlik) of Seleem III. of Turkey struck at Islambol, 
A.H. 1204. Presented by H. L. Rahino, Esq. 

(h) Medals. 
A large silver medal struck in 189G to commemorate the 
.50th regnal year (Mohammadan reckoning) of Nasr-ad-din, 
Shah of Persia. Presented by Evelyn Grant Duff, Esq. 

17 silver medals of Nasr-ad-din and MuzafFar-ad-din of 
Persia and a large gold medal struck in 187G by Nasr-ad-din 
to commemorate the 100th year of the rule of the Kajar 
dynasty. 

A gold nisar distributed at the funeral in February 1898 
of Sultan Abdul Hawad of Selangor. 

Presented by G. W. Harrison, Esq. 

7 gold nisars of the Moghul Emperors 'Alamgir II., Ahmad 
Shah, Mohammad Shah, Shah 'Alam, and Bahadur Shah. 

Presented by Evelyn Grant Duff, Esq. 

V. — Students and Visitors. 
The number of visits made to the Department of Coins 
and Medals by students and others during the year 1907 
was 4,191. 

During part of the month of July and part of August, 
the department was necessarily closed to visitors and 
students during the cleaning and re-painting of the Medal 
Room, corridor, and adjoining studies. 

H. A. Grueber. 



96 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



X. — British Museum (Natural History). 



STATEMENT of Progress made in the Arrangement and 
Description of the Collections, and Account of 
Objects added to them, in the Year 1907. 

General Progress. 

Visitors. 

The total number of visits recorded as having been made 
by the public to the Museum during the year 1907 was 
497,437, as compared with 472,557 in 1906 — an increase of 
24,880. The number of visits on Sunday afternoons was 
66,367, as against 61,151 in the previous year. 

The average daily attendance for all open days was 
1,370 • 3 ; for week-days only, 1,386 ; and for Sunday after- 
noons, 1,276 • 3. 

The time of closing the Museum in the latter half of 
February has been extended from 4.30 to 5 o'clock. 



Siuiney Lectures. 

Dr. R. F. Scharff having postponed the delivery of his 
second course of lectures on the Swiney foundation until the 
autumn of 1908, the Trustees appointed Professor J. Cossar 
Ewart, M.D., Edin., to be Swiney Lecturer for 1907. He 
selected as the subject " Horses — Past and Present." The 
lectures, twelve in number, were given in the theatre at the 
Victoria and Albert Museum (by permission of the Board of 
Education), in December. 

The average attendance for the course was TOO persons 
per lecture, as compared with 160 for that of 1906. 

Electric Lighting. 

His Majesty's Office of Works has been requested to put 
in hand the lighting of the Bird Gallery, the Fish Gallery, 
the Central and North Halls, and the East and West Corridors 
on the first floor, with inverted arc lamps of an approved 
pattern. 

Heating and Ventilation. 

The scheme for heating and ventilating the Museum 
prepared by the Chief Engineer of His Majesty's Office of 
Works has been approved by the Trustees, and the Lords 
Commissioners of His Majesty's Treasury have agreed to 



BEITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 97 

provide in the Museum Estimate (Class IV. j, 1908-9, for the 
installation of the new apparatus in the west (Zoological) 
wing of the building. 

Works, etc. 

The ceiling, walls, and pillars of the Bird Gallery have 
been whitened, in order to improve the lighting. 

The construction of a room over the western corridor 
to contain the study collection of small mammals is being 
proceeded with. 

On the recommendation of the Chief Officer of the London 
Fire Brigade, automatic sprinklers for fire protection have 
been placed in the building containing the collections pre- 
served in spirit ; and, for the better security of the Museum, 
an auxiliary fire main has been provided. 

Expedition to Equatorial Africa, 

By the liberality of several friends of the Museum, who 
supplied the requisite funds, an exhibition was organized 
under the leadership of Mr. R. B. Woosnam for the zoological 
exploration of Mount Ruwenzori in Equatorial Africa. The 
expedition was successful in obtaining a very fine and 
valuable collection of specimens of the fauna of the mountain, 
including a number of new species. 

Gifts. 

The total number of gifts received during the year by 
the several Departments of the Museum was 2,105, as com- 
pared with 2,057 in 1906. Many of these comprised large 
numbers of individual specimens. The details of the more 
important of them will be found in the reports of the Keepers 
of the Departments, but the following may be mentioned as 
of special interest : — 

From the Egyptian Government. —An important series of 
fishes from the Nile, forming a portion of the collection made 
by Mr. Leonard Loat during the years 1899-1902, probably 
the largest collection of fishes from one river ever brought 
together. The Museum series includes the types of 30 new 
species. 

From His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. — The 
skeleton of an Indian elephant from Mysore. 

From the Hon. W. Rothschild. — A mounted specimen of a 
bull of the Alaskan Elk. 

From Mr. Boyd Alexander, in the name of the Alexander- 
Gosling Expedition. — The skin and skull of a male Okapi, 
and portions of the skin of two other individuals of the 
same species, obtained by him during his recent journey from 
Nigeria to the Nile, 

0.109. Q 



98 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

From Major Powell-Cotton.— The skins of an adult male 
Okapi and a young Okapi, both from the Upper Ituri district 
of Equatorial Africa. 

From Mr. A. 0. Walker. — A copy of Paulson's work on 
the Crustacea of the Ked Sea, published in 1875 — an exceed- 
ingly rare book, of which only 100 copies were printed, only 
one other copy being known to be in England. 

From the Duke of Bedford. — A further series of natural 
history specimens collected in the Far East by Mr. M. P. 
Anderson, comprising mammals from Hokkaido, Saghalien, 
and Mindanao, and birds from Saghalien, etc. 

From Professor W. A. Herdman. — A number of sponges, 
including several type-specimens, collected by him during 
his investigation upon the Pearl Oyster Fishery of Ceylon. 

From Mr. Henry Harvey. — A valuable series of types and 
figured specimens of shells, selected from the collection of 
the late Sylvanus Hanley, co-author in 1848-53 of the 
" History of British Mollusca." 

From Mr. F. W. Styan. — A valuable collection of about 
10,000 specimens of Chinese birds. 

From Miss Glazebrook Rylands. — The important collec- 
tion of diatoms made by her father, the late Thomas 
Glazebrook Bylands, consisting of about 6,000 microscope 
slides and 900 bottles of diatom material, besides a valuable 
correspondence. 

From Mr. R. E. Turner. — A series of 1,893 Australian 
hymenoptera (including many type-specimens), collected and 
mounted by himself. 

From Mr. Percy C. Tarbutt— A valuable series of minerals 
from the new mines at Broken Hill, N.W. Rhodesia. 

The late Miss Caroline Birley has bequeathed to the 
Museum her valuable geological and mineralogical collections. 

Purchases. 

Among the more important purchases made during the 
year, special mention may be made of the following : — 

The skeleton of an adult male Okapi, obtained by Major 
Powell-Cotton in the Ituri Forest ; the Goodfellow collection 
of birds from New Guinea and Formosa ; a collection made 
by Mr. G. S. Miller of 4,000 specimens of North American 
mammals, containing about 400 species, many new to the 
Museum ; models of giant squid and octopus, for exhibition ; 
part of the late Dr. F. Moore's collection of Indian and 
Malayan butterflies, including 119 type-specimens ; a selected 
series of 150 remains of large extinct lemurs from a swamp 
of pleistocene age in Madagascar, nearly all the species repre- 
sented being new to the Museum, and several new to science ; 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 99 

the collection made by the late Professor J. F. Blake of about 
7,000 invertebrate fossils from India, Russia, and Britain ; a 
collection of 14,000 brachiopoda and 950 mollusca from the 
trias of Bosnia ; and the first half of the important collection 
of British sea-weeds made by the late Mr. E. A. L. Batters. 



Exchanges and Gifts of Duplicates. 

Exchanges of duplicate specimens have been made with 
various institutions and individuals. 

The following have been added to the list of institu- 
tions to receive grants of duplicate specimens of natural 
history, viz. : — 

The London School of Tropical Medicine ; the Northern 
Polytechnic Institute, London, N. ; Croydon Borough Museum, 
South Norwood ; Mansfield Museum ; Inverness Museum ; 
and Dundonald Road School, Wimbledon. 

The duplicate specimens of mammals and birds in the 
collection obtained by the Discovery Antarctic Expedition 
have been distributed among the following institutions : — 

Royal Scottish Museum, Edinburgh ; National Museum, 
Dublin ; Cambridge University Museum ; National Museum, 
Melbourne ; South African Museum, Gape Town ; Liverpool 
Museums ; American Museum of Natural History, New York ; 
Thames Nautical Training College, H.M.S. "Worcester"; 
Oxford University Museum ; Christchurch Museum, New 
Zealand. 

From the other duplicate specimens in store selections 
have been presented as follows : — 

Of zoological specimens — to the Evening Education Com- 
mittee of the Garden City, Letchworth ; Bristol Museum ; 
Guy's Hospital Medical School ; the Royal Scottish Museum, 
Edinburgh : Oxford University ; St. Andrews University ; 
Plymouth Museum ; the Natal Government Museum, Pieter- 
maritzburg : the South Eastern Agricultural College, Wye ; 
the National Museum, Dublin ; the Hancock Museum, New 
castle-upon-Tyne ; Mr. C. J. W'ith; Professor G. Ulmer ; 
Major H. Mann, for a small local museum at Milton Damerel, 
N. Devon ; Dr. F. Spaeth ; Dr. W. van der Weele ; Professor 
J. B. Smith ; Mr. A. Grouvelle ; Mr. J. G. de Man ; Mr. Budde- 
Lund ; Mr. R. Shelf ord ; Mr. P. Lesne ; Mr. Martin Jacoby ; 
Mr. S. Schenkling ; and Mr. R. Gordon-Smith. 

Of fossils and casts of fossils— to University College, 
London; Professor C. Deperet ; Mr. J. A. Stigand ; Dr. Otto 
Reis : and Professor F. Beyschlag. 

Of minerals — to Professor J. Joly, of Dublin University; 
and Dr. F. Zambonini, of Naples University. 

Of plants — to the Surveyors' Institution, Westminster. 

g2 



100 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

Puhlications. 
The following works on Natural History have been 
published during the year : — 

National Antarctic (Discovery) Expedition, 1901-4. 
Natural History : — 

Vol. I. Geology (Field Geology, by H. T. Ferrar ; 
Petrography, by G. T. Prior. D.Sc.j. Pp. xii., 160, 
10 plates, 72 text-figures, and 2 maps. 4to. £1 10s. 

Vol. II. Zoology. 4 memoirs on Vertebrata, 1 on 
Pterobranchia, 5 on Mollusca, 1 on Brachiopoda, and 
2 on Crustacea. Pp. xiv., 357, 33 plates, 146 text- 
figures, and 1 map ; many of the plates are from original 
drawings made by Dr. E. A. Wilson in the Antarctic. 
4to. £3. 

Vol. III. Zoology and Botany. A memoir on Collect- 
ing in Antarctic Seas, by Mr. T. V. Hodgson, the naturalist 
on board the " Discovery,'' 1 on Pteropoda, 4 on Crus- 
tacea, 1 on Pycnogonida, 1 on Acari, 1 on Chsetognatha, 
1 on Nematoda, 1 on Cestoda, 3 on Coelentera, 1 on 
Sponges, 2 on Marine Algae, and 1 on Mosses. Pp. vi., 
273, 51 plates, 8 text-figures, and 1 chart. 4to. £2 lO.s. 
These reports are by various authors, English, French, 
German, and Belgian, and most have been generously con- 
tributed by naturalists not on the staff of the Museum. 

Monograph of the Culicidse, or Mosquitoes. Vol. IV. 
By Fred. V. Theobald, M.A. Pp. xix., 639, 16 plates, and 
297 text-figures. 8vo. £1 12s. 6d. 

Catalogue of the Works of Linnseus (and publications 
more immediately relating thereto) preserved in the Libraries 
of the British Museum (Bloomsbury) and the British Museum 
(Natural History). Pp. 27. 4to. 6d. 

List of British Seed-plants and Ferns exhibited in the 
Department of Botany. Pp. 44. Svo. 4}d. 

Guide to the Great Game Animals (Ungulata) in the 
Department of Zoology. Pp. 93, 53 text and other figures. 
Svo. Is. 

Guide to the Specimens of the Horse Family (Equidse) 
exhibited in the Department of Zoology. Pp. 42, 26 figures. 
Svo. Is. 

Guide to the Fossil Invertebrate Animals in the Depart 
ment of Geology and Palaeontology. Pp. ix., 182, 7 plates, 
and 96 text-figures. Svo. Is. 

Special Guide, No. 3. — Memorials of Linnseus : a collection 
of Portraits, Manuscripts, Specimens, and Books exhibited to 
commemorate the Bicentenary of his Birth. Pp. 16, 2 plates. 
Svo. Sd. 

New editions have been issued of the Guide to the Coral 
Gallery, price Is. ; and the pamphlet of Instructions for 
Collecting Insects, price Bd. 



BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY), lOl 

Selections of the natural history publications of the 
Museum have been sent to Free Libraries and other insti- 
tutions in Great Britain and Ireland, to Colonial, Indian, 
and foreign Museums, Libraries, and scientific societies, and to 
various individuals who have either assisted in the preparation 
of the volumes or otherwise benefited the Museum ; and 
additions have been made to the publications exchange-list. 

The under-mentioned works are in preparation : — 
Catalogue of the Library, Vol. III. 

National Antarctic Expedition, 1901-4. Natural History 
Vol. IV., V. 

Catalogue of Bats, by Dr. Knud Andersen. 

Monograph of the Okapi, by Sir E. Ray Lankester, 

K C B F R S 

Hand-list of Birds, Vol. V., by Dr. R. B. Sharpe. 

Catalogue of Birds' Eggs, Vol. V., by W. R. Ogilvie 
Grant. 

Catalogue of the Fresh-water Fishes of Africa, by G. A. 
Boulenger, F.R.s. 

Illustrations of African Blood-sucking Flies, with text by 
E. E. Austen. 

Catalogue of Moths, Vol. VIL, by Sir G. F. Hampson, Bart. 

Catalogue of Polychiete Worms, by Dr. J, H. Ashworth. 

Monograph of British Lichens, Vol. II., by Miss A. L. 
Smith. 

Monograph of the Mycetozoa, second edition, by A. Lister, 
F.R.s. 

Handbook of British Basidiomycetes, by W. G. Smith. 

Catalogue of Marine Reptiles of the Oxford Clay, by 
Dr. C. W. Andrews. 

Catalogue of Fossil Fishes, Vol. V., by Dr. A. Smith 
Woodward, f.r.s. 

Catalogue of Cretaceous Bryozoa, Vol. II., by Dr. J. W. 
Gregory, F.R.S. 

Guide to Elephants (Recent and Fossil). 

Guide to the Fish Gallery. 

Guide to the Exhibited Series of Insects. 



General Library. 
The additions to the General Library during the past year 
have been : — 

By purchase - - - 412 volumes, and 7 maps. 
By donation - - - 601 volumes, 21 maps, and 

49 photographs. 
By transfer from other 

Departments - - 46 volumes, and 23 maps. 

Total - - 1,059 volumes, 51 maps, and 
49 photographs. 



102 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

All the volumes and maps have been catalogued, press- 
marked, and put in their places, while 717 volumes have 
been bound in 269, 148 have been repaired, and 1 map has 
been mounted. 

The extent of the collection on the .31st of December was 
86,901 volumes, 5,666 maps, and 383 photographs (not includ- 
ing those in the Owen Collection of Drawings, &c.). 

The accessions to the Departmental Libraries have also 
been catalogued as they came in, and duplicate transcripts of 
the titles have been returned with the books. 

Altogether 2,372 title-slips have been written, 341 re- 
written, and 3,264 revised. 

There are now, on a rough estimate, 84,086 volumes 
(exclusive of continuations and minor separata) and 5,951 
maps in the whole building. 

The printing of the Catalogue was resumed, and the work 
at the end of the year stood as follows : — 

No. of sheets passed for press (A — Linnseus) - 144 
No. of title-slips set up in type (A — Loew) - 33,578 

A preprint of the titles of the works under the heading 
" Linnseus " was prepared and issued in time for the bicen- 
tennial celebrations of the birth of Linnseus. It includes 
the titles of such other of his works as are represented in the 
Department of Printed Books, but of which there are no 
copies in the Natural History Museum. 

The identification of the Drawings in the Owen Collection 
is in progress. 

The number of visits paid to the Library during the year 
by students and others (irrespective of the Stafi') was 1,816. 



Index Museum and Morphological Collections. 

In the Entrance Hall a coloured cast of the Tile-fish, a 
fish which for several years after the heavy gales of the early 
part of the year 1882 was supposed to be extinct, has been 
placed in one of the centre cases, with a map showing the 
very limited distribution of the fish. In the same case have 
been added series of animals preserved in formalin, illus- 
trating the nature of the food of the Plaice, Turbot, Sole, 
and Gurnard. 

The series of specimens illustrating the life history of the 
Eel has. been increased by an evenly graded series of Lepto- 
cephalus of the Freshwater Eel from the Mediterranean, and 
another of larvae of the Conger Eel from the same region, 
also by a mass of Elvers from the Severn and some young 
Eels from the Thames. 

The specimens of Cephalodiscus nigrescens and C. liodg- 
soni dredged in the Antarctic Ocean by the " Discovery," 



BRITISH MirSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY). 103 

and another new species, G. gilchristi, obtained in the Cape 
Seas, and the specimen of C. dodecalophus dredged by the 
" Challenger," have been mounted in special exhibition jars, 
and after being shown for a time in the Entrance Hall have 
been placed on exhibition in the Shell Gallery. 

The series of Crabs showing the extent to which the 
external appearance, particularly those characters known as 
secondary sexual characters, may become altered, in con- 
sequence of the animal being attacked by the parasite 
Sacculina, has been removed from the eastern side of the 
Entrance Hall to the Arthropod Gallery. 

Two new cases have been constructed for Bay 6 in the 
Hall, and these are set up obliquely so as to secure the best 
possible illumination. They are intended for the series of 
Peas and Maize illustrating the Mendelian hypothesis of 
inheritance, and for a similar series of cross-bred Mice which 
is in progress, but not yet complete. Advantage has been 
taken of the incompleteness of this last series to use one of 
the cases for the temporary display of a series of Eolithic 
flint implements presented by Dr. H. P. Blackmore, and, for 
comparison with these, a selection of Eolithic and Palseolithic 
implements from the Prestwich Collection. 

Much has been done in re-spiriting and remounting such 
of the anatomical preparations in the Entrance Hall as were 
in need of attention. 

A series of twenty-two wax models illustrating the early 
development of the mollusc Grepidula, presented by the 
American Museum of Natural History, has been placed 
on exhibition in a cabinet case in the North Hall. 

Experiments have been made to ascertain the best method 
of storing large skeletons, not required for exhibition, in such 
a manner that they may occupy the least possible space and 
yet be freely accessible for purposes of study, and a skeleton 
of Giraffe has been dismounted and stored in a specially con- 
structed cabinet, to serve as a pattern. 

E. Maunde Thompson, 
Director and Principal Librarian 
British Museum (Natural History), 
22 February 1908. 



104 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 



Department of Zoology". 
I. — ArfangeTYient and Conservation. 

Mammalia. — The repainting of the ceiling of the lower 
mammal gallery involved the removal from the walls and 
tops of the cases of all the specimens of skulls, horns, and 
antlers, as well as of the pictures and labels on the walls. 
Advantage of this was taken to effect some modifications in 
the arrangement of the specimens, with the view to their 
better display. 

To accommodate new specimens, and for other reasons, 
several cases in the lower mammal gallery have been opened 
up b)^ the removal of the partitions, and thus rendered more 
effective for the display of their contents ; these, as well as 
certain other cases in both upper and lower mammal galleries, 
have been painted green, instead of white, inside. 

The new elk-case has been installed in the lower mammal 
gallery, and fitted with artificial ground-work of an effective 
type. 

In the upper mammal gallery the chief work has been the 
transference of the specimens illustrating the Australian 
natives from a position among the Negro group to one in the 
Caucasian series, in accordance with modern anthropological 
views. This has involved certain changes in other groups ; 
and where such changes have been extensive the opportunity 
has been taken to repaint the interior of the cases, with the 
substitution of a green for a white background. 

Two new illustrated guide-books have been published, 
one dealing with Big Game Animals, and the other with the 
members of the Horse Group, both wild and domesticated. 

Many of the descriptive labels in the upper and lower 
mammal galleries, as well as one in the whale-room, have 
been revised and reprinted in order to bring them up to 
date, while several additional labels have been prepared and 
installed. 

Among the presentations added to the exhibition series, 
are : — Two Gobi Wild Horses, calf of Brindled Gnu, and a 
young American Tapir, presented by the Duke of Bedford, 
K.G. Albino Beaver skin, presented by E J. Halsey, Esq. 
Model of African Elephant, presented by the Zoological 
Society. A male and head of female Caucasian Tur, pre- 
sented by Prince Paul Demidoff. A Platypus, bequeathed by 
Mrs. Vernon Bell. Head of Hartebeest, presented by Walter 
Jones, Esq. Photograph of African Pigmies, presented by 
Sir Benjamin Stone, m.p. Female Forest-pig, presented by 
Cecil Whitaker, Esq. Young Gorilla, presented by Rowland 
Ward, Esq. Two Markhor skulls, presented by the Mehtan 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. l05 

of Chitral. Photographs of Sea-Elephants, presented by the 
Hon. Walter Rothschild, m.p. Skulls of African Antelopes, 
presented by F. Vaughan Kirby, Esq. An Arabian Oryx, 
presented by P. B. Vander Byl, Esq. and G. P. Denny, Esq. 
Two Sambar and one Buffalo skull, presented by Mrs. J. 
Anderson. Head of Kopet Dagh Urial, presented by Major 
Kennion. Model of Megacerops, presented by R. S. Lull, Esq. 
Head of a Seladang or Malay Gaur Bull, presented by T. R. 
Hubback, Esq. Head of Sclater's Muntjac, presented by J. H. 
Teesdale, Esq. 

In the Whale Room the model of the Beluga or White 
Whale has been repainted ; and arrangements are in progress 
for treating the casts of Dolphin-heads on the walls in a 
similar manner. 

For the British Saloon a case to exhibit the characters of 
the skulls and teeth, and the details of the colouring of the 
skins of a large number of the smaller mammals has been 
completed and installed during the year. This has rendered 
it possible for the student to see at a glance the characteristic 
features of each species. 

The most important presentations to this series are a 
Badger, from E. C. Hawes, Esq. ; photographs of Carnivora 
and Rodents, from Douglas English, Esq., and five Bats, from 
Heatley Noble, Esq. 

Domesticated Animals : — Several minor alterations have 
been made in the arrangement of the specimens, with a view, 
principally, of increasing the available accommodation ; and 
additional descriptive labels have been prepared and printed 
to illustrate species new to the series. 

The following are among the specimens presented to this 
series during the year : — 

A Pariah Dog from Constantinople, presented by Her 
Grace the Duchess of Bedford. Skeleton of Eskimo Dog, 
Arctic King, presented by A. P. King, Esq. Slughi Hound, 
presented by the Hon. Florence Amherst. Skull of Bull- 
dog, presented by H. S. Woi-msley, Esq. Skull of Great 
Dane, presented by the Hon. Walter B. Wrottesley. Skeleton 
of Bloodhound, presented by Edwin Brough, Esq. Chinchilla 
Pekin Spaniel, presented by Mrs. F. M. Weaver. A Skye 
Terrier, presented by C. L. Vanderhoff, Esq. Skull of 
Dartmoor Pony, presented by Capt. S. S. Flower. A Poodle, 
presented by Miss C. M. Faithfull. Old English Sheep-Dog, 
presented by Mrs. Fase Forse. Head of Long-horn Bull, 
presented by G. C. Bacon, Esq. Head of Skye-Goat, presented 
by Sir Donald Currie, G.C.M.G. Head of Egyptian Sheep, 
presented by Capt. H. D. W. Lloyd. Casts of Humped Ox- 
horns, presented by Senor Don Bolivar. A Hausa Sheep, 
presented by the Zoological Society. Silver Runt Pigeon, 
presented by W. A. Hasler, Esq. Pekin Spaniel, presented 
by Rowland Ward, Esq. 



106 ACCOUNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM. 

In the study series of mammals the work of labelling, 
registering, and incorporating the accessions has been pro- 
ceeded with. Three mahogany store-cabinets for the skins 
of small mammals, six deal store cabinets for larger mammals 
the size of a fox, and a block of deal cupboards for the skins 
of antelopes, &c., have been added. Acquisitions continue 
to come in to this section at a rate which makes it difficult 
to keep pace with the work entailed. The department is, 
however, indebted for much valuable assistance in this 
matter to volunteer helpers, among whom are Mr. R. C. 
Wroughton, Dr. Forsyth Major, f.r.s., and Mr. Gerrit S. Miller. 

With the assistance of a private donor, the services of 
Dr. Knud Andersen have been continued in working out and 
re-labelling the collection of Chiroptera in preparation for 
his forthcoming work on the new edition of the Catalogue. 

The work of building the new mammal store-room above 
the Western Corridor has been commenced. 

Aves. — Progress has been made with the work in the 
Gallery ; the British Birds in the Pavilion have now been 
mostly remounted or renewed, and will shortly be completely 
arranged. 

Cases containing the Bower of the Gardener- Bower-Bird 
(Amhlyornis subalaris), and a nesting group of BufFon's 
Skua {Stercorarius parasiticus) have been added. 

The Catalogue of the Eggs, Vol. V., has been continued to 
the end of the Fringillidce, and Vol. V. of the " Handlist of 
Birds " is approaching completion. 

A considerable number of skeletons has been added to 
the Avian Osteological series : partly by the incorporation of 
the Robert Collection, and partly by preparations made from 
specimens in the Spirit Collection, preserved for that purpose. 
In addition much curatorial work has been necessary to keep 
the collection in order. The arrangement of the Passerine 
skeletons is approaching completion. 

Reptilia. — In the Reptile Gallery general conservation 
and revision of descriptive labels have been carried on during 
the year. 

Among purchases, are a number of casts of reptiles and 
amphibians from Ward, of Rochester. A full-sized model of 
the skeleton of the Horned Dinosaur has also been installed 
during the year. 

Pisces. — In the Fish Gallery sloping backgrounds have 
been fitted into Wall-cases 8-13 similar to those in the rest 
of the Gallery, and the appropriate specimens have been 
arranged upon them. 

Forty-two specimens of fishes have been restored and 
coloured according to published coloured figures and descrip- 
tions, in continuation of the work begun in 1904, and seven 
new stuff'ed specimens and four coloured casts have been 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 107 

added ; also a number of morphological preparations to 
illustrate certain anatomical features that are utilised in the 
classification of Fishes. 

A new specimen of the Port Jackson Shark, specially- 
sent from Australia in ice, has been mounted in the centre 
line of the Gallery ; and a copy of the Prince of Monaco's 
oceanographic map of the world has been framed and 
attached to the table-case that contains the Sea-perch, 
Epinephelus lanceolatus. 

The Card-Catalogue of the specimens exhibited in the 
Fish Gallery, drawn up so as to give the British Museum 
register number of each specimen, the locality and history, 
and the references to the figures and descriptions from which 
it was coloured, has now been completed. A Hand-List of 
the 830 specimens has also been drawn up and indexed. 

The northern half of the Fish Gallery was re-opened to the 
public in November, and the various table-cases and cabinet- 
cases in that part of the Gallery were re-arranged. The 
arrangement of the specimens in Wall-cases C-15, however, 
is still incomplete. In order to avoid delay in throwing open 
the whole of the Gallery to the public, the names only of the 
fishes in these cases have been attached ; printed labels 
giving the special features of interest of each fish, similar to 
those in Wall-cases 1-5 and 16-20, will be proceeded with 
during the year 1908. 

A Guide-book to the Gallery of Fishes is in an advanced 
stage of preparation, and will probably be completed in 
March 1908. This Guide will contain photographic reproduc- 
tions of the restored models of extinct fishes and deep-sea 
fishes which have been specially prepared in the Museum 
during the past four years. The system of appending a 
numeral against each specimen exhibited, already followed 
in the Galleries of Birds and Reptiles, is being adopted in 
the Fish Gallery (although not yet fully carried out), and 
references to these numerals are being made in the Guide. 

The work of expanding the collection in the spirit 
building has proceeded, and is now practically finished. It 
has been found impossible to expand the Reptile collection, 
and nearly half of the Fish collection, which still remain in a 
state of great congestion. The new cases which were made 
a short time ago are occupied by the Batrachians and the 
fresh-water fishes of Africa ; the removal of these groups 
has permitted the temporary expansion of about half of the 
general collection of Fishes. A catalogue of the African 
fresh-water fishes being now in preparation, these have been 
placed together as a provisional step, it being impossible for 
want of room to expand or arrange them in their proper 
place in the main collection. 

Mollusca. — An exhibition case containing Cephalopoda 
has been partly arranged, the re-mounting and re-labelling of 



108 A.CCOCJNTS, ETC., OF THE BRITISH MUSEaM. 

the land shells have been continued, and the study collection 
of Stenogyrinse has been arranged geographically. The types 
from the Hanley and Da Costa collections have all been 
identified with the descriptions and figures, mounted and 
incorporated, and two collections from the Central African 
Lakes and Birket el Kurum have been worked out and 
reported on. All the numerous acquisitions have been 
registered, mounted, and placed in the general collection. 

Arachnida and Myriopoda. — The arrangement of the 
exhibited series of Arachnida and Myriopoda has been com- 
pleted, and the cases in which the specimens are contained 
have been cleaned. Progress has been made with the com- 
pilation of the manuscript catalogue of Scorpions and a 
card-catalogue index to the collections of Arachnida has been 
begun. The determination of the unnamed Arachnida in the 
co